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Full text of "Duquesne University Bulletin 1986-1987"

DUQUESNE 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 




Undergraduate Catalog 

1986-87 



Directory 



ADDRESS— University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15282 
Telephone: Call specific number (see following); 
for other offices, call 434-6000 

ADMISSION — Director of Admissions, Administration Building, First Floor 
Telephone: (412) 434-6220/6221/6222 

ADVISORS 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, College Hall, Room 215 

Telephone: (412) 434-6394/6395/6396 

School of Business and Administration, Rockwell Hall, Room 403 

Telephone: (412) 434-6277/6278 

School of Education, Canevin Hall, Room 214 

Telephone: (412) 434-6118/6119 

School of Music, Room 315 

Telephone: (412) 434-6083 

School of Nursing, College Hall Room 637D 

Telephone: (412) 434-6346/6347 

School of Pharmacy, Mellon Hall of Science, Room 421 

Telephone: (412) 434-6385/6365 

ROTC— College Hall, Fourth Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6614/6664/6665 
BOOKSTORE— Duquesne Union, Second Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6626 
CAMPUS MINISTRY— Administration Building, First Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6020 
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT— Administration, Third Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6644/6645/6646/6647 

CASHIER — Payment of Tuition and Fees, Administration Building, Ground Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6585/6586/6587/6588 
CHAPLAIN — Administration Building, First Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6020/6021 

DEAN OF STUDENTS— Duquesne Union, Third Floor 
Telephone: (412) 434-6657/6658/6659 

FINANCIAL AID — Loan, Scholarship, Student Employment, Applications 
Administration Building, Ground Floor 
Telephone: (412) 434-6607/6608/6609 

HEALTH SERVICE— Duquesne Towers, Second Floor 
Telephone: (412) 434-7822/7823 

IDENTIFICATION CARDS— Office Services, Rockwell Hall, Lower Level 

Telephone: (412)434-6191 
INFORMATION CENTER— For University Events, Duquesne Union, Third Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6632/6633 
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION ADVISOR— Administration Building, Fourth Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6113 
LEARNING SKILLS PROGRAM— Administration Building, Third Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6661/6662/6636 
PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELING— Center for Testing and Research 

Telephone: (412) 434-6561/6562/6563 

PUBLIC SAFETY— Public Safety Building 

Telephone: (412) 434-6001/6002/6003 
REGISTRAR — For Transcripts and Records, Rockwell Hall 

Telephone: (412) 434-6214 (Transcripts) 434-6215 (Records) 

RESIDENCE LIFE — For Housing, Duquesne Towers 

Telephone: (412) 434-6655/6656 (Second Floor: Billing Contract) 

434-7802/7803/7804 (First Floor: Room Assignments) 
STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE— G & G Building, Second Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6058/6059 
TESTING BUREAU— Administration Building, Third Floor 

Telephone: (412) 434-6204/6208 



Duquesne University 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



UNDERGRADUATE 
CATALOG 

1986-1987 



Published annually, in July, by Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15282. 

NOTICE OF RIGHT TO PRIVACY 

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, access to student records by non-University person- 
nel is restricted unless granted by the student, or dependency of the student is demonstrated by a parent or 
guardian. 

Duquesne University admits students of any sex, race, color, national and ethnic origin to all rights, 
privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does 
not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, national or ethnic origin, veteran's status or non-perfor- 
mance related handicap in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship 
and loan programs, and athletic and other University-administered programs. 

Contents 

Calendar 2 

I. General Information 9 

II. Programs and Courses 14 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 14 

Business and Administration 64 

Education 76 

Music 84 

Nursing 108 

Pharmacy 117 

R.O.T.C 132 

III. Student Life: Programs, Services and Organizations 135 

IV. Campus Ministry 139 

V. Admission, Financial Aid, Tuition and Fees 140 

VI. Registration, Scholastic Policies 153 

VII. Directories 159 

Index 183 

The provisions of this catalog are to be considered directive in character. The University reserves the right 
to make any changes that seem necessary or desirable, including fees, tuition and room and board. 
Faculty listings contained in this catalog are current as of Spring 1984. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1985-1986, 1986-1987 

1985-86 FALL SEMESTER— 1985 



July 19 



Friday 



August 15 
August 21 
August 22 
August 23 
August 24 
August 24 
August 24 
August 26 
September 2 
September 3 


Thursday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Saturday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Monday 

Tuesday 


September 7 


Saturday 


September 14 


Saturday 


September 20 


Friday 


September 21 


Saturday 


October 8 
October 1 1 


Tuesday 
Friday 


October 18 
October 18 


Friday 
Friday 


October 25 


Friday 


October 25 


Friday 


November 1 
November 14 


Friday 
Thursday 


November 22 


Friday 


November 23 
December 2 
December 8 

December 9 

-* 


Saturday 
Monday 
Sunday 
Monday 


December 1 1 
December 12 
December 13 


Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 


December 14 


Saturday 


December 20 


Friday 


December 20 


Friday 


December 21 


Saturday 



Latest Date for Fall Semester Pre-registration with Pay-By- 
Mail Option. 
Holiday: Assumption 
Final Registration.* 
Final Registration.* 
Final Registration.* 
Final Registration.* 

Latest Date to Cancel Registration without Penalty. 
Latest Date to Register without Late Fee. 
Semester Begins. 
Holiday: Labor Day. 
Latest Date to Register, 
Latest Date for Change of Class Schedule, 
Latest Date to Declare Pass/Fail, 
No Refund After this Date for Credits Dropped. 
Latest Date for 80% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date for 40% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date for December Prospective Graduates to Apply 
for Graduation. 

Latest Date for 20% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 
Reading Day. 

Latest Date for Undergraduates to Complete I Graded 
Courses of the 1985 Spring Semester and the 1985 Summer 
Session. I Graded Courses Not Complete by this date receive 
the Permanent Grade of F. 
Latest Date to Submit Mid-term Grades. 
Due Date for Instructors to Submit Undergraduate I Grade 
Removal Grades. 

Latest Date for December Prospective Graduates to Submit 
Thesis Outline and Schedule Comprehensives. 
Latest Date for Undergraduates Other than First Semester 
Freshmen to Withdraw with W Grade. 
Holiday: All Saints Day. 
Spring Semester Pre-registration Begins.* 
Other Dates: Nov. 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22. 
(F, S, M, T, W, H, F.) 

Latest Date for 1986 Spring Semester Pre-registration with 
Pay-By-Mail Option. 

Last Class Day Before Thanksgiving Holidays. 
First Class Day After Thanksgiving Holidays. 
Holiday: Immaculate Conception. 

Latest Date for December Prospective Graduates to Submit 
Approved Thesis to School and to take Comprehensives. 
Reading Day. 
Reading Day. 

Latest Date for First Semester Freshmen to Withdraw with 
W Grade. 

Final Examinations Begin. Other Dates: December 16, 17, 
18, 19, 20. (M, T, W, H, F.) 

Semester Ends. Latest Date for Graduating Students to 
Complete Degrees and Pay Accounts. 
Latest Date for Graduate Students to Complete I Graded 
Courses of the 1984 Fall Semester. 
Holiday: Christmas Recess Begins. 



*See Semester Class Directory for Time Schedule. 



SPRING SEMESTER— 1986 



November 22 


Friday 


January 9 


Thursday 


January 10 


Friday 


January 1 1 


Saturday 


January 1 1 


Saturday 


January 1 1 


Saturday 


January 13 


Monday 


January 18 


Saturday 


January 18 


Saturday 


January 18 


Saturday 


January 18 


Saturday 


January 24 


Friday 


January 25 


Saturday 


January 27 


Monday 


January 31 


Friday 


February 8 


Saturday 


February 28 


Saturday 


March 7 


Friday 


March 7 


Friday 


March 14 


Friday 


March 22 


Saturday 


March 31 


Monday 


April 3 


Thursday 



April 7 



Monday 



April 14 


Monday 


April 25 


Friday 


April 28 


Monday 


April 29 


Tuesday 


April 30 


Wednesday 


May 6 


Tuesday 


May 6 


Tuesday 


May 8 


Thursday 


May 9 


Friday 


May 9 


Friday 


May 10 


Saturday 


May 26 


Monday 


July 4 


Friday 


July 14 


Wednesday 



August 15 



Friday 



Latest Date for 1986 Spring Semester Pre-registration with 
Pay-By-Mail Option. 
Final Registration.* 
Final Registration.* 
Final Registration.* 

Latest Date to Cancel Registration without Penalty. 
Latest Date to Register without Late Fee. 
Semester Begins. 
Latest Date to Register. 
Latest Date for Change of Class Schedule. 
Latest Date to Declare Pass/Fail. 
No Refund After this Date for Credits Dropped. 
Latest Date for May Prospective Graduates to Apply for 
Graduation. 

Latest Date for 80% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date for May Prospective Graduates to Submit Thesis 
Outline and Schedule Comprehensives. 
Latest Date for 40% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date for 20% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date for Undergraduates to Complete I Graded 
Courses of the 1985 Fall Semester. I Graded Courses Not 
Completed by this date receive the Permanent Grade of F. 
Latest Date to Submit Mid-term Grades. 
Due Date for Instructors to Submit Undergraduate I Grade 
Removal Grades. 

Latest Date for Undergraduates Other than First Semester 
Freshmen to Withdraw with W Grade. 
Last Class Day Before Easter Holidays. 
Frist Class Day After Easter Holidays. 
Fall Semester Pre-registration Begins.* Other Dates: April 4, 
5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. (F, S, M, T, W, H, F.) 
Latest Date for May Prospective Graduates to Submit Ap- 
proved Thesis to School Office and to Take Comprehen- 
sives. 

Latest Date for May Graduates to Pay Accounts. 
Latest Date for First Semester Freshmen to withdraw with 
W Grades. 
Reading Day. 
Reading Day. 

Final Examinations Begin. Other Dates: May 1, 2, 3, 5, 6. (H, 
F, S, M, T.) 

Semester Ends. Latest Date for Graduating Students to 
Complete Degrees. 

Latest Date for Graduate Students to Complete I Graded 
Courses of the 1985 Spring Semester. 
Holiday: Ascension Day. 
University Convocation and Honors Day. 
Graduation Mass. 
Commencement. 
Holiday: Memorial Day. 
Holiday: Independence Day. 

Latest Date for 1986 Fall Semester Pre-Registration with 
Pay-By-Mail Option. 
Holiday: Assumption. 



*See Semester Registration Schedule for Other Dates and Times. 



FALL SEMESTER— 1986 



July 16 

August 20 
August 21 
August 22 
August 23 
August 23 
August 23 
August 25 
September 1 
September 2 
September 2 
September 2 
September 2 
September 6 

September 13 

September 19 

September 20 

October 4 
October 8 
October 10 



October 13 
October 17 
October 17 

October 18 
October 24 

October 24 

October 25 

October 26 

November 1 
November 6 
November 21 
November 21 

November 22 
December 1 
December 8 
December 9 
December 1 1 
December 12 
December 12 

December 12 

December 15 
December 20 
December 20 
December 20 

December 20 

December 22 



Wednesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Saturday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Saturday 

Saturday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Saturday 

Wednesday 

Friday 



Monday 

Friday 

Friday 

Saturday 
Friday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Saturday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Friday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Friday 

Friday 

Monday 
Saturday 
Saturday 
Saturday 

Saturday 

Monday 



Latest Date for Fall Semester Pre-Registration with Pay-By- 
Mail Option. 
Final Registration. 
Final Registration. 
Final Registration. 
Final Registration. 

Latest Date to Register Without Late Fee. 
Latest Date to Cancel Registration Without Penalty. 
Fall Semester Begins. 
Holiday: Labor Day. 
Latest Date to Register. 
Latest Date for Change of Class Schedule. 
Latest Date to Declare Pass/Fail. 
No Refund After this Date for Credits Dropped. 
Latest Date for 80% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date for 40% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date for December Graduates to Apply for Gradua- 
tion. 

Latest Date for 20% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 
Religious New Year: Rosh Hashanah* 
Reading Day. 

Latest Date for Undergraduates to Complete "I" Graded 
courses of the 1986 Spring Semester and 1986 Summer Ses- 
sion. "I" Graded courses not completed by this Date Re- 
ceive the Permanent Grade of "F". 
Day of Atonement: Yom Kippur* 
Latest Date for Reporting Mid-term Grades. 
Due Date for Instructors to Submit Undergraduates "I" 
Grade Removal Grades. 
Tabernacles: SUCCOT* 

Latest Date for December Graduates to Submit Thesis Out- 
lines and Schedule Comprehensives. 

Latest Date for Undergraduates other than First Semester 
Freshmen to Withdraw with "W" Grade. 
Concluding Day of Tabernacles: 

SH'MINI ATZERT* 
Festival of Rejoicing in the Torah: 

SIMCHAT TORAH 
Holiday: All Saints Day 
Spring 1987 Pre-Registration Begins. 
Spring 1987 Pre-Registration Ends. 

Latest Date for 1987 Spring Semester Pre-Registration with 
Pay-By-Mail Option. 

Last Class Day Before Thanksgiving Holiday. 
First Class Day After Thanksgiving Holiday. 
Holiday: Immaculate Conception. 
Follows the Monday Class Schedule. 
Reading Day. 
Reading Day. 

Latest Date for December Graduates to Submit Approved 
Thesis to School Office and to take Comprehensives. 
Latest Date for First Semester Freshmen to withdraw with 
"W" Grade. 

Final Examinations Begin. 
Final Examinations End. 
Semester Ends. 

Latest Day for Graduating Students to Complete Degrees 
and Pay Account. 

Latest Date for Graduate Students to Complete "I" Graded 
Courses from the Spring 1986 Semester. 
Holiday: Christmas Recess Begins. 



*Some Jewish students may be absent; holiday begins at sunset of preceding evening. 



SPRING SEMESTER— 1987 



November 21 


Friday 


January 8 


Thursday 


January 9 


Friday 


January 10 


Saturday 


January 10 


Saturday 


January 10 


Saturday 


January 12 


Monday 


January 16 


Friday 


January 16 


Friday 


January 16 


Friday 


January 16 


Friday 


January 23 


Friday 


January 24 


Saturday 


January 30 


Friday 


January 31 


Saturday 


February 7 


Saturday 


February 27 


Friday 


March 6 


Friday 


March 6 


Friday 


March 7 


Saturday 


March 14 


Saturday 


March 16 


Monday 


April 3 


Friday 


April 10 


Friday 


April 14, 15 


Tues., Wed. 


April 15 


Wednesday 


April 16 


Thursday 


April 17 


Friday 


April 20, 21 


Mon., Tues. 


April 21 


Tuesday 


April 28 


Tuesday 


April 28 


Friday 


April 29 


Wednesday 


April 30 


Thursday 


May 6 


Wednesday 


May 6 


Wednesday 


May 6 


Wednesday 


May 6 


Wednesday 


May 8 


Friday 


May 8 


Friday 


May 9 


Saturday 


May 25 


Monday 


May 28 


Thursday 


June 3, 4 


Wed., Thurs 


July 4 


Saturday 


July 15 


Wednesday 



August 15 



Saturday 



Latest Date for 1987 Spring Semester Pre-registration with 
Pay-By-Mail Option. 
Final Registration 
Final Registration 
Final Registration 

Latest Date to Cancel Registration without Penalty. 
Latest Date to Register without Late Fee. 
Semester Begins. 
Latest Date to Register. 
Latest Date for Change of Class Schedule. 
Latest Date to Declare Pass/Fail and Auditor. 
No Refund After this Date for Credits Dropped. 
Latest Date for May Graduates to Apply for Graduation. 
Latest Date for 80% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date May Graduates to Submit Thesis Outline and 
Schedule Comprehensives. 

Latest Date for 40% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date for 20% Tuition Remission for TOTAL WITH- 
DRAWAL from the University. 

Latest Date for Undergraduates to Complete I Graded 
Courses of the 1986 Fall Semester. I Graded Courses not 
completed by this date receive the permanent Grade of F. 
Latest Date to Submit Mid-term Grades. 
Due Date for Instructors to Submit Undergraduates I Grade 
Removal Grades. 

Last Class Day Before Spring Break. 
First Class Day After Spring Break. 

Latest Date for Undergraduates Other than First Semester 
Freshman to Withdraw with W Grade. 
1987 Fall Semester Pre-registration Begins. 
Latest Date for Graduating Students to Pay Accounts. 
Passover; PESACH* 
Last Class Day Before Easter Holidays. 
Holiday: Holy Thursday. 
Holiday: Good Friday. 
Concluding Days: PESACH* 
First Class Day After Easter Holidays. 
Will Follow the Thursday Class Day Schedule. 
Latest Date for First Semester Freshmen to Withdraw with 
W Grades. 

Will Follow the Friday Class Day Schedule. 
Final Examinations Begin. 
Final Examinations End. 

Semester Ends. Latest Date for Graduating Students to 
Complete Degrees. 

Semester Ends. Latest Date for Graduating Students to 
Complete Degrees. 

Latest Date for Graduate Students to Complete I Graded 
Courses of the 1986 Spring Semester. 
University Convocation and Honors Day. 
Baccalaureate Liturgy. 
Commencement. 
Holiday: Memorial Day. 
Holiday: Ascension Day. 
Shavuot: Pentecost* 
Holiday: Independence Day. 

Latest Date for Fall 1987 Preregistration with Pay-By-Mail 
Option. 
Holiday: Assumption. 



*Some Jewish students may be absent; holiday begins at sunset of preceding evening. 



All Degrees and Programs Offered in the University 

SCHOOL BACHELOR'S DEGREE MASTER'S DEGREE DOCTORATE 



College of 
Liberal Arts 
and Sciences 



Graduate 
School of 
Liberal 
Arts and 
Sciences 



School of 
Business and 
Administration 



School of 
Education 



School of 
Music 



School of Law 



Art History 

Biochemistry 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Classics 

Classical 

Civilization 
Computer 

Science 
Criminal Justice 
Economics 
English 
French 
German 
Gerontology 
History 
International 

Relations 
Journalism 
Liberal Arts/ 

Engineering 
Mathematics 



Media Arts 
Philosophy 
Physics 
Political 

Science 
Psychology 
Social 

Communication 
Social Services/ 

Human 

Services 
Sociology 
Spanish 
Speech 
Speech 

Pathology/ 

Audiology 
Theatre/Media 
Theology 
World 

Literature 



Accounting 



Economic 

Science 
Finance 
International 

Business 
Law Administration 



Management 

Management 

Information 

Systems 

Marketing 

Pre-Legal Studies 

Quantitative and 

Information 

Systems 



Early Childhood Education 
Elementary Education 
Secondary Education 
Special Education 

(Mentally and/or 

Physically 

Handicapped) 



Bachelor of 

Music in 
Piano Orchestral 

Instruments 
Organ Sacred 

Music-Organ 
Voice Sacred 

Music-Voice 
Guitar jazz 



Bachelor of 

Science in Music 

Education 
Bachelor of 

Science in Music 

Education with 

a concentration 

in Music 

Therapy 



School of 
Nursing 




Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing 





Biochemistry 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Communications 

English 

Formative 

Spirituality 
German 
History 

Archival. 

Museum and 

Editing Studies 
Liberal Studies 
Mathematics 
Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry 



Pharmaceutics 

Pharmacognosy 

Pharmacology 

Toxicology 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Theology 

Pastoral 

Ministry 



Chemistry 

Engish 

Formative 

Spirituality 
Philosophy 
Psychology 
Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry 
Theology 



Masters in 
Business 
Administration 
(M.B.A.) 



Counselor Ed. 

(Community. 

Elementary 

and Secondary) 
Elementary Ed. 
School Admin. 

(Elem. and 

Secondary) 



School Psychology 
School Supervision 
Secondary 

Education 
Special Education 
Post-Master's for 

Certification 



Music Education 
Theory 
Composition 
Applied Music 
Sacred Music 
Piano Pedagogy 
Music Therapy 



Folk Art 
Jazz 



School of 
Pharmacy 




Medical Technology 
Pharmacy 
Radiological Health 








Hospital 
Pharmacy 

















Juris Doctor 






Part I: General Information 



HISTORY 

Duquesne University first opened its doors as the 
Pittsburgh Catholic College of the Holy Ghost in 
October, 1878 with an enrollment of 40 students 
and a faculty of seven. The school grew rapidly in 
its first years until it moved from its original loca- 
tion on Wylie Avenue in the city's Uptown section 
to its present site, a scenic 39-acre hilltop called 
"The Bluff,'' which overlooks downtown 
Pittsburgh. 

By 1911, the school had achieved university sta- 
tus, at which time the name Duquesne University 
of the Holy Ghost was adopted in honor of the 
18th century governor general of French Canada, 
the Marquis de Duquesne, who first brought Cath- 
olic services to Pittsburgh while it was under 
French dominion. 

Duquesne's great period of student growth after 
World War II, along with the necessity of refur- 
bishing a make-shift physical plant, led the Uni- 
versity to begin an ambitious program of planned 
physical expansion and modernization in 1950. 

Now in the enviable position of having com- 
pleted most of its physical development needs for 
the foreseeable future, the University is a modern, 
attractive, highly functional educational facility 
which has more than tripled from its early 12.5 
acres to its present, self-enclosed 39-acre campus 
site. 

Today, Duquesne University is not only one of 
the leading private institutions in Pennsylvania, 
but also is one of several major private, Catholic, 
urban universities in the United States. 

The University has over 6,000 students enrolled 
in its eight schools: College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences (1878), Graduate School of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences (1911), and the Schools of Law 
(1911). Business and Administration (1913), 
Pharmacy ( 1 925), Music ( 1 926), Education ( 1 929), 
and Nursing (1937). Duquesne's eight schools 
offer degree programs on the baccalaureate, profes- 
sional, master's, and doctoral levels. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

While Duquesne University can look with pride at 
the remarkable transformation of the campus 
effected by its physical development and expan- 
sion prrogram, it has never lost sight of its primary 
role as an educational institution and its responsi- 
bilities to the students who form the Duquesne 
family. 

A Catholic institution operated by the Congre- 
gation of the Holy Ghost, Duquesne is open to 
students of all religions and creeds. A community 
committed to the ideal of producing young men 
and women whose minds seek intellectual free- 
dom and truth, the University seeks to impart to 
its students the ability to judge and make decisions 



independently, to interrelate disciplines and expe- 
rience, and to balance memory, reason and 
imagination. 

In essence, the Duquesne student is ideally an 
individual with a fully integrated personality and a 
sensitivity and responsiveness to his humanity 
and that of his fellow man. 

The educational objectives of the University 
include the development of a sound philosophy of 
life through an integration of spiritual, physical, 
intellectual, moral, social and aesthetic goals and 
values; the fostering of a spirit of inquiry and 
scholarship necessary for continuing intellectual 
and professional growth; the formation of a well- 
balanced, self-assured personality; and the 
imparting of an attitude of continuing self-evalua- 
tion and self-improvement both as an individual 
and a contributing member of the community of 
man. 

Duquesne offers a wide variety of programs and 
curricula from which students may select freely in 
accordance with their interests, capabilities and 
goals in life. 

Complemented by a broad spectrum of nonaca- 
demic activities and programs, the curriculum at 
Duquesne University is designed to prepare young 
men and women who, upon entering their chosen 
careers, will possess a broad, well-balanced and 
fully integrated education and perspective of 
themselves and the world. 

POLICY STATEMENTS ON 
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

The mission of Duquesne University's founders, 
the Holy Ghost Congregation, has always included 
service to peoples outside of the United States. 
Duquesne University also is committed to provid- 
ing an educational environment which recognizes 
cultural and national pluralism. 

Duquesne welcomes qualified students from 
throughout the world and encourages its students 
and faculty to take advantage of opportunities to 
study and teach abroad. 

The University believes that the sharing of the 
multiple traditions and mores of societies is an 
invaluable element in the educational process. 

In a world that is growing ever smaller, it is 
imperative that Duquesne reach out to peoples of 
different cultures to afford them the opportunity to 
acquire educational experiences not otherwise 
available to them. Interaction among international 
and American faculty and students will enrich all 
and enhance their ability to be better citizens of 
our shared world. 

Duquesne University asserts its commitment to 
develop and to maintain programs, services and 
practices which promote and express respect for 
persons of diverse cultures and backgrounds and 



10 



which provide educational bridges linking the peo- 
ples of the world. 

THE UNIVERSITY SETTING 

Located adjacent to downtown Pittsburgh, 
Duquesne University's modern hilltop campus is 
readily accessible to the business, entertainment 
and shopping centers of the city, while still offering 
students the privacy and peace of its own self- 
enclosed 39-acre site. 

Long noted as one of the world's greatest steel- 
producing centers, Pittsburgh combines the fea- 
tures of urban living with many of the charms and 
personal characteristics of a much smaller town. 
The third largest corporate headquarters center in 
the U.S. behind New York and Chicago, Pitts- 
burgh was also shown, in a recent survey of urban 
life, to be the fourth most desirable metropolitan 
area for overall quality of life in the U.S. 

Although most visitors and new residents who 
come to the city are conditioned by the old 
"Smokey City" image, they soon learn that the 
Pittsburgh which emerged from its nationally 
acclaimed "Renaissance" redevelopment program 
is not only a city of clean air and streets, safe 
neighborhoods, and a bustling economy, but that 
Pittsburgh, more than any other American city, 
has developed a strong civic identity and sense of 
pride in its rebirth as a modern urban community. 

Students from Duquesne and the other colleges 
and universities in the city can choose from a wide 
range of cultural events and institutions. 

The world-renowned Pittsburgh Symphony 
Orchestra, Pittsburgh Opera, and Pittsburgh Ballet 
Theatre all perform regularly in the elegant Heinz 
Hall for the Performing Arts. The theatregoer can 
choose from productions of the Pittsburgh Public 
Theatre, local college drama departments and pro- 
grams, and a wide variety of summer and after- 
dinner club theatres. 

In the summer, the American Wind Symphony 
offers open-air concerts on Pittsburgh's riversides. 
Other seasonal events include the Three Rivers 
and Shadyside arts festivals, and the International 
Folk Festival, three prestigious events which draw 
national attention. 

Duquesne students can visit such points of 
interest as Highland Park Zoo, Carnegie Museum 
.of Art and History, Scaife Gallery, the Conserva- 
tory-Aviary, Buhl Planetarium, Pittsburgh History 
and Landmarks Museum, Duquesne Incline and 
Phipps Conservatory. 

Directly across the river from campus is Mount 
Washington, Pittsburgh's highest point, which 
offers a spectacular view of the city and its sur- 
roundings, particularly at night. 

Market Square, a redeveloped area in the heart 
of downtown Pittsburgh, and the Oakland-Shady- 
side area in the eastern end of the city are two of 
the major entertainment and nightlife centers. 

The success of the various professional and 
major college sports teams has won for Pittsburgh 
the title of "City of Champions." The 1971 and 
1979 World Champion Pirates, four-time Super 



Bowl Champion Steelers and the USFL Maulers 
play at Three Rivers Stadium. The Penguins 
(National Hockey League), Spirit (Major Indoor 
Soccer League), and Duquesne Dukes nationally 
known basketball team, all perform in the nearby 
Civic Arena, one of the largest indoor sports are- 
nas in the United States and the only one in the 
world with a retractable dome. Facilities for such 
participatory sports as tennis, golf, running, hik- 
ing, skiing, skating, and many others are available 
throughout the Pittsburgh area. 

PHYSICAL FACILITIES 

The Administration Building, "Old Main," was 
the first building constructed on the Duquesne 
campus, dedicated in 1884. Recently renovated, it 
houses the Executive Offices of the University, 
Office of Admissions, Campus Ministry, Business 
Offices, Testing Bureau, Career Planning and 
Placement Office, Learning and Counseling 
Center, Financial Aid Office, and the Division of 
University Relations. Adjoin the building is the 
University Chapel, which offers daily Mass, and 
the Campus Theatre. 

Assumption Hall, the oldest residence hall on 
campus, was dedicated in 1956. A four-story struc- 
ture with a 280-student capacity, the facility has its 
own recreation area, and offers both single and 
double occupancy rooms. 

Canevin Hall, the oldest classroom building on 
campus, was built in 1922 and completely reno- 
vated in 1968. A four-story building, it houses the 
School of Education, Curriculum Library, Reading 
Clinic and Guidance and Counseling Clinic. 

College Hall, a six-story classroom and office 
building dedicated in 1970, is the seat of the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Graduate 
School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, housing 10 of 
their individual departments and faculties. The 
School of Nursing is located on the sixth floor. 
Special instructional facilities include psychology, 
numerical analysis, nursing, and practice skills 
laboratories, along with two lecture halls. 

The Counseling Center houses the University's 
Center for Training and Research in Phenomeno- 
logical Psychology, a facility operated by 
Duquesne's renowned Department of Psychology. 

The Des Places Communications Center, dedi- 
cated in 1982, houses the department of speech 
communications and theatre; department of jour- 
nalism; the new medical media communications 
program cosponsored by the University and 
Mercy Hospital; and the production and broad- 
casting studios of WDUQ television and radio, an 
affiliate of the national Public Broadcasting Sys- 
tem (PBS). Named in honor of the founder of the 
Holy Ghost Congregation, the center also features 
a journalism laboratory, simulation laboratory, 
instructional photo laboratory, seminar rooms, 
graphic arts classroom, and a little theatre per- 
formance room. The women's recreation center, 



1 1 



including a gym and slimnastics area, is located on 
the ground floor. 

The Duquesne Towers, a 17-story, air-conditioned 
double-tower residence for 1.200 men and women 
featuring separate housing wings, was dedicated in 
1970. The facility features a full-size indoor swim- 
ming pool with a sundeck, offices of the Residence 
Life Division, the Campus Health Services area, a 
main student lounge and smaller lounges on each 
floor, telephones in each room, and a resident din- 
ing hall with a 2.500 student capacity. 

The Duquesne Union, a modern architectural 
facility with an innovative concrete and glass 
design, is the center of campus activities and stu- 
dent life. Dedicated in 1967. it houses the offices of 
the Student Life, the Athletic Department, and 
various student organizations and interest groups. 
Facilities include three separate dining areas, a 
ballroom and student lounge, the campus book- 
store, the campus information center, and a recre- 
ation center which features eight bowling lanes, 
pocket billiards, table tennis, table soccer, a music 
listening room, pinball, electronic games, a rath- 
skellar. an art gallery, and an emporium. 

The G & G Building, in addition to housing vari- 
ous administrative offices of the University, also 
houses the University's Vocations Office. 

The Gymnasium is used as a practice facility by 
various intercollegiate athletic teams of the Uni- 
versity and as the center for indoor sports of the 
University's intramural sports program. The gym 
features a modern, fully equipped weight training 
facility, the Dukes Court Weight Room, which is 
open to the student body as well as the Univer- 
sity's varsity teams. 

McCloskey Field, dedicated in the mid-1970's, is 
the center for outdoor intramural activity. Other 
athletic facilities include three self-enclosed tennis 
courts and two outdoor basketball courts, one of 
which is converted for street hockey in the winter 
months. 

The Edward J. Hanley Hall of Law, dedicated in 
1982. resulted from the renovation and expansion 
of the old University Library building. The new 
facility houses faculty and administrative offices, 
research and study rooms, two large amphitheatre 
lecture halls, interview rooms, seminar and class- 
room areas, and a moot courtroom. The greatly 
expanded law library is the most accessible one of 
its kind in the city, with its central location and 
convenient hours (7 a.m. to midnight, Monday 
through Thursday: 10 a.m. to midnight, Sunday). 
The law library is open to members of the local 
bench and bar, as well as law students. 

The Library Resource Center, dedicated in 1978, 
is a modern, attractive five-story structure that sig- 
naled the crowning achievement of the Univer- 
sity's expansion and redevelopment program. 
Housed in over 100,000 square feet of space is a 
collection of over 455.000 volumes, more than 



3,900 periodicals, and an extensive microprint and 
audiovisual collection. 

The facility also contains a number of special 
collections, including the African Collection on 
African culture, society and politics; the Rabbi 
Herman Hailperin Collection on Medieval Chris- 
tian and Jewish intellectual and religious thought; 
the Silverman Center collection of world literature 
in phenomenology; and the University Archives. 

With seating capacity for approximately 1,000 
patrons, including graduate study carrels and con- 
ference facilities, the new Library constitutes a 
highly functional facility that should remain 
responsive to the needs of the Duquesne commu- 
nity for many years to come. Architects for the 
Library Resource Center, Gerard Associates, were 
cited by the Pittsburgh Chapter of the American 
Institute of Architects for creative design in their 
renovation and expansion of the original struc- 
ture, an old garage and warehouse constructed in 
the 1920's, into the present facility. The Music 
School, The Edward Hanley Hall of Law and Col- 
lege Hall also resulted from conversions of older 
structures. 

The Public Safety Building is the headquarters for 
the University's Public Safety Office. 

Richard King Mellon Hall of Science, an attrac- 
tive, four-story structure dedicated in 1968, houses 
the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemis- 
try, Physics, and the School of Pharmacy. 
Designed by one of the world's most renowned 
architects, Mies van der Rohe, the building won 
the "Laboratory of the Year" award in 1969. 
Instructional facilities include two large 
amphitheatre-style lecture halls with seating 
capacities of 248 each. 

The Music School, dedicated in 1967, has 73 
pianos, including 56 Steinways, five organs, and 
over 300 orchestral and band instruments avail- 
able for student use. The school offers training and 
degrees in conservatory and music education, jazz 
and sacred music, as well as an innovative pro- 
gram in music therapy. Individual and group prac- 
tice areas are available in the building, along with 
acoustically equipped classrooms. Performances 
are given throughout the school year in the recital 
hall, and the school hosts the annual Mid-East 
Instrumental Music Conference. 

Rockwell Hall, dedicated in 1958, is a 10-story 
structure which houses the School of Business and 
Administration. Its Business Simulation Labora- 
tory contains 12 conference rooms equipped with 
television cameras and microphones for observa- 
tion and recording of activity in the individual 
rooms. Rockwell Hall also houses a snackbar, the 
Business School's student lounge, the University's 
Systems Center, the Institute for World Concerns, 
the Division of Continuing Education, Registrar's 
Office, Student I.D. Center, Office Services 
Department, Peter Mills Auditorium and the 
Institute of Formative Spirituality. 



12 



St. Ann's Hall, dedicated in 1964, is a two-wing, 
three-story women's dormitory with its own laun- 
dry area, several lounges and television rooms, a 
recreation area, snack area, and attractive grounds. 
Double and single rooms are available. 

St. Martin's Hall. A 14-story residence, provides 
housing for graduate and law students, as well as 
non-Duquesne students from other Pittsburgh aca- 
demic and vocational institutions. 

Trinity Hall, dedicated in 1952, serves as the resi- 
dence of the Holy Ghost Fathers who serve the 
University as administrators and teachers. The 
grounds of the hall include an attractive mall and 
grotto. 

ACCREDITATION AND AFFILIATION 

University 

Accreditation 

Commission on Higher Education 

Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Schools 

State Board of Education of the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education 

Membership 

American Association of Collegiate Registrars 
and Admissions Officers 

American Council on Education 

Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities 

Association of College Admissions Counselors 

Catholic Educational Association of Pennsylvania 

College Entrance Examination Board 

Council for Advancement and Support 
of Education 

National Association for Independent Colleges 
and Universities 

National Association of College and University 
Business Officers 

, National Association of Foreign Student 
Administrators 

National Association of Student Personnel 
Administrators 

National Association of Student Financial Aid 
Administrators 

National Catholic Educational Association 

National Commission on Accrediting 

Pennsylvania Association of Colleges 
and Universities 

Pittsburgh Council of Higher Education 

Southwestern Pennsylvania Council on 
Higher Education 



College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Accreditation 

American Chemical Society 

Membership 

American Conference of Academic Deans 

American Society of Journalism School 

Administrators 
Association of American Colleges 
Eastern Association of College Deans and 

Advisors 

School of Business and Administration 

Accreditation 

American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of 

Business 
Accreditation Council 

Membership 

Association for University Business and 

Economic Research 
Middle Atlantic Association of Colleges of 

Business Administration 

School of Education 

Accreditation 

Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools 

Pennsylvania Department of Education 

Membership 

American Association of Colleges for Teacher 

Education 
Association of Independent Liberal Arts Colleges 

for Teacher Educators 
The Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and 

Teacher Educators 

School of Music 

Accreditation 

National Association of Schools of Music 

National Association for Music Therapy 

Membership 

American Symphony Orchestra League 

National Catholic Music Educators Association 

School of Nursing 

Accreditation 

National League for Nursing 

Approval 

Pennsylvania State Board of Nurse Examiners 

Membership 

American Association of Colleges of Nursing 
National League for Nursing (Council of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs) 

School of Pharmacy 

Accreditation 

American Council on Pharmaceutical Education 

Pennsylvania State Board of Pharmacy 

Membership 

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 

EVENING STUDY 

The School of Business and Administration and 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offer 
evening classes for full-time and part-time 
students each semester and during the Summer 



13 



Session. These are for persons whose employment 
does not permit them to attend as regular day 
students. 

Through careful planning and consultation with 
academic advisors, the bachelor's degree program 
may be completed by evening study in some 
major areas offered by these two schools. Other 
undergraduate schools also schedule occasional 
evening courses but it is not possible to complete 
their degree requirements through evening 
attendance alone. 

Prospective evening undergraduate students 
should consult with the office of the Dean of the 
school in which they are interested for information 
about the opportunity for evening study on a 
continuing basis. 

SUMMER SESSIONS 

Many undergraduate and graduate courses are 
offered each summer in most areas. They are open 
to qualified Duquesne students and to those from 
other colleges and universities. 

The sessions, of varying length, begin in May 
and run through mid-August. Short term offerings 
on one and two week duration, usually at the 
graduate level, are scheduled before and after the 
regular session. 



SYSTEMS CENTER/COMPUTER 
RESOURCES 

The Systems Center is a service department of 
the University which reports to the Vice President 
for Business and Management. The Systems 
Center has a UNI VAC 1100/62 computer with 8 
megabytes of main memory and 1.8 billion bytes 
of disk storage. In addition, the University 
recently invested over $1.7 million in new 
computer equipment, featuring 62 Sperrylink 
office system units and 36 UTS 400 terminals. 
Each Sperrylink consists of a terminal with a 
screen and keyboard and a diskette for storing 
information on magnetic disks. All the Sperrylink 
units and the UTS terminals will be linked in a 
computer-communications network to the Sperry 
1100/62 main frame. Students in every field of 
study will integrate their study programs, using the 
Sperrylinks and UTS 400 terminals. 

The Systems Center also provides all the data 
processing services for the administrative offices of 
the University. Some of these services are 
registration, grade reporting, admissions and the 
financial record-keeping requirements for the 
University. 




14 



Part II: 

Programs and Courses 



College of 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



HISTORY 

In 1878 the Fathers of the Congregation of the 
Holy Ghost and the Immaculate Heart of Mary 
established a College of Arts and Letters which 
was incorporated in 1882 as Pittsburgh Catholic 
College of the Holy Ghost with authority to grant 
degrees in the arts and sciences. In 1911 the Col- 
lege and University Council of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania extended the charter to 
university status and approved the amendment in 
favor of the corporate title, Duquesne University 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

Duquesne University believes that education is 
concerned with the human person as a whole — 
mind, body and soul. It believes that each individ- 
ual has the obligation to self, society, and God to 
develop potential to the fullest. In this commit- 
ment, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences sets 
its objectives and forms its curricula. 
The objectives of the College are: 

1. To provide a solid foundation for lifelong 
learning. 

2. To develop an awareness of the methodolo- 
gies and epistemologies of the major areas of 
knowledge so that evaluations and judgments may 
be valid. 

3. To assist in both the growth of self-knowledge 
and the development of a philosophy of life. 

4. To assist the individual to understand his 
relation to God, to society, and to nature. 

5. To perfect that skill in the use of standard 
English necessary to clear, coherent expression of 
one's thoughts, hopes, and ideals. 

6. To cultivate a background for the learned 
professions and for scholarly pursuits. 

CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS 

English Composition Proficiency at the 

102 level 
Modern or Classical Language . . . Proficiency at 

the 202 or 212 level 
Natural Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, 
Earth Sciences, Computer Science, 

Physics, Mathematics) Nine Credits. 

One two-semester sequential 
course must be completed 



Social Sciences (Political Science, 

Psychology, Sociology) Nine credits. 

At least two disciplines 
must be represented 

History, Literature Nine credits. Both 

disciplines must be represented. 

Philosophy, Theology Nine credits. Both 

disciplines must be represented. 
Communications 
(Journalism, Linguistics, Speech, 

Media Arts) Three credits 

Completion of Major Program . . As determined 
by department (Minimum of 24 credits) 
Completion of Minor Program . . As determined 
by department offering the minor 
(Minimum of 12 credits above the 
introductory courses) 
Students who major or minor in a basic area auto- 
matically satisfy the area requirements for that 
discipline. Courses taken in an interdisciplinary 
minor do not satisfy area requirements 

A maximum of 12 credits in the non-arts-and- 
sciences courses may be applied to the B.A. or B.S. 
degree. However, if the student chooses an inter- 
school minor, the maximum for the minor (Busi- 
ness, 15; Education, 15; Music, 15) will be applied 
to the degree, but all other courses must be 
selected from the arts and sciences offerings. 

A student's major and minor programs may not 
be chosen from the same department. (Modern 
Language majors may minor in another language.) 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

Completion of 120 credits 

A minimum cumulative quality point average of 
2.0 

Removal of I and F grades in major and required 
courses 

Completion of sequential courses in proper 
sequence 

Completion of the residence requirement. The last 
30 credits must be taken at the University. 
Submission of application for the degree. No stu- 
dent is considered a degree candidate until he files 
an application for the degree on a form provided 
by the Registrar. 

Any course taken as a Temporary Transfer at 
another institution must be approved before the 
classes are taken. 



15 



DEGREES 

The College confers two undergraduate degrees: 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts, Students 
who complete the major in biology, chemistry, 
computer science and physics receive the B.S. 
degree. Students who complete the major in art 
history, classics, economics, English, history, jour- 
nalism, media arts, modern languages, philosophy, 
political science, psychology, sociology, speech, 
and theology receive the B.A. degree. Students 
majoring in mathematics can follow a curriculum 
leading to either a B.A. or B.S. degree. 

The Associate of Arts Degree is awarded in 
International Communications for Industry, Com- 
munications for Industry, Criminal Justice and 
Applied Technology. 



Special Programs 



CONCENTRATED STUDIES 
PROGRAM 

Concentrated studies is a special developmental 
education program designed to help students 
improve their basic skills and realize their full 
potential for college work. Students in the program 
take a prescribed block of college level courses 
during their freshman year and thereafter com- 
plete their education at Duquesne in the tradi- 
tional manner. 

Courses offered in the program: 

001.002. BASIC LANGUAGE SKILLS 

4 cr. each semester 
003. BASIC CONCEPTS OF PSYCHOLOGY 

3 cr. 

005,006. FOUNDATIONS OF LANGUAGE, 
LATIN 

4 cr. each semester 

008. STUDY SKILLS 

1 cr. 

009. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS 
3cr. 

010. ETHICS 
3cr. 

012. GREAT BOOKS SEMINAR 

2 cr. 

121. GENERAL ETYMOLOGY 

cr. 
THE INTEGRATED HONORS PROGRAM 
Constance Ramirez, Ph.D, Director 

For the highly-qualified, motivated and commit- 
ted student who is searching for challenge, enrich- 
ment and enlightenment in a college education, 
Duquesne University offers a new Integrated Hon- 
ors Program (I HP). 

The IHP provides a unique opportunity, 
through great books from both Western and East- 
ern civilizations, to examine our essential human 
heritage and investigate and debate the major 
ideas and issues forming the background, direction 
and focus of modern life. Student participation 



and individual initiative in the Duquesne commu- 
nity of scholars are encouraged through daily con- 
tact with talented and committed fellow students 
and faculty from diverse fields, interests, and 
backgrounds. 

The IHP, supported in part by a grant from the 
National Endowment for the Humanities, consists 
of 12 accelerated freshman and sophomore 
courses and 4 upper level seminars. Students 
enrolled in the IHP may matriculate in the College 
of Arts and Sciences or one of the professional 
schools. Students will select majors and minors 
according to the policies of the College or of the 
School in which they are registered. The IHP cred- 
its, however, replace many of the required general 
education credits (for example, English, History, 
Sociology). 

The Integrated Honors Program curriculum is 
concentrated in the freshman and sophomore 
years. Studies are continued in the junior and 
senior years through Capstone Seminars. (Some 
rearrangement of the following schedule may be 
necessary for students in certain professional 
schools and science programs) 

FRESHMAN I (First Semester) 

101. Logic and Rhetoric. 3 cr. 

Clear and disciplined thinking, reading, speak- 
ing and writing. 

105. Approaches to Culture: The West. 4cr. 

An intensive analysis of the key ideas and the 
significant people, events and civilizations of the 
Western world — ancient, medieval, and contem- 
porary. 

113. Mathematics. 3cr. 

Quantitative literacy as a major mode of infor- 
mation gathering and thinking in the modern 
world. (Required of non-math, non-science 
majors) 

FRESHMAN II (Second Semester) 

104. Information Resources. 3cr. 

The rapidly-changing revolution in information 
and data-gathering, including traditional library 
resources and electronic media. 

106. Approaches to Culture: The East. 3cr. 

The great, historic and often unknown civiliza- 
tions of India, China, and Japan. 

115. The Rational Self. 3cr. 

Human nature, human intelligence and the ethi- 
cal sense. 

SOPHOMORE I (First Semester) 

203. Societal Structures I. 3 cr. 

The economic and social framework within 
which the individual functions. 

207. Science I: Chemistry and Physics. 4 cr. 

Contemporary developments and issues in the 
physical sciences. Laboratory included. (Required 
of non-science majors) 



16 



205. Approaches to Culture: The American 
Experience. 3 cr. 

The rise and significance of the U.S. as a demo- 
cratic, industrial, affluent, and open society. 

SOPHOMORE II (Second Semester) 

204. Societal Structures II. 3 cr. 

The development of political and legal systems. 

208. Science II: Biology and Biochemistry. 4 cr. 

Traditional and new directions in the life sci- 
ences. Laboratory included. (Required of non-sci- 
ence majors) 

210. The Aesthetic Experience. 3 cr. 

The visual arts and music as universal and dis- 
tinctive human experiences and cultural expres- 
sions. 

CAPSTONE SEMINARS 

Capstone seminars during the junior and senior 
years provide an in-depth study of some of the 
significant issues and themes which have emerged 
from the student's earlier IHP experience. These 
will be addressed within the context of the stu- 
dent's vocational and career interests. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 
PROGRAM 

The Cooperative Education Program is a service 
to students seeking expanded education through 
work experience and to employers seeking tempo- 
rary pre-professional staff with the ultimate objec- 
tive of early identification of the best available 
college-educated talent for permanent assignment. 

Under this plan, students may be employed in 
business, government and other institutional set- 
tings. The program design provides for short-term 
work assignments, and it requires the regular rota- 
tion of students in each job and competitive refer- 
rals for each work period. Employment may be 
either full- or part-time for one academic term or 
its equivalent. 

It is expected that the cooperative student will 
be paid a salary commensurate with the work 
assigned. The actual job must be pre-professional, 
well-defined and fully supervised. 

Sixty (60) or more earned credits and a cumula- 
tive quality point average of 2.5 or better are basic 
requirements for student qualification for the Pro- 
gram. Clearance from academic advisors is 
required of those studying in departments with 
other internship options. 

When employed, and before starting work, a 
cooperative student must enroll in the pass/fail 
course, "Cooperative Education, " which carries a 
minimum-maximum of three to nine credits for 
full-time and one to three credits for part-time 
work. 

For further information about the Cooperative 
Education Program, interested parties should con- 
tact: Director, Career Planning and Placement. 



PROGRAM IN WORLD LITERATURE 

The Departments of Classics, English, and Mod- 
ern Languages jointly offer a World Literature pro- 
gram — with both major and minor sequence. The 
program is designed to give the student an aware- 
ness of the historical and cultural framework in 
which Classical, British, American, Continental, 
Asian and African Literatures have evolved, their 
influence upon each other, and an in-depth study 
of selected major literary works in these areas. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Major: 24 credits (6 in the core and the remaining 
18 credits distributed equally among Classics, 
English, and Modern Languages) 

Minor: 15 credits (6 in the core and the remaining 
9 credits distributed equally among Classics, 
English, and Modern Languages) 

Core Course: Readings in World Literature I and 
II (English) 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Classics: Any of the current offerings in Classical 
Literature, either in translation or in the original 
language, at the 200 level or above. 

English: Any of the current course offerings in 
Literature at the 333-400 level, as approved by the 
department chairman. 

Modern Languages: Any of the current offerings in 
Modern Languages, either in translation or in the 
original language, above the 302 level. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS— LIBERAL 
ARTS AND GENERAL SCIENCES 

This program is designed for those students who 
prefer not to choose a formal major or minor 
offered in a traditional discipline. All requirements 
other than the major and minor must be com- 
pleted. Students must select one area of concentra- 
tion: Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sci- 
ences. A concentration requires a minimum of 30 
credit hours and a maximum of 39 hours. Courses 
must be chosen from courses 200 and above. 

PRELAW 

Students who intend to prepare for a career in law 
may select any subject area for the undergraduate 
major. They will be expected to meet degree 
requirements in the major department, as well as 
admission requirements of the law school of their 
choice. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH 
EDUCATION 

Students who intend to prepare for a career in 
medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, or 
related fields may major in the subject area of their 
choice and should select a major as soon as possi- 
ble. They must meet degree requirements of the 
major department, as well as admission require- 
ments of the professional school of their choice. A 
faculty committee on Pre-Medical Education 
assists the medically-oriented student 



17 



INTER-SCHOOL MINORS 

Intcr-school minors arc available in Business and 
Administration. Education and Music. For com- 
plete details students should consult the Director 
of Academic Advisement. 



BACHELOR-MASTERS 

A student who has completed all requirements and 
a total of 90 credits with a 3.5 average may apply 
for the bachelor/master's program. After success- 
ful completion of the master's program, the stu- 
dent will receive the bachelor's degree. 

BACHELORS/PROFESSIONAL 
SCHOOL 

A student who has completed 90 credits with a 
3.50 overall average and satisfied all undergradu- 
ate curricular requirements may apply for the 
bachelor's degree after the successful completion 
of the first year of professional work in an accred- 
ited medical or law school. 



LIBERAL ARTS ENGINEERING 

Students who intend to prepare for a career in 
engineering may enter a 3-2 binary program that 
Duquesne University maintains with Case West- 
ern Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Stu- 
dents are expected to meet the curricular require- 
ments of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
except for the completion of a major program. 
Under the guidance of a liaison officer, they will 
normally complete the program at Duquesne Uni- 
versity in three years then enter an engineering 
program at Case. 

Upon completion of the program at CWRU stu- 
dents will be awarded the B.A. Degree from 
Duquesne and B.S. Degree from the School of 
Engineering at Case. 

For complete details consult with the Liaison 
Officer for the Binary Program in Engineering in 
the Physics Department. 

SECOND BACHELORS DEGREE 

A student who has received a bachelor's degree 
from another school may become eligible for a 
second bachelor's degree by earning an additional 
30 semester hours in residence in the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences and by meeting all 
departmental and College requirements if not 
already satisfied. The additional 30 credits must be 
completed at the University and may not be taken 
through cross-registration. 

THREE-YEAR BACHELORS 

For information contact the Office of Admissions 
or the Dean of the College. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers the follow- 
ing Associate Degree Programs: 

• International Communications for Industry 

• Communications for Industry 

• Criminal Justice 

• Applied Technology 

A minimum of 60 credits is required. For 
details, consult the College Advisement Office at 
434-6394 or the Assistant Dean at 434-6393. 

CLEP AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

See page 142. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Electives 

A maximum of 12 non A & S credits may be 
applied to the BA/BS degree with the exception of 
certain approved inter-school minors which may 
extend this number to 15 credits. 

ACADEMIC LOAD 

Students may normally carry five courses in one 
semester. A schedule of more than five courses or 
17 credits must be approved by the Dean. In the 
summer sessions, students normally carry one 
credit a week; i.e., six credits in the six-week ses- 
sion. A 12-credit schedule in a regular semester is 
considered full-time study. Students on academic 
probation may not take more than 15 credits. 

EFFECTIVE CATALOG 

Degree requirements are those stipulated in the 
catalog of the year in which a student matriculates. 
The student is responsible for knowing the 
requirements for the degree. Requirements may be 
changed without notice or obligation. This catalog 
has been prepared on the best information avail- 
able as of Spring 1984. 

Major requirements are those stipulated in the 
catalog of the year in which a student declares the 
major. 

UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES 
TAKEN WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL 

University-level courses taken by entering fresh- 
men students while in their senior year of high 
school will be evaluated for credit if the following 
criteria have been met. 

• the courses are recorded on an official tran- 
script from an accredited institution of higher 
learning. The grades must be C or better. 

•the student has completed one semester at 
Duquesne with a C+ average, or better. 



MAJORS 

The College of Arts and 

Art History 

Biochemistry 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Classics 

Classical 

Civilization 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 
Economics 
English 

MINORS 

American 

Government 
American Literature 
Art History 
Biochemistry 
Biology 
Business and 

Administration 
Chemistry 
Classical 

Civilization 
Comparative 

Government 
Computer Science 



Sciences offers the followi 

French 

German 

Gerontology 

History 

International 

Relations 
Journalism 
Liberal Arts/ 

Engineering 
Mathematics 



Criminal Justice 

Earth Science 

Economics 

Education 

English Literature 

French 

General Speech 
Communication 
and Theatre 

German 

Gerontology 

Greek 



ng majors: 

Media Arts 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Social 

Communication 
Social Services/ 

Human Services 
Sociology 



History 
International 

Relations 
Italian 
Journalism 
Latin 

Mathematics 
Media Production 
Music 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Priestly Formation 
Psychology 



Spanish 

Speech 

Speech Pathology/ 

Audiology 
Theatre/Media 
Theology 
World Literature 



Russian 
Social 

Communication 
Social Services/ 

Human Services 
Sociology 
Spanish 
Speech Pathology/ 

Audiology 
Theatre/Media 
Theology 
World Literature 
Writing 



Course Descriptions 



ART DIVISION 

Director. Mrs. Patricia S. Ingram 

Survey and period courses in the history of western art are offered by the Art Division of the Classics 
Department to introduce the concepts of art history to those who wish to extend their visual perimeter and 
to understand the role of the visual arts in Western culture. Qualified students are advised to take collateral 
courses in classics, history, philosophy, and psychology, and additional upper division art history courses 
offered at member colleges of the Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education. In addition to personal enrich- 
ment and heightened awareness of man's will to create visual forms, the study of art history can lead to 
careers in teaching, publishing, museology, historic preservation, and urban redevelopment. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

The major consists of 1 1 1, 112 History of Art plus 18 credits in upper division art courses and two upper 
division collateral courses selected from 250 Classical Tradition in America (Classics), 419 Renaissance 
Literature and the Arts (English), 406 Aesthetics (Philosophy) and 313 Archaeology and the Bible (Theol- 
ogy). Recommended electives: 123 Classical Mythology, 219 Computer Use in the Humanities. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

The minor consists of 12 credits of upper division courses. The prerequisites are six credits of introductory 
and survey courses at the 100 level or their adjudged equivalent. 



101. Understanding Art. 3 cr. 

A study of the techniques and styles of architec- 
ture, sculpture, painting, and the graphic arts in 
Western society, with an emphasis upon increas- 
ing the student's comprehension of our visually 
oriented culture. Suggested preliminary for all 
upper division art history courses. 

102. Introduction to Modern Art. 3 cr. 

An attempt to render accessible to the spectator 
the realities formulated by the artists of the last 



two decades. Formal analysis of the art object and 
examination of the motivational forces which 
shaped its creation lead to an overall view of the 
structural framework of twentieth century painting 
and sculpture. 

111. History of Art: Ancient to 

Medieval World. 3 cr. 

A chronologically oriented, detailed presentation 
of the history of Western art. This survey deals 
with Near Eastern, Greek, Roman, Early Christian 



19 



and Medieval art. Can be elected to fulfill the his- 
tory/literature requirement. 

112. History of Art: Renaissance to 

Modern World. 3 cr. 

A continuation of 111. Surveys Renaissance, 
Baroque and Modern art in Western Europe. Can 
be elected to fulfill the history/literature require- 
ment. 

123. Classical Mythology. 3 cr. 

A presentation of the major myths of Greece and 
Rome with special attention to contemporary 
interpretations of myth and the influence of myth 
on art and literature. (Offered by the Classics 
Department) 

206. Greek Art. 3 cr. 

A study of the architecture, sculpture, vase paint- 
ing, and minor arts of the Greek world from 
Minoan to Hellenistic times. The student is intro- 
duced to the extensive vocabulary of Greek art 
which has been a continuing formative force in 
Western art. (Offered in alternate years) 

207. Roman Art. 3 cr. 

An introduction to Roman innovations in archi- 
tecture, sculpture, and painting. The background 
of Roman art in Etruscan, Greek, and Egyptian 
civilizations is investigated, and the impact of 
Roman art in formulating Christian Art, Renais- 
sance Art and Nco-Classicism is analyzed. 
(Offered in alternate years) 

208. French Art. 3 cr. 

A survey which discusses ideas, schools, and styles 
in the history of French art from the Roman occu- 
pation to the present. Highlights are Medieval, 
Renaissance, Rococo, and Modern art. (Offered in 
alternate years) 

210. American Art. 3 cr. 

An overview of American architecture, painting, 
sculpture and decorative arts intended to acquaint 
the student with the major trends and contribu- 
tions of American art from colonial to modern 
times. 

220. History of Photography. 3 cr. 

A survey of photographic developments from the 
early 19th C. to the present. Emphasis is upon the 
United States and upon the interaction of and con- 
frontation between painters and photographers. 

260. The Classical Tradition in 

America. 3 cr. 

A study of the influences of Graeco-Roman civili- 
zation on American cultural life. (Offered by the 
Classics Department) 

312. Late Medieval Art. 3 cr. 

Western European Art from the 1 1th to the 14th 
century. Focus is upon the development of stone 
vaulting systems, monumental architectural sculp- 
ture, stained glass, fresco and panel painting, and 
illuminated manuscripts in England, France, Italy, 
and Germany. (Offered in alternate years) 



321. 15th Century Renaissance Art. 3 cr. 

An investigation of the Renaissance spirit of the 
15th century. Concentration is upon comparisons 
of Northern and Southern attitudes of man, 
nature, and social structure, and to materials, tech- 
niques, pictorial representation, and iconography. 
(Offered in alternate years) 

331. Art of the 19th Century. 3 cr. 

A survey of the visual arts in the 19th century. The 
visual arts not only reflect the dramatic changes in 
the artists use of form, color, line, texture and 
light, but also emphasize the changing political, 
religious, and social values in society. (Offered in 
alternate years) 

332. Art of the 20th Century. 3 cr. 

A chronological study of 20th century painting 
and sculpture which "looks beyond visual percep- 
tion" and tries to find the essence and meaning of 
reality. From cubism to conceptual art, from 
Picasso to Pollock and Pop, this course offers a 
thorough exploration of the visual arts of the 20th 
Century. (Offered in alternate years) 

370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376. 

Special Studies in Art History. 3 cr. 

An occasional course in this series is offered when 
special interests of students and faculty can be 
served. Courses offered include The Image of 
Women in Art, Picasso, Impressionism, Egyptian 
Art. 

431. Selected Readings: 

Variable Topics. 1-3 cr. 

In-depth research, using the resources of Pitts- 
burgh area libraries and of source material rele- 
vant to the history of Western art. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

441. American Painting and Sculpture. 3 cr. 

An examination of the forms created by American 
painters and sculptors from the early 17th through 
the late 20th century. A special class intent 
involves arriving at a clear understanding of 
America's concept of reality during these years, 
particularly in the 20th century. (Offered in alter- 
nate years) 

442. American Architecture. 3 cr. 

Construction, style, building types, and concepts 
of city planning in American architecture from the 
17th century to the present. Field trips to impor- 
tant monuments in the Pittsburgh area are sched- 
uled. (Offered in alternate years) 

443. American Decorative Arts. 3 cr. 

Decorative arts from the Pilgrims to the Bauhaus 
are examined in context: historical, formal, tech- 
nological, and cultural. Field trips to Carnegie 
Institute and other area locations can be sched- 
uled. (Offered in alternate years) 

477. Introduction to Museum Studies. 3 cr. 

An overview of the various functions of art and 
associated museums in American society. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Department. (Offered in 
alternate years) 



20 



478. Internship. 3 cr. 

Practical experience in art related areas introduces 
the student to the many opportunities in the art 
field. Prerequisite: Permission of Department. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Chairman: Howard G. Ehrlich, Ph.D 

Biology is the scientific exploration of life in its many forms and details. It is a fundamental element in a 

balanced liberal education and offers both intellectual insight and knowledge vital to societies facing serious 

problems having biological implications. The biology program is a part of that search by mankind to 

understand its world in an effort to more effectively deal with the realities of that world and pursue its great 

promises. 

The undergraduate program is basic and flexible, providing a core of experience around which continuous 
future personal development may be centered. The program offers opportunity to develop professional 
attitudes and technical competence which aid in opening avenues for advanced study and career fulfillment 
as well as personal enrichment. The course of study pursued can aid in preparation for professional careers 
in teaching, research, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and allied health fields as well as for 
advanced study in various graduate school specialties. While many students choose to pursue the benefits of 
advanced study in graduate and professional schools, others prefer to pursue opportunities in biological 
technologies in pure and applied research and service in hospitals, universities, private industry, and 
governmental service. Diverse opportunities are available in specialty sales; pharmaceutical laboratories, 
medical laboratories, atomic energy research laboratories and chemical laboratories; food technology and 
processing; fisheries; oceanography; conservation; health services; space biology; agricultural technology; 
food and drug administration; environmental services; as well as in other industries and agencies. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

A minimum of 31 semester hours is needed. Majors are required to take General Biology 111, 112 and to 
select other courses so that a balance is achieved with experience in biology of inheritance, structure, and 
function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Within that context, students may follow their 
preferred interest in subject matter selection and concentration. The specific program selected is individu- 
ally formulated with the student through consultation with an advisor. Courses 107, 108, 201, 202, 206, 207, 
208, 220 and 230 will not be counted toward a major in biology. Qualified majors may take two 500 
introductory level graduate courses during their senior year and apply them toward their undergraduate 
degrees. 

Extradepart mental requirements: Calculus 1 15; General Chemistry 121, 122; Organic Chemistry 205, 206 
or 221, 222; General (or Analytical) Physics 201, 202, or 211, 212. Students also should consider 
extradepartmental electives in chemistry, mathematics, and computer science. A minimum of 15 credits in 
Biology must be taken at Duquesne University for the major. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

The department offers two minor programs: 

1. Professional Minor which consists of 1 1 1, 112 and a minimum of 12 credits selected from the depart- 
ment's major courses number 200 or above. Individual course prerequisites must be met. 

2. Adademic Minor which consists of 107, 108 or 111, 112 and a minimum of 12 credits selected from the 
department's courses numbered 200-395. Courses which are open to either non-majors may be selected. 
Individual course prerequisites must be met. 

If a student takes 107, 108 — Principles of Biology and 111,1 12 — General Biology, the credits for the 107, 
108 will not apply to the total number required for the degree. These courses are not interchangeable. 



NON-MAJOR COURSES 

107, 108. Principles of Biology. 3 cr. each 

Study of the living world of which man is an inte- 
gral part. It includes considerations of organiza- 
tion, activity, growth, reproduction, inheritance, 
environmental influences and other interrelation- 
ships. This course is designed to provide the non- 
scientist with the biological information and prin- 
ciples necessary to assume an enlightened role in 
our increasingly complex society. Not for Biology 
Major credit; 107 is prerequisite to 108. Lecture. 

109. Principles of Biology Laboratory. 1 cr. 

Laboratory work illustrating selected biological 
principles and factual details. Not for Biology 



Major credit. Prerequisite: Biology 107 (or concur- 
rent registration). Laboratory. 

201. Biology of Microbes. 3 cr. 

Examination of microbes as to what they are, how 
they grow, how they may be controlled, what their 
relationships to other living things are, why and 
how some of them cause disease. Not for Biology 
Major credit. Lecture. 

202. Biology of Microbes Laboratory. 1 cr. 

Illustrates methods of observation, growth, and 
identification of microbes as well as methods of 
controlling these organisms using sterilization 
techniques, disinfectants and antibiotics. Not for 



21 



Biology Major credit. Prerequisites: Biology 201 
(or concurrent registration). Laboratory. 

206. Environmental Biology. 3 cr. 

This course deals with the biological background 
for understanding environmental problems and 
considers population, energy, land use and pollu- 
tion, as well as legal aspects of the amelioration of 
environmental abuses. Not for Biology Major 
credit. Lecture. 

207. Anatomy and Physiology. 3 cr. 

Studies designed to provide students with a back- 
ground in the areas of human body structure and 
the mechanisms underlying normal body func- 
tions. Prerequisites: some previous exposure to 
introductory biology and chemistry is desirable. 
Not for Biology Major credit. Lecture. 

208. Anatomy and Physiology 

Laboratory. 1 cr. 

Laboratory includes examination of the micro and 
gross anatomy of the body, physiological experi- 
ments, and exposure to certain basic clinically 
important measurements and techniques. Prereq- 
uisites: 207 Anatomy and Physiology (or concur- 
rent registration). Not for Biology Major credit. 
Laboratory. 

220. Sex and Sexuality. 3 cr. 

Consideration of sex and reproduction as univer- 
sal biological functions and special emphasis on 
physiological and psychological basis of human 
sexuality. The course also aims to examine sexual 
functioning, sexual behavior and sex therapy. Not 
for Biology Major credit. Lecture. 



226. Genetics 

See description under Major Courses. 



4 cr. 



230. Stress and Adaptation. 3 cr. 

A study of the biological effects of acute and 
chronic stress stimuli of various origins, and the 
neuro and hormonal regulations associated with 
adaptation to stress. Not for Biology Major credit. 
Lecture. 

MAJOR COURSES 

Except for 398 and 399, all courses for majors also 
are open to non-majors, providing that individual 
course prerequisites are satisfied. 

Ill, 112. General Biology. 4 cr. each 

Introduction to the scientific study of life at the 
molecular, cellular and organismal level. It 
involves consideration of relevant structure, func- 
tion, development, reproduction, inheritance, 
evolution and ecology. This course provides the 
basic information and concept necessary for 
understanding living systems, their activity and 
interrelationships. 1 1 1 is prerequisite to 112. Lec- 
ture and laboratory. 

203. Microbiology. 4 cr. 

Introduction to microorganisms, their morphol- 
ogy, metabolism, ecology, and cultural characteris- 
tics, with emphasis on their interaction with other 



organisms, including man. Principles of medical 
and health related aspects of microbiology, chemo- 
therapy, industrial, agricultural and marine 
microbiology are presented. Prerequisites: Biology 
111, 112, and organic chemistry (or concurrent 
registration). Lecture and laboratory. 

226. Genetics. 4 cr. 

A study of the mechanisms of the inheritance and 
their resulting effects on individuals and popula- 
tions, including their implications in the life of 
man. Principles and details, methods and applica- 
tions are illustrated with specific examples drawn 
from a wide range of species, from microorga- 
nisms to man. Prerequisites: 107, 108, or 1 1 1, 1 12. 
Lecture and laboratory. 

232. Vertebrate Macrostructure. 4 cr. 

A comparative study of the gross structure of 
vertebrates and the relationship of that structure 
to function and evolution. Prerequisites: 111,112. 
Lecture and laboratory. 

238. Vertebrate Microstructure. 4 cr. 

A study of tissue and organ structure and the rela- 
tionship of that structure to function. Prerequi- 
sites: 111, 112 and 232 or permission of the 
instructor. Lecture and laboratory. 

244. Animal Development. 4 cr. 

A comparative study of the morphological and 
physiological aspects of animal development 
emphasizing current experimental approaches. 
Prerequisites: 111, 112. Lecture and laboratory. 

250. Plant Development 4 cr. 

Examines the unique features of representative 
types of plants, as revealed by interrelationships of 
form, function and morphogenesis. Prerequisites: 
111, 112. Lecture and laboratory. 

306. Plant Physiology. 4 cr. 

Varied studies of the growth requirements and reg- 
ulatory mechanisms of important plant types, with 
emphasis upon environmental control. Prerequi- 
sites: 111, 112 and 250. Lecture and laboratory. 

312. Animal Physiology 4 cr. 

Examination of the physiological mechanisms of 
body function in animals, including consideration 
of the basic components of biological control sys- 
tems and the manner in which various organ sys- 
tems contribute to the maintenance of physiologi- 
cal homeostasis. Prerequisites: 111, 112. Lecture 
and laboratory. 

318. Physiology of Reproduction. 4 cr. 

The course includes the anatomy, histology, physi- 
ology, biochemistry and endocrinology of verte- 
brate reproduction. The main emphasis is on the 
physiology of puberty, estrous and menstrual 
cycle, conception, pregnancy and parturition. The 
physiological basis of fertility and infertility also 
are included. Prerequisites: 111, 112, and 232 or 
244. Lecture and laboratory. 



324. Regulatory Physiology. 4 cr. 

A treatment of physiological and environmental 
regulations with emphasis on neuroendocrine inte- 
gration and adaptation. Prerequisites: 111, 112. 
Lecture and laboratory. 

332. Immunology and Virology. 4 cr. 

Introduction to viruses and immunology, with 
emphasis on host-parasite interactions and pat- 
terns of infectious diseases in populations. Prereq- 
uisites: Biology 111. 112. and organic chemis- 
try (or concurrent registration). Lecture and 
laboratory. 

334. Diagnostic Microbiology. 3 cr. 

A course to acquaint the student with the methods 
employed on clinical samples by clinical laborato- 
ries in the isolation and identification of microbial 
agents which cause human disease. Cultural as 
well as serological techniques are included. 
Emphasis is on the interpretation and significance 
of laboratory findings in the diagnosis of microbial 
disease, specially useful in medical technology, 
nursing and allied fields. Prerequisites: 111, 112; 
and 203 or equivalent or permission of the 
instructor. Lecture and laboratory. 

336. Human Parasitology. 3 cr. 

Principles of parasitism, epidemiology and life 
cycles of human parasitic protozoans and hel- 
minths, specially useful in allied health fields. Pre- 
requisites: introductory biology and a course in 
animal physiology or ecology, or permission of the 
instructor. Lecture and laboratory. 

395. Special Topics. 1-3 cr. 

Treatment of topics of current or special interest 
in biology. Lecture, laboratory or combinations. 

398, 399. Undergraduate Research. 2 cr. each 

Opportunity for selected students to work in the 
laboratory on research problems under the direc- 
tion of a faculty member. 398 is not prerequisite to 

399. Maximum of four credits. Registration by 
permission of instructor. Laboratory. 

411. Ecology. 4 cr. 

The goal is to provide an overall grasp of the prin- 
ciples and procedures underlying ecological 
thought. Past, present and future aspects of envi- 
ronmental studies arc considered from the ecosys- 
tem viewpoint. Interrelationships of living things 
with each other as well as the non-living compo- 
nents emphasize the need for inter-disciplinary 
studies and quantitative data. Both terrestrial and 



aquatic habitats are used to illustrate concepts 
such as growth, niche, succession and completion. 
Applicability to current human problems is dis- 
cussed: such as waste disposal, pollution, food, 
fuel, agriculture and urbanization. Prerequisites: 
111, 112. Lecture and laboratory. 

430. Animal Behavior. 3 cr. 

Introductory survey of the behavior of animals 
from an evolutionary perspective. Selected topics 
include natural selection and behavioral genetics, 
instinct and learning, behavioral ontogeny, orien- 
tation and navigation, behavior adaptations for 
survival and reproduction, animal communica- 
tion, social organization, and the evolution of 
social behavior. Lecture. 

431. Animal Behavior Laboratory. 1 cr. 

Emphasis is on experimental design, methodology, 
statistical techniques, and the writing of scientific 
papers. Prerequisites: a course in animal behavior, 
behavioral ecology, or concurrent registration in 
the same. Laboratory. 

444. Cell Physiology. 4 cr. 

A study of cells with regard to: means of obtaining 
energy including respiration, fermentation, and 
photosynthesis; work done by the cell including 
biosynthesis, active transport, and cell movement; 
cell growth and differentiation; relationships of 
cell structure to these processes. Prerequisites: 111, 
112 and organic chemistry. Lecture and 
laboratory. 

Descriptions of the Following Courses are Pro- 
vided in the Graduate School Catalog. 

500. Biotechnology: Lab Techniques. 3 cr. 

501. Biotechnology: Research Skills. 3 cr. 
503. Cell and Electron Microscopy. 3 cr. 
505. Molecular Genetics. 3 cr. 

511. Comparative Vertebrate Physiology. 3 cr. 

512. Mammalian Physiology. 3 cr. 

513. General Endocrinology. 3 cr. 
520. Experimental Embryology. 3 cr. 
524. Immunology. 3 cr. 
526. Pathogenic Microbiology. 3 cr. 
528. Microbial Physiology. 3 cr. 
531. Biology of Fungi. 3 cr. 
535. Microbiology Seminar. 1 cr. 
573. Behavioral Ecology. 3 cr. 
577. Evolutionary Ecology. 3 cr. 
580. Urban Ecology. 3 cr. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Chairman: Andrew J. Glaid, III, Ph.D. 

The Chemistry program is designed to provide the student with a fundamental background in chemistry and 
an understanding of the relationship of chemistry to the other sciences and disciplines. Elective courses and 
the opportunity to do undergraduate research allow the chemistry major to develop interests in a specialized 
area of chemistry, such as analytical, inorganic, organic, physical chemistry, and biochemistry. 

Because of the fundamental nature of chemistry as a science, numerous opportunities for advanced study, 
as well as employment, arc open to chemistry and biochemistry majors. A large percentage of students elect 
to continue their study in graduate programs in chemistry and related fields. Chemists and biochemists 
provide a core of personnel in pure and applied research, technical sales, technical libraries, management 



23 



positions in the chemical and related industries, the space industry, education, the environmental sciences 
and the health professions, such as medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine. The major in biochemistry 
centers around the core of basic chemistry courses while also providing advanced courses in biochemistry 
and electives in biology. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY MAJORS 

Thirty-two semester hours are required. All students must take 121, 122, 221, 222, 321, 323, and 421; 
Mathematics 115, 116; Physics 201, 202 or 21 1, 212; Biology 111, 112; proficiency in German, Russian or 
French at the 202 or 212 level is required. 

If a student takes 111, 112, and 121, 122 chemistry courses, the credits for the 111, 112 will not apply to 
the total required for the degree. Courses 101, 102; 205, 206 will not be counted toward a major. 

Chemistry Major: All students must take 322, 324, 422 and Mathematics 215. 

Biochemistry Major: All students must take 401, 524. In addition, Chemistry 525 and 526 may be taken as 
electives. Students planning to enter a graduate chemistry department should take 322, 324. 

Students who intend to work in industry after graduation are strongly advised to take 548 Industrial 
Organic Chemistry, and 549 Principles of Polymer Science. 

To meet the American Chemical Society's requirements for Professional Certification, the Chemistry 
Major must elect two additional courses from the following: 401, 523, 524, 537, 538, 545, 546, 547, 548, 572; 
Mathematics 216 or 308; Biology 505; Pharmacy Sciences 539 and Physics 306; one of these must be a 
laboratory course. This laboratory requirement can also be fulfilled with 490. The Biochemistry Major must 
take 322, 324, and 422 for certification. Course disciplines of the 500 level courses can be found in the 
Graduate School catalogue. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINORS 

A minor in Chemistry consists of 12 credit hours beyond 121, 122. A minor in Biochemistry consists of 12 
credits, beyond 121, 122. Normally 205, 206 or 221, 222, along with 401, will constitute the Biochemistry 
minor. 



101, 102. Chemistry and Society. 



3 cr. each 



The impact of chemistry on society reaches every 
phase of life. The course attempts to provide a link 
between chemistry and the changes in our techno- 
logical society. In the first semester, the basic con- 
cepts of chemistry are developed for the non-sci- 
ence student and applied to current topics such as 
air and water pollution, energy, pesticides, etc. 
The second semester deals with the biochemistry 
of living systems. Chemical principles are used to 
explain the normal life processes of photosynthe- 
sis, respiration, etc. as well as abnormal conditions 
such as drug action, poisons, etc. on metabolic 
processes. Students with a good high school back- 
ground do not require the first semester as a pre- 
requisite; others should see the instructor before 
registering for the second semester. Lecture, three 
hours. 

Ill, 112. Principles of Chemistry. 4 cr. each 

The course is divided into three segments, physi- 
cal, organic, and biochemistry. In the section 
devoted to physical chemistry the laws of chemical 
behavior are developed with particular reference 
to the simple molecules of inanimate nature. The 
organic section deals primarily with the structural 
features of organic compounds, the chemistry of 
functional groups and the practical applications of 
organic compounds in the synthesis of polymers, 
of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, 
enzymes, vitamins, etc. Biochemistry is treated in 
terms of the digestion and metabolism of nutri- 
ents, the function of enzymes in the metabolic 
process and the abnormal metabolic conditions 
that prevail in disease. Lecture, three hours; Reci- 
tation, one hour; Laboratory, two hours. 



121, 122. General Chemistry. 

The fundamental principles and concepts of chem- 
istry are presented from the standpoint of atomic 
and molecular structure with illustrative examples 
from descriptive chemistry. The basic concepts of 
thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and equilib- 
rium are introduced. The laboratory portion of the 
first semister illustrates physical and chemical 
properties in a quantitative manner, and the labo- 
ratory portion of the second semester illustrates 
the principle of ionic equilibria including qualita- 
tive inorganic analysis. 

121. Lecture, three hours; Recitation, 

one hour; Laboratory, three hours. 4 cr. 

122. Lecture, three hours; Recitation, 

one hour; Laboratory, six hours. 5 cr. 

205, 206; 221, 222. Organic 

Chemistry. 4 cr. each. 

The theoretical background is developed from the 
standpoint of the electronic structure of molecules 
and the accompanying energy considerations. The 
preparation and the chemical and physical 
(including spectral) properties of representative 
organic compounds are discussed in detail. Prereq- 
uisites: 121, 122. For 205, 206, Lecture, three 
hours; Recitation, one hour; Laboratory, four 
hours; and for 221, 222, Lecture, three hours; Rec- 
itation, one hour; Laboratory, six hours. 

321, 322. Physical Chemistry. 3 cr. each 

A study of the structure and properties of the vari- 
ous states of matter, thermodynamics, thermo- 
chemistry, kinetics and an introduction to chemi- 
cal physics. Prerequisites: Physics 202 or 212, 
Chemistry 122, Mathematics 116. Lecture, four 
hours. 



24 



323, 324. Physical Chemistry 

Laboratory. 1 cr. each 

Laboratory portion of Chemistry 321, 322, four 
hours. 

326. The Computer in Chemistry. 3 cr. 

The computer will be introduced as a tool in the 
solution of problems from the fields of analytical, 
biological, inorganic, organic, and physical chem- 
istry. The student will progress from the use of the 
computer as a black box problem solver to the 
design and coding of programs to solve problems 
in his field of interest. Experimental design and 
analysis will be introduced by library programs 
which permit the computer to simulate laboratory 
equipment in the production of experimental data. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 321. Lecture, three hours. 

401. Introductory Biochemistry. 4 cr. 

An introduction to biochemistry at the cellular 
level. The structure and chemistry of cellular com- 
ponents (proteins, nucleic acids, etc.), of cellular 
reagents (enzymes, coenzymes, respiratory pig- 
ments, etc.) and metabolic reactions of carbohy- 
drates, lipids and amino acids are discussed. Pre- 
requisite: 206 or 222. Lecture, three hours; 
Laboratory, four hours. 



421. Analytical Chemistry. 4 cr. 

Theoretical and practical training in modern 
methods in chemical analysis with emphasis on 
instrumental methods. Prerequisite: 322. Lecture, 
three hours; Laboratory, eight hours. 



422. Inorganic Chemistry. 4 cr. 

A survey of the basic principles required for 
understanding inorganic chemistry including 
atomic and molecular structure, crystal structure, 
non-aqueous solvents and coordination com- 
pounds. Prerequisite: 322. Lecture, three hours; 
Laboratory, four hours. 



490. Undergraduate Research. Maximum 2 cr. 

Selected students work on a research problem 
under the direction of a staff member. 



524. Molecular Basis of Biochemistry. 3 cr. 

A discussion of the chemistry of amino acids and 
proteins from the viewpoint of structure, physical 
chemistry and analysis. An introduction to 
enzyme chemistry is also included in the course. 
Prerequisite: 401. 



DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS 

Chairman: Lawrence E. Gaichas, Ph.D. 1984-1986 

The study of Classics is a unique discipline. It is not the study of a language or literature alone. It is rather 
the investigation of one of the world's inspired civilzations, the Graeco-Roman world. As such, it offers the 
student insight into the broadest aspects of human existence set in a perspective distant enough from his 
own to expand significantly his understanding and appreciation of humanity's aspirations, failures, and 
occasional triumphs. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS 

The Department offers four major programs: Classical Latin, Classical Greek, Classical Languages (knowl- 
edge of both Latin and Greek required), and Classical Civilization (no knowledge of Greek/Latin required). 
Credits applied to any major must be at the 200 level or above. 

1 ) The Classical Latin major requires at least eighteen credits in Latin as well as six credits of ancient 
history or ancient literature courses in English. 

2) The Classical Greek major requires at least eighteen credits in Greek as well as six credits in ancient 
history or ancient literature courses in English. 

3) The Classical Languages major requires at least twenty-four credits in Latin and Greek (with a 
minimum of twelve credits in each) in addition to six credits of ancient history or ancient literature courses 
in English. The Survey of Sanskrit Literature (211-212) may be substituted for the twelve credits of either 
Latin or Greek. 

4) The Classical Civilization major is an individually designed program of twenty-four credits of ancient 
literature, history, art, and archeology. Students majoring in Classical Civilization create programs with the 
close advice and the approval of the Classics Department to fit their backgrounds, interests, and career 
objectives. Majors should formulate programs with balanced history and literature components. They are 
strongly encouraged to fulfill the College language requirement in either Latin or Greek. All courses in Greek 
or Latin at the 200 level or above apply to the Classical Civilization Major. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

The Department offers a minor in Latin (a minimum of 12 credits above the 100 level); a minor in Greek (a 
minimum of 12 credits above the 100 level); and a minor in Classical Civilization with concentrations in 
Greek Civilization, Roman Civilization, Ancient History, and Ancient Art and Literature (12 credits above 
the 100 level) with approval of the Department and advisors. 



25 



101, 102. Elementary Classical 

Latin. 4 cr. each 

Study of the fundamentals of Latin grammar and 
syntax combined with occasional exercises in 
translation from Roman authors. 

103, 104. Elementary Classical 

Greek. 4 cr. each 

Study of the fundamentals of Greek grammar and 
syntax combined with frequent exercises on trans- 
lation from Greek authors. 

105, 106. Basic Sanskrit. 3 cr. each 

A study of the fundamentals of Sanskrit grammar 
and syntax combined with exercises in translation. 
Some previous foreign language experience is 
desirable. 

107, 108. Elementary Ecclesiastical 

Latin. 3 cr. each 

Study of the fundamentals of Latin grammar and 
syntax as represented in Scripture and Church 
Fathers. 

201, 202. Intermediate Classical 

Latin. 3 cr. each 

Survey of major Latin authors. 

203, 204. Intermediate Classical 

Greek. 3 cr. each 

Survey of major Greek authors. 

205, 206. Intermediate Ecclesiastical 

Latin. 3 cr. each 

Selections from Biblical and Christian Latin 
literature. 

207, 208. Biblical and Patristic 

Greek. 3 cr. each 

Selections from Biblical and Christian Greek 
literature. 

211, 212. Survey of Sanskrit 

Literature. 3 cr. each 

Selected readings from major Sanskrit texts 
including the Mahabharata, Hitopadesa, 
Kathasaritsagara, Manavadharmasastra, Rigveda, 

and Mcghaduta. 

The following will be taught as Latin or Greek 
courses or. for those students who are qualified, as 
combination Latin and Greek courses. 

Each course will cover an individual author or 
group of authors or a genre. Each course may be 
repeated as long as a different author or work is 
read. 

301. Pre-Fifth Century. 3 cr. 

The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Homeric Hymns, 
Hesiod. Pindar, and Greek lyric poetry. 

302. Fifth Century. 3 cr. 

Herodotus. Thucydides. Aeschylus, Sophocles, 
Euripides and Aristophanes. 

303. Fourth Century. 3 cr. 

Greek orators. Plato. Aristotle, Xenophon, 
Menander. 



304. Alexandrian Period. 3 cr. 

Apollonius Rhodius, Theocritus, Callimachus and 
the lesser Alexandrian authors. 

305. Roman Republic. 3 cr. 

Plautus, Terence, Cicero, Lucretius, Catullus, Cae- 
sar, and Sallust. 

306. Augustan Literature. 3 cr. 

Livy, Vergil, Horace, Ovid, Propertius, and 
Tibullus. 

307. Imperial Literature. 3 cr. 

Seneca, Lucan, Petronius, Martial, Plutarch, 
Tacitus, Juvenal, Pliny the Younger, Suetonius, 
Apuleius, and Lucian. 

308. Post Classical Literature. 3 cr. 

Post classical, medieval, renaissance and neo- 
Latin authors. 

309. Studies in Genre. 3 cr. 

Selected genre of Greek and/or Latin literature. 



400. Independent Readings and 
Research. 



Var. cr. 



CLASSICS COURSES IN ENGLISH: 
(NO GREEK OR LATIN REQUIRED) 

121. General Etymology. 3 cr. 

A study of Greek and Latin words to facilitate the 
comprehension of modern English as it is written 
by our acknowledged modern masters. 

122. Etymology of Scientific Terms 3 cr. 

Introduction to Greek and Latin elements of sci- 
entific terminology. 

123. Classical Mythology. 3 cr. 

A presentation of the major myths of Greece and 
Rome with special attention to contemporary 
interpretations of myth and the influence of myth 
on art and literature. 

124. World Mythology. 3 cr. 

Investigation of the dominant themes of non- 
Classical mythologies with special reference to 
Near Eastern, Celtic, Teutonic, African, and 
American Indian myths. 

219. Computer Use in the Humanities. 3 cr. 

A survey of non-scientific applications of com- 
puters in the humanities. 

230. Ancient Theatre 3 cr. 

An examination of the origins and development of 
ancient tragedy and comedy. Readings from the 
works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aris- 
tophanes, Menander, Plautus, Terence and 
Seneca. 

231. Ancient Epic. 3 cr. 

A study of ancient epic literature with particular 
attention to the techniques of oral and literary 
composition. Readings from the works of Homer, 
Apollonius of Rhodes, Vergil, and Lucan. 

232. Ancient Novel and Romance. 3 cr. 

Survey of Greek and Roman prose fiction with 
special emphasis on the nature and development 



26 



of narrative techniques. Readings from Homer, 
Herodotus, Xenophon, Apollonius of Rhodes, the 
Greek Romances, Lucian, Petronius, and 
Apuleius. 

233. Ancient Satire. 3 cr. 

Investigation of the satirical element in classical 
literature with special reference to the writings of 
Lucian, Lucilius, Horace, Persius, Martial, and 
Juvenal. 

240. Greek Religion. 3 cr. 

An examination of the continuity of Greek reli- 
gious experience from ancient times to the present 
and of the interconnection of ancient Greek reli- 
gious ritual, moral experience and religious 
thought. 

241. Roman Religion. 3 cr. 

A study of Roman religious beliefs and practices 
with attention to the development of hero cults, 
oriental mystery religions and philosophical sects 
as alternatives to traditional religion. 

242. Ancient Law. 3 cr. 

An historical survey, including the contributions 
of the Babylonians and the Greeks, of Roman Law 
between c. 500 B.C. and A.D. 500. 

244. History of Ancient Medicine. 3 cr. 

Examination of the most significant medical theo- 
ries and practices in the period from the Egyptian 
temple physicians to the doctors of the Roman 
Empire. Special attention will be given to Hip- 
pocrates and Galen. 

245. Greek History. 3 cr. 

An examination of the development of Greek his- 
tory and culture from earliest times up to the 
death of Alexander of Macedon. 

246. Hellenistic History. 3 cr. 

A survey of Mediterranean history from the death 
of Alexander until the accession of Octavian and 
the establishment of the Roman principate. 

247. History of the Roman Principate. 3 cr. 

Study of the consolidation of the Roman imperial 
structure from Augustus to the death of 
Commodus. 

248. History of the Late Roman 

Empire. 3 cr. 

Examination of Roman history from the ascension 
of Severus to the death of Justinian. 



249. Egyptian Civilization. 3 cr. 

A survey of Egyptian history and culture from the 
pre-dynastic period to the establishment of 
Roman rule in Egypt. Special attention will be 
given to the artistic, literary, and religious achieve- 
ments of Egypt. 

250. Classical Archaeology. 3 cr. 

A study of the archaeological discovery of classical 
civilization from the Greek Bronze Age through 
the Roman Empire. An introduction to the tech- 
niques of archaeological investigation. 

260. The Classical Tradition in 

America. 3 cr. 

A study of the influences of Graeco-Roman civili- 
zation on American cultural life. 

261. Contemporary Literature 

and Classics. 3 cr. 

An investigation of the influence of ancient myth 
on 20th century French, German, Italian, English 
and American Literature. 



300. Seminar. 

Topics variable. 



3cr. 



301. Greek Art. 3 cr. 

A study of the architecture, sculpture, vase paint- 
ing, and minor arts of the Greek world from 
Minoan to Hellenistic times. The student is intro- 
duced to the extensive vocabulary of Greek art 
which has been a continuing formative force in 
Western art. (Offered in alternate years) 

302. Roman Art. 3 cr. 

An introduction to Roman innovations in archi- 
tecture, sculpture, and painting. The background 
of Roman art in Etruscan, Greek, and Egyptian 
civilizations in investigated, and the impact of 
Roman art in formulating Christian Art. Renais- 
sance Art and Neo-Classicism is analyzed. 
(Offered in alternate years) 

305. History of Medicine. 3 cr. 

A survey exploring the development of medicine 
in the western world in terms of medicine as an art 
and as a science. The latter part of the course will 
focus on the social and institutional aspects in the 
development of American medicine. 



DIVISION OF COMPUTER SCIENCE 

The curriculum in Computer Science is designed to allow maximum flexibility in direction. In conjunction 
with an appropriate minor, the degree in Computer Science provides excellent preparation for graduate 
work in Computer Science as well as the preparation sought by the scientific and business world. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

A minimum of 30 semester hours is required for a major. These must include the core courses 1 12, 201 and 
202 with the remaining courses selected from those numbered 300 and above. Extradepartmental require- 
ments: English 385 Professional and Technical Writing, Math 115, 116. Contact the Computer Science 
Division for extradepartmental requirements in particular area of concentration. 



27 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

A minimum of 18 semester hours is required for the minor. These must include the core courses 112, 201 
and 202 and 9 hours of computer science selected from courses numbered 300 and above. 

Note: Many of the courses in the Computer Science Division may be taken as electives by those not enrolled 
in the major or minor programs. Any such selections, however, must be cleared by the advisor through a 
representative of the Computer Science Division. 



100. Elements of Computer Science. 3 cr. 

A computer appreciation course, covering a sur- 
vey of computer organization, computer languages 
and the history of computers. Not counted toward 
computer science major or minor. 

101. Introduction to Computer 
Science/Basic. 3 cr. 

An introductory course for those who have had no 
prior computer science courses or those seeking a 
general introduction to computers. Machine lan- 
guage, assembly language and Basic are among the 
topics covered. Not counted toward the computer 
science major or minor. 

102. COBOL. 3 cr. 

Structured programming principles and tech- 
niques are introduced using the COBOL language. 
Topics discussed are top down techniques, pro- 
gram and project documentation, file structure 
and the organization of programming languages. 

111. FORTRAN. 3 cr. 

Elements of FORTRAN skills to construct algo- 
rithms for efficient solution of computational 
problems are presented. Recommended for those 
in science and pre-engineering. 

112. Pascal. 3 cr. 

This course develops the student's skills in the use 
of procedure oriented languages, and emphasizes 
structured programming. 

201. Machine Language Programming. 3 cr. 

A survey of various machine configurations. Top- 
ics include number systems, machine language 
programming, assemblers and macro-assemblers. 
Prerequisite: 112 Pascal. 

202. Data Structures. 3 cr. 

Introduction to the theory of graphs and trees and 
their realization as computer programs. A thor- 
ough study of data structures and algorithms for 
their manipulation. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 Fortran. 

301. Computer Logic. 3 cr. 

Basic concepts used in the design and analysis of 
digital systems. Required course for 302. Prerequi- 
site: 1 12 Pascal. 

302. Computer Organization. 3 cr. 

An introduction to current system structures of 
control, communications, memories, processors 
and I/O devices. Prerequisite: 201 Machine Lan- 
guage Programming, 301 Computer Logic. 

305. Introduction to File Processing. 3 cr. 

This course is designed to introduce concepts and 
techniques of structuring data on bulk storage 
devices, to provide experience in the use of bulk 



storage devices and to provide the foundation for 
applications of data structures and file processing 
techniques. Prerequisite: 112 Pascal, 202 Data 
Structures. 

306. Introduction to Operating 

Systems. 3 cr. 

I/O Hardware, properties of magnetic tapes, discs, 
drums, associative memories, virtual address 
translation techniques, batch processing, time 
sharing, scheduling, resource allocation are among 
the topics covered. Prerequisite: 201 Machine 
Language Programming, 202 Data Structures. 

307. Numerical Methods of 

Linear Systems. 3 cr. 

This course deals with basic algorithms of numeri- 
cal computation of linear algebra. The use of 
mathematical subroutine packages are included. 
This course is identical to Math 307. It may be 
used to satisfy either a Math or Computer Science 
requirement but not both. Prerequisite: knowledge 
of BASIC, FORTRAN or Pascal is required, Math 
116 and Math 306. 

308. Numerical Methods of 

Classical Analysis. 3 cr. 

Introduces the basic algorithms of numerical com- 
putation, their theoretical foundations, and practi- 
cal applications. Programming assignments are 
made to demonstrate the algorithm, the related 
theory, the benefits and the pitfalls associated with 
the method. Identical to Math 308. May be used to 
satisfy either a Math or Computer Science require- 
ment but not both. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 Fortran or 
112 Pascal and Math 215. 

309. Computers and Society. 3 cr. 

A course designed to keep the student abreast of 
the current state of the art of computer science and 
technology and of the role that computers play in 
society. This seminar format course will discuss 
the uses and misuses of computers in society and 
will underline the basic assumptions, values and 
ethics which should govern the use of computer 
systems. 

311. Data Base Management 

Systems Design. 3 cr. 

Introduction of data base concepts and approaches 
to data base management. Topics include choice 
and design of data structures, design of user ori- 
ented languages for updating and retrieving infor- 
mation constraints and problems associated with 
the use of generalized data management systems. 
Prerequisite: 102 Cobol, 202 Data Structure, and 
305 Intro to File Processing. 



28 



312. Artificial Intelligence. 3 cr. 

Introduction to the theory of abstract mathemati- 
cal machines. Structured and behavioral classifica- 
tion of automata, finite state automata, theory of 
regular sets, turning machines are among topics 
considered. Prerequisite: 202 Data Structure. 

414. Software Design and Development. 3 cr. 

An overview of system software. Examination of 
design and development of macro assemblers, 
compilers and control program functions. Prereq- 
uisite: 302, 306. 

415. Theory of Programming 

Languages. 3 cr. 

Comparative study of properties and applications 
of several higher level programming languages. 
Prerequisite: 1 12 Pascal and 202 Data Structure. 

419. Introduction to Micro and 

Mini Computers. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the designs of micro and mini 
computers. Exploration of assembler and special- 
ized languages for small computers. Prerequisites: 
201 Machine Language Programming and 301 
Computer Logic. 



420. Computer Simulation. 3 cr. 

The fundamentals of simulation via digital and 
analog computers will be presented. Modern 
development and solution by numerical and ana- 
lytical methods will be discussed in depth with 
emphasis on practical applications. Prerequisite: 
1 12 Pascal, and a course in statistics. 

421. Applications in Data Processing. 3 cr. 

Data handling in terms of coding, preparation, 
acquisition, summarization, and tabulation and 
analysis using packaged programs. Prerequisite: 
112 Pascal. 

423. Information Systems. 3 cr. 

Application of information systems to various 
areas as education, business, medicine, law and 
public administration. Any one of the areas will be 
studied in detail. Prerequisite: 202 Data Struc- 
tures. 

491-499. Selected Topics in 

Computer Science. 1-3 cr. 

Topics selected in consultation with the advisor 
and the division. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Chairman: Geza Grosschmid, J.U.D. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

Twenty-four semester hours are required for a major. These credits must include 221, 222, 321, and 322. 
Extradepart mental requirements: Mathematics 225 in the Mathematics Department of the College. Students 
planning to do graduate work in Economics are advised to take calculus. It is strongly recommended that 
students having economics as a major consult with the Economics Department for advisement. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

Eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in Economics. These credits must include 221, and 222. It 
is strongly recommended that students having economics as a minor consult with the Economics Depart- 
ment for advisement. 

Course Descriptions are provided in the School of Business and Administration Section of this Catalog on 
Pages 66-67. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Chairman: Joseph J. Keenan, Ph.D. 

The chief purpose of the English program is to develop the student's powers to think critically about his life. 
To this end the Department's curriculum unites intensive and critical reading in a broad range of our 
literary heritage with close attention to the presentation of ideas in writing. Attention is also given to oral 
expression of ideas by means of dialogue between professor and student. Not only is the degree in English an 
excellent preparation for law school and for graduate work in English, education, and library science, but it 
also provides the liberal preparation which is sought by the business world for such areas as personnel, 
advertising, and management. 

Prerequisites — English Composition 101 (or its equivalent) is a prerequisite for admission to English 
Composition 102; English Composition 102 (or its equivalent) is a prerequisite for admission to all other 
courses offered by the department. 

The English Department further advises that two 200 level courses should be taken before the student 
attempts any 300 or 400 level course (except for 308 and 407). 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

The major is an individually-designed program of 24 hours of English Department courses above the 100 
level. Each English major, with the close advice and approval of a member of the English faculty, designs a 



program to fit his background, interests, and career objectives. 



29 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

A minimum of 12 credit hours beyond the freshman level of which no more than six hours may be taken at 
the 200 level. 
There are five separate emphases from which the student must choose one. 

1. English Literature: 201, 202, and six hours in upper division English Literature, courses 409 through 
469. 

2. American Literature: 205, 206, and six hours in upper division American Literature, courses 471 
through 489. 

3. Literature and Film: "Introduction to Film" (3 hours) and nine hours in courses in literature and film. 
Examples are "Shakespeare on Film" and "American Short Story into Film." 

4. Writing: 203 and nine hours in 300 level Writing Workshops. 

5. English Honors: Students who, by invitation of the Department Honors Committee, complete English 
212, 213. and two 300 Honors Seminars, may count that program as an English Minor. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Students who give evidence of outstanding ability in English through their performance in English Composi- 
tion 101 or by virtue of superior national test scores will be invited to participate in the English Honors 
program at the discretion of the Department Honors Committee. 

These students may apply Honors course credits to either an English major or minor, or may use these 
credits as electives. Further details concerning the Honors program are available through the department 
office and will be distributed to all nominees at the time of their recommendation for admission to the 
program. 



101, 102. English Composition. 3 cr. each 

Practice in effective writing. Review of principles 
of grammar and rhetoric; introduction to literary 
types and forms. 101 is prerequisite to 102. 

103. English Composition Honors. 3 cr. 

An honors counterpart to 102. Composition and 
introduction to literary types and forms. Participa- 
tion by invitation only. 

201, 202. English Literature Survey. 3 cr. each 

Representative masterpieces of English literature 
in their literary and historical contexts. 

203. Advanced Writing. 3 cr. 

Designed to build upon writing skills learned in 
freshman composition centered chiefly on devel- 
opment of style and accuracy. 

205. American Literature Survey I — 
Beginning to Civil War. 3 cr. 

Representative selections from major American 
authors treated in both their literary and their his- 
torical contexts. 

206. American Literature Survey II — 

After Civil War. 3 cr. 

Representative selections from major American 
authors treated in both their literary and their his- 
torical contexts. 

207. The Novel. 3 cr. 

Introduction both to various types of novels and 
to the critical analysis of fiction. 

208. Poetry. 3 cr. 

Appreciation of British and American poetry: crit- 
ical analysis of traditional and experimental poetic 
form; consideration of philosophical and social 
concerns of poetry. 

209. Drama. 3 cr. 

An historical survey of major dramatic forms 
through a selection of representative works by 



major playwrights from the classical tradition of 
Greece and Rome to the Theatre of the Absurd. 

210, 211. Readings in World 

Literature I, II. 3 cr. each 

A survey of major literary works of the Western 
world from Homer to Cervantes (210) and from 
Moliere to Camus (211) with emphasis on conti- 
nental traditions. The course explores both the 
thematic preoccupations of Western writers and 
the development and evolution of literary forms. 

212, 213. English Literature 

Honors. 3 cr. each 

Honors counterparts to 201, 202. Major British 
writers from Chaucer to Eliot. Participation by 
invitation only. 

300. Honors Seminar. 3 cr. 

Special areas treated in these seminars will vary 
and will be designated in the schedule of courses 
each semester. Enrollment in the Honors Seminar 
is by invitation of the Honors Committee of the 
Department of English. 

308. Applied Linguistics. 3 cr. 

Practical uses of structural linguistics in the teach- 
ing of composition and literature. 

370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 

377, 378, 379. Special Studies in 

English or World Literature. 3 cr. each 

Two or three courses in this sequence are offered 
every semester by the English Department to meet 
the current interests of both the students and the 
faculty. Examples of courses regularly offered are 
Science Fiction: The English Bible and Literature; 
Comparative Literature: Modern Comparative 
Drama; Modern Short Story; Far Eastern Litera- 
ture; Forms of Fantasy; Introduction to Film; The 
Literature of Mystery and Detection. 



30 



380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 

387, 388, 389. Writing Workshops. 3 cr. each 

Courses in this sequence are offered each semester 
in a workshop format designed to develop stu- 
dents' creative and/or technical writing skills. 
Examples of courses regularly offered are Playwrit- 
ing, Poetry Workshop, Fiction Workshop, Writing 
for Business and Industry, Professional and Tech- 
nical Writing. Admission by instructor's permis- 
sion only. 

407. The English Language. 3 cr. 

An introduction to linguistic analysis with pri- 
mary emphasis on the history of the structure of 
English from old to modern English. 



The remainder of the English courses are 
divided into areas of emphasis. During a four- 
semester period, each course from each area will 
be offered at least once. 

Medieval Studies 

409. Chaucer. 3 cr. 

A study of The Canterbury Tales and minor 
poems. 

410. Medieval Special Topics. 3 cr. 

Studies in the ideas and attitudes of the medieval 
period approached through one of its dominant 
genres such as the romance, the drama, the lyric, 
etc. or through some of its major writers other 
than Chaucer or through international readings in 
Old and Middle English, Old Icelandic, Medieval 
French and German (all read in English transla- 
tion). 

Renaissance Studies 

413. Sixteenth Century English 

Literature. 3 cr. 

Survey including non-Shakespearean drama. Sid- 
ney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Marlowe and minor 
figures. 

414. Seventeenth Century English 

Literature. 3 cr. 

Survey of drama, prose, and poetry to 1660. 

415. Milton. 3 cr. 

A survey of Milton and his times. A close scrutiny 
of the minor poems, and Paradise Lost and Sam- 
son Agonistes. 

419. Renaissance Special Topics. 3 cr. 

Studies in Renaissance thought and aesthetic in 
the works of one or more of its great writers: Spen- 
ser, Sidney, Donne, Jonson, etc. or through the 
ideas and attitudes conveyed in one of the domi- 
nant genres of the Renaissance: the lyric, the epic, 
the drama, etc. 



434. Shakespeare II. 

Tragedies and histories. 



3cr. 



Shakespeare Studies 

433. Shakespeare I. 

Comedies and romances. 



3cr. 



439. Shakespeare Special Topics. 3 cr. 

Studies in Shakespeare relating his works to those 
of his contemporaries or concentrating on the 
problems of Shakespeare: biographical, aesthetic, 
and critical. Specific works and approaches to be 
selected by the instructor. 

Eighteenth Century Studies 

441. English Classicism. 3 cr. 

Developments of neo-classical literature from the 
Restoration to the death of Pope. Primary atten- 
tion given to Dryden, Swift and Pope. 

442. Late Eighteenth Century 

English Literature. 3 cr. 

Johnson and his circle, the development of the 
novel, the aesthetic movement. 

449. Eighteenth Century Special 

Topics. 3 cr. 

Studies in Eighteenth Century thought and aes- 
thetic in the works of one or more of its great 
writers: Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Blake, etc. 
or through the ideas and attitudes conveyed in one 
of the dominant genres of the Eighteenth Century: 
the drama, the novel, the essay, etc. 

Nineteenth Century Studies 

451. English Romantic Literature. 3 cr. 

A study of the aesthetic, moral, political, and liter- 
ary aspects of English romanticism approached 
through the writings of Wordsworth, Coleridge. 
Byron, Shelley, Keats. 

452. Victorian Literature. 3 cr. 

A study of the poetry of Tennyson, Browning, 
Arnold and the prose of Arnold, Carlyle and Rus- 
kin. Attention also given to the poetry of Morris, 
Rossetti and Fitzgerald. 

459. Nineteenth Century Special 

Topics. 3 cr. 

Studies in Nineteenth Century thought and aes- 
thetic in the works of one or more of its great 
writers such as Wordsworth, Tennyson, Browning, 
Dickens, Hardy; or through the ideas and attitudes 
conveyed in one of the dominant genres of the 
Nineteenth Century. 

Twentieth Century Studies 

461. Early Twentieth Century 

Literature. 3 cr. 

Selective study of authors representing the major 
literary types and trends from about 1890 to 1930; 
Hardy, Moore, Butler, Conrad, Yeats, Hopkins, 
and Joyce. 

463. Contemporary Literature. 3 cr. 

Major modern types and trends: Eliot, Woolf, 
Waugh, Greene, Auden, Spender, Thomas, Gold- 
ing, and others. 



31 



469. Twentieth Century Special 

Topics. 3 cr. 

Studies in Twentieth Century thought and aes- 
thetic in the works of one or more of its major 
writers such as Yeats, Joyce, Eliot; or through the 
ideas and attitudes conveyed in one of the domi- 
nant genres of the Twentieth Century. 

American Studies 

471. Early American Literature. 3 cr. 

A study of the literature of America's Colonial and 
Federalist periods, emphasizing the political and 
belletristic writings of an emerging nation. 

472. American Romanticism. 3 cr. 

A study of the Romantic movement in America 
with emphasis on Emerson, Thoreau, and Poe. 



473. American Realism. 3 cr. 

The rise of realistic fiction subsequent to the Civil 
War through the end of the century with emphasis 
on Twain, James and Howells. 

474. Modern American Literature. 3 cr. 

A study of American prose and poetry from the 
end of World War I to the present, including 
Frost, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Bellow, 
etc. 

480-489. American Literature 

Special Topics. 3 cr. 

Studies designed to reflect particular current inter- 
ests of faculty and students alike. Topics can be 
drawn from a wide range of areas such as histori- 
cal background, aesthetics, theme and motif; from 
specific studies of major authors or from tracing 
the development of dominant literary genres. 



499. Directed Studies. 



3cr. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Chairman: Jerome E. Janssen, M.A. 

The Department of History offers a program devoted to the study of mankind in diverse cultural settings 
through time. A large number of courses are taught by a faculty reflecting a variety of philosophical and 
methodological outlooks. Apart from the fact that the program fully meets the needs of students intending to 
pursue graduate work in historical studies, the history major will be well prepared for careers in law, 
business, or government services. Most importantly, the discipline of history provides an excellent synthesis 
of the liberal-arts education since it effectively joins together the humanities and the social sciences. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

A minimum of 30 credits must be taken including 103, 104 Development of the U.S. (six credits) and either 
213.214 Western Civilization (six credits) or 3 1 1 , 312 World History and the Historian (six credits). Twelve 
of the remaining credits must be taken from 200 and 300 level courses and six credits from 400 level 
courses. 

A maximum of 12 transfer credits in history can be applied to the major requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

Students who wish to minor in history may consult with the department's undergraduate advisor. The 
student is required to take 15 hours including 103, 104. 



Introductory Surveys 

103. Development of the United States 

to 1877. 3 cr. 

The historical development of American institu- 
tions, ideals, and society from earliest times to 

1877. 

104. Development of the United States 

since 1877. 3 cr. 

The historical development of American institu- 
tions, ideals, and society since 1877. 

Area Courses 

212. Europe in the Feudal Age. 3 cr. 

The world of the Middle Ages — a survey of medie- 
val man's political, social, and cultural activities. 

213, 214. Western Civilization. 3 cr. 

An introductory survey of the origins and charac- 
teristics of European Civilization, emphasizing the 
personalities and events and institutions that have 
made the West the dominant global power today. 



244. History of Ancient Medicine. 3 cr. 

Examination of the most significant medical theo- 
ries and practices in the period from the Egyptian 
temple physicians to the doctors of the Roman 
Empire. Special attention will be given to Hip- 
pocrates and Galen. 

245. Greek History. 3 cr. 

An examination of the development of Greek his- 
tory and culture from earliest times up to the 
death of Alexander of Macedon. 

246. Hellenistic History. 3 cr. 

A survey of Mediterranean history from the death 
of Alexander until the accession of Octavian and 
the establishment of the Roman principate. 

247. History of the Roman Principate. 3 cr. 

Study of the consolidation of the Roman imperial 
structure from Augustus to the death of Corn- 
modus. 

248. History of the Late Roman Empire. 3 cr. 

Examination of Roman History from the ascen- 
sion of Severus to the death of Justinian. 



32 



249. Egyptian Civilization. 3 cr. 

A survey of Egyptian history and culture from the 
pre-dynastic period to the establishment of 
Roman rule in Egypt. Special attention will be 
given to the artistic, literary, and religious achieve- 
ments of Egypt. 

254. The History of the Modern 

Middle East. 3 cr. 

A study of the modern Near East with concentra- 
tion upon the conflict between imperialism and 
nationalism, traditionalism and western influ- 
ences, in the area. 

255, 256. History of Asia I and II. 3 cr. each 

A survey of Asian civilization from ancient times 
to the present day, western colonialism; the rise of 
the nationalist movement; and the establishment 
of modern states. 

257, 258. Russian History. 3 cr. each 

Development of society and state in Russia from 
their origins to the twentieth century. 

259, 260. East-Central Europe. 3 cr. each 

The medieval and modern history of the small 
nations situated between Russia and Germany on 
the east and west, and the Baltic and Mediterra- 
nean Seas on the north and the south. 

266. Modern Britain. 3 cr. 

A study of the first industrial nation, with special 
attention to the achievement of constitutional 
monarchy, the social and economic problems of 
industrialization, the nature of British imperial- 
ism, and the problems faced in the 20th century. 

267. Canada. 3 cr. 

An introduction to Canadian history, with particu- 
lar attention to the years from 1 763 to the present, 
and to Canadian-American relations and contem- 
porary Canada. 

269, 270. China. 3 cr. 

A survey of social, economic, political, and cul- 
tural changes before and after the establishment of 
the People's Republic of China. 

271. Japan. 3 cr. 

An analysis of Japan's current cultural and eco- 
nomic development in light of its historical past, 
the Meiji era, and twentieth century expansion. 

Topical Surveys 

305. History of Medicine. 3 cr. 

A survey exploring the development of medicine 
in the western world in terms of medicine as an art 
and as a science. The latter part of the course will 
focus on the social and institutional aspects in the 
development of American medicine. 

307, 308. History of Science. 3 cr. each 

A survey exploring the significance of scientific 
developments within the historical and social con- 
text of Western culture. 



309. American Science and Technology. 3 cr. 

The development of science and technology in 
America from colonial times to the twentieth 
century. 

311, 312. World History and the 

Historian. 3 cr. each 

The course traces the main events of world history 
in relation to the most important theories of world 
history and in the context of an inquiry into the 
nature of historical understanding. The first 
semester treats prehistory, the emergence of civili- 
zation, and the world views of the major classical 
civilizations. The second semester is an inquiry 
into the nature of modernity. 

320. Special Studies in 

European History. 3 cr. 

Topic will be announced by the instructor. The 
course may be taken more than once. 

321. Special Studies in 

American History. 3 cr. 

Topic will be announced by the instructor. The 
course may be taken more than once. 

322. Special Studies in 

Third World History. 3 cr. 

Topic will be announced by the instructor. The 
course may be taken more than once. 

340. History of Western Law. 3 cr. 

Primary emphasis will be placed on the rise of 
customary law, especially its development in 
England into Common Law. 

341. History of American Law I. 3 cr. 

This course deals with the development of law, 
legal philosophy, and legal institutions in America 
from the colonial period to the Civil War. 

342. History of American Law II. 3 cr. 

This course deals with the development of law, 
legal philosophy, and legal institutions from the 
Civil War to the present. 

343. Church History I. 3 cr. 

A religious and historical exploration of the 
growth of Christianity from the first century up to 
the Reformation; discussion of those issues within 
the Church and the external forces which brought 
about major conflict and development. 

344. Church History II. 3 cr. 

Selected topics in Catholic and Protestant devel- 
opment from 1500 to the present day; special 
emphasis on the crises, revolutions, and reforms 
that were central to this development. 

345. American Church History. 3 cr. 

Emphasizes the historical development of major 
religious traditions in America, both Catholic and 
Protestant. Special attention will be given to "the 
life of the mind" of Christianity in America, the 
frontier expansion of religion, the often-controver- 
sial interaction between the Church and American 
culture, the place of religion in the creation of the 
American character, and the unique separation of 
church and state. 



3T 



347. War in Modern Society. 3 cr. 

A study and analysis of the phenomenon of war in 
the Western World from the Age of Napoleon to 
the present, with special emphasis upon the inter- 
relationship between international conflict and 
social, political, and technological change. 

352. Diplomatic History of United States. 3 cr. 

Emphasis is upon involvement of the United 
States in both World Wars and its role as an impe- 
rial power. 

357. History of the American 

Presidency. 3 cr. 

Primarily an investigation and evaluation — per- 
sonal, political, contemporary, and historical — of 
each president with some attention to the growth 
of the office. 

360. Constitutional History of the 

United States. 3 cr. 

An analysis of the Supreme Court and constitu- 
tional development, stressing the major controver- 
sies in the field. 

362. History of the United States' 

Political Parties Since 1868. 3 cr. 

A detailed examination and analysis of the origins, 
leadership, and operation of the major political 
parties since 1868. 

364. The American Mind. 3 cr. 

The origins, development and contemporary 
modes of American thought, including major ''cli- 
mates of opinion, " diverse movements, and 
selected scientific, political, religious, social, and 
artistic topics. 

366. The Modern Mind. 3 cr. 

The major ideological tendencies of modern Euro- 
pean thought and their connection to society and 
politics, and to the major philosophic and scien- 
tific currents of the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. 

370. Current History. 3 cr. 

What are the major forces affecting our lives 
today? Where do they come from? Where will they 
lead to? Resources will be current media such as 
newspapers, TV, etc. 

372. Asian Influences on America. 3 cr. 

From the quest for Asia by Columbus to the eco- 
nomic impact of twentieth century Japan, the Ori- 
ent has effected America, its social, cultural, eco- 
nomic, and technological development. 

373, 374. Diplomatic History of the 

Far East. 3 cr. each 

Western imperialism in Asia; rise of Asian nation- 
alism, analysis of international problems in cur- 
rent tension areas. 

375. History of Inner Asia. 3 cr. 

The history of Inner Asia from Genghis Khan's 
Mongol Empire to Leonid Brezhnev's Soviet 
Empire. 



378. Europe and International 

Politics, 1870-1970. 3 cr. 

A study of global international relations since 
1870, with emphasis upon the evolution from a 
European centered world to global politics. 

382. Psychohistory. 3 cr. 

Examines the inter-relationships between psychol- 
ogy — especially psychoanalysis — and history. Psy- 
chology leadership of group behavior, or war, etc. 

385. Women in History. 3 cr. 

A survey of the historical experience of women, 
from ancient times, with emphasis on the forces 
that have led to the modern changes in women's 
status. 

386. Historical Geography. 3 cr. 

A survey of the physical world which is the basis 
for a human civilization, past, present, and future. 
What are the possibilities and limitations of differ- 
ent places for human development? How success- 
ful or unsuccessful were human settlements? 
Emphasis also on geography as an intellectual dis- 
cipline and cultural phenomenon. 

389. Europe: Industrialism and 

the Masses. 3 cr. 

A historical analysis of Europe in the last two cen- 
turies with particular attention to the relationship 
between technological and social change and its 
impact on politics and culture. 

394. History of U.S. Labor 

Management Relations. 3 cr. 

Concentrates chiefly on the relations between 
worker and employer from the early craftsmen to 
the industrial union member. 

395. Pittsburgh and the American City. 3 cr. 

The rise of Urban America, using Pittsburgh as a 
case study of city growth and change, industriali- 
zation, immigration, and renewal in the twentieth 
century. 

396. Immigration and Ethnic Identity. 3 cr. 

An examination of the dynamics of immigration 
to the United States with emphasis on the new 
immigration at the turn of the century. 

398. Economic History of the 

United States. 3 cr. 

Investigates the economic development of the 
United States, emphasizing its impact on social 
and political issues as background for current eco- 
nomic problems. 

Specialized Areas and Topics 

458. Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 cr. 

An intensive study of the American experience 
before and after the War for the Union. 

467. Science and Society in the 

Twentieth Century. 3 cr. 

The economic, social and cultural consequences of 
the rise of modern science. 



34 



479. Revolution in the Modern World. 3 cr. 

An analysis of the major political and social revo- 
lutions in Europe since 1789, the nature of the 
revolutionary phenomenon, and the inevitable 
counter-revolutionary trend. 

480. European Fascism. 3 cr. 

An intensive study of the major fascist move- 
ments and regimes of the twentieth century in 
light of the political, economic, social, intellectual, 
and psychological tensions which produced them. 

481. The Modern Historian. 3 cr. 

The development of modern historical thinking 
and scholarship as it is related to the major intel- 
lectual and social currents of modern times. 



487. The American Frontier. 3 cr. 

An historical view of man's attempts to create new 
societies, concentrating upon ecological issues, 
frontier experiences, and Utopian ventures. 

489. The Search for Identity — 

United States since 1945. 3 cr. 

A discussion of selected contemporary issues, for- 
eign and domestic, which illustrate the identity 
crisis in the U.S. 



490. Honors Seminar I. 

491. Honors Seminar II. 

499. Directed Reading, Selected 
Historical Topics. 



3cr. 
3cr. 

3cr. 



DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

Acting Chairman: Paul Krakowski, M.A. 

The Department of Journalism encourages the liberal education of a student by emphasizing how a 
professional education for a career in the mass media relies on the liberal arts tradition. The journalism 
curriculum concentrates upon the development of communicative skills for creative and responsible posi- 
tions in such areas of mass communication as advertising, broadcasting, newspapers, public relations, 
magazines and specialized publications. A transfer student must take at least 12 credits from the department 
to graduate as a major. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

Twenty-seven semester hours are required for a major. Required courses are: 167, 267, 268, 367, 369, 372 or 
376, and 466 or 468 or 470 or 476. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

Eighteen semester hours credit are required for a minor. Credits must include: 167, 267, 268, and nine other 
journalism credits approved by the head of the Department of Journalism. Minors do not qualify for the 
Department's Professional Internship program. 



167. Introduction to Mass 

Communications. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the role, principles, and 
responsibilities of newspapers, broadcasting, 
magazines, advertising and public relations. A 
series of guest speakers from these fields is 
included. Course open to non-majors. (Offered 
both semesters.) 

199. Language for Journalists. 3 cr. 

Aimed at improving and polishing language skills 
of prospective or beginning majors. Emphasis on 
word usage, grammar, spelling. Introduction to 
style and copy symbols. Open to Freshmen and 
Sophomores. 

267. Basic Reporting and Writing I. 3 cr. 

Fundamentals of news reporting and writing. 
Applied practice in laboratory sections, special 
events and beats covered outside of class. VDT 
used. Typing ability required. 

268. Basic Reporting and Writing II. 3 cr. 

Advanced writing of the more complex types of 
news stories, such as business, government, courts. 
Applied practice in laboratory sections. VDT used. 
Typing ability required. Prerequisite: 267. 

290. Field Study in Mass Communications. 3 cr. 

A field study is a practical experience in advertis- 
ing, broadcasting, public relations, print journal- 
ism or photography. Individual projects may be 



brochures, slides, feature articles, stringing or 
other professional experiences. (Offered both 
semesters) 

330. Public Relations Principles. 3 cr. 

Study of the principles, history and practices of 
public relations in business, education, govern- 
ment and non-profit institutions. Analysis of PR 
programs. Ethics and responsibilities. Open to 
Juniors, Seniors and non-majors. 

331. Public Relations Practices. 3 cr. 

Case studies of public relations programs in indus- 
try, education, social welfare and trade associa- 
tions. The application of techniques through the 
design and implementation of programs for cli- 
ents. Open to Junior and Senior majors. Pre- 
requisites: 267, 268 and 330, or approval of 
Department. 

367. Radio-Television: Principles 

and Writing. 3 cr. 

A lecture-laboratory course in the study and appli- 
cation of news writing principles and practices for 
radio and television. Laboratory experience in 
radio and closed-circuit TV studios. Open to non- 
majors. Prerequisites: 267, 268, or approval of 
Department. 

369. Advertising: Principles and Writing. 3 cr. 

A lecture-laboratory course in the study and appli- 
cation of writing principles and practices for 



35 



adverlising. Study of various types of advertising. 
Open to non-majors. Prerequisites: 267, 268, or 
approval of Department. 

370. The Broadcast Program. 3 cr. 

A study of the programming strategies in commer- 
cial and public broadcasting. Factors impacting 
programming decisions, the organizing and design 
of program services in a variety of work-settings, 
and the importance of scheduling in the opera- 
tional design. Neither artistic nor creative func- 
tions are covered, but rather pragmatic matters 
affecting programming executives. 

371. Mass Communications and 

Public Opinion. 3 cr. 

A study of the nature of public opinion and the 
mass communications process, effects of propa- 
ganda, and barriers to effective communication. 
Open to Juniors, Seniors and non-majors. 

372. Communications Law. 3 cr. 

A study of the legal rights, responsibilities and eth- 
ics of the mass media. Libel and broadcast regula- 
tions. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

375. Editing. 3 cr. 

A lecture-laboratory course in editing and present- 
ing the written word for the mass media. Style, 
headlines, typography covered. VDT used. Prereq- 
uisite: 267 or approval of Department. 

376. History of the Mass Media. 3 cr. 

Concentrated lecture-discussion course in an his- 
torical context of major social influences affecting 
American journalism from the colonial press 
period to contemporary society. Open to Juniors 
and Seniors. 

378. Photography for Journalism. 3 cr. 

A lecture-laboratory course in the preparation and 
use of photography for publication. Fundamentals 
of camera work, developing, printing, print evalu- 
ation and editorial uses of photography empha- 
sized. Student must provide an approved camera. 
Open to non-majors. 

379. Graphic Communications. 3 cr. 

A laboratory-demonstration course to introduce 
students to all elements of the graphic design pro- 
cess related to preparing publications for print. 
Using a grid, transfer type and borders, greeking, 
paper, color overlays, line and clip art, preparing a 
key and photos. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Pre- 
requisites: 267, 268, 375 or approval of Depart- 
ment. (This course recommended prior to 380.) 

380. Specialized Publications. 3 cr. 

A study of association, business, industrial, profes- 
sional and non-profit communications. Writing, 
designing and editing brochures, newsletters, 
annual reports, magazines and other internal and 
external publications. Prerequisites: 167, 267, 268, 
375. 



381. Visual Productions I. 3 cr. 

Basic instruction in the planning, script writing 
and use of photography for audiovisual produc- 
tions, primarily slide programs. Emphasis on the 
production of title and caption slides, text slides 
and the integration of these elements into slide 
presentations. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: 
378 or approval of Department. 

391. Research: Advertising & 

Public Relations. 3 cr. 

In the world of communications, research has 
become an increasingly important tool. More and 
more communicatons professionals are using the 
results of research in their everyday work. The 
course content will show the student how research 
can be applied to specific problems in Advertising 
and Public Relations. The student will learn to 
understand the techniques of research and how to 
use research results. (Offered both semesters) 

405. Advanced Public Affairs Reporting. 3 cr. 

A lecture-laboratory course in gathering and inter- 
pretive news writing on urban affairs. Analysis of 
major political, economic, and social develop- 
ments that have local news interest and signifi- 
cance. Guests and field trips. Prerequisites: 267, 
268. 

409. Advanced Writing for Advertising. 3 cr. 

A lecture-laboratory course in copywriting and 
design for advertising. Major campaign compiled. 
Prerequisite: 369. 

411. Magazine Article Writing. 3 cr. 

A lecture-laboratory course in free-lance article 
writing for the general and specialized magazine. 
Queries, research and marketing. Open to Juniors, 
Seniors and non-majors with Department 
approval. Prerequisite: 267. 

413. Advanced Writing for Radio 

and Television. 3 cr. 

A lecture-laboratory course in writing for radio 
and television. Scripting special types of programs, 
such as documentaries, editorials, panel shows, 
PSA's, traffic continuity, promotion-publicity. Pre- 
requisite: 367. 

420. International Communications. 3 cr. 

A study of world news systems and an analysis of 
their roles as instruments of world understanding. 
Comparison of U.S. -foreign systems, including 
newspapers, broadcasting, magazines and wire ser- 
vices. Open to Juniors, Seniors and non-majors. 

440. Writing Reviews/Criticism. 3 cr. 

Analysis, discussion and writing of reviews/criti- 
cism of books, theater, films, television, music and 
the visual arts. Lab sessions stress the writing of 
reviews and accompanying interviews, as well as 
critiques of published reviews. Guest speakers 
include local critics and artists. Prerequisites: 267, 
268 or approval of Department. 

441. Secondary School Communications. 3 cr. 

Function of publications and broadcasting in the 
secondary school. Role and responsibilities of 



36 



school press advisors. Teaching of journalilsm on 
the high school level. Course is directed at stu- 
dents seeking a Pennsylvania teacher's certificate 
in communication with emphasis in high school 
journalism. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Prereq- 
uisites: 167, 267. 

466. Professional Internship: 

Advertising. 3 cr. 

A supervised observation-experience program of 
study and assignment to an assigned advertising 
agency or industrial advertising department in 
conjunction with the Business/Professional 
Advertising Association, Pittsburgh Chapter. Pre- 
requisites: 167, 267, 268, 367, 369, 372 or 376, 
409. (Offered both semesters.) 

468. Professional Internship: 

Broadcasting. 3 cr. 

A supervised observation-experience program of 
study and assignment to a commercial/educa- 
tional broadcasting station in the Pittsburgh area. 
Prerequisites: 167, 267, 268, 367, 369, 370, 372 or 
376, 413. (Offered both semesters.) 

470. Professional Internship: 

Newspapers. 3 cr. 

A supervised observation-experience program of- 
study and assignment to a local newspaper includ- 
ing members of the Pennsylvania Newspaper Pub- 
lishers Association. Prerequisites: 167, 267, 268, 



367, 369, 375, 372 or 376, 405. (Offered both 
semesters.) 

476. Professional Internship: 

Public Relations. 3 cr. 

A supervised observation-experience program of 
study and assignment to a public relations agency, 
association, industrial, non-profit or educational 
group in the Pittsburgh area. Prerequisites: 167, 
267, 268, 330, 331, 367, 369, 375, 372 or 376, 380. 
(Offered both semesters.) 

485. Industrial Advertising. 3 cr. 

Deals with the principles and practices of indus- 
trial marketing communications. Emphasis will be 
placed on trade-paper ads, direct-mail advertising, 
descriptive product folders, sales letters and 
presentations. Examination will be made of 
related crafts such as commercial art, typography, 
printing, plate-making and media selection. Pre- 
requisites: 167, 267, 268, 367, 369. 

490. Individual Projects in Mass 
Communications. 3 cr. 

Individual research projects in the mass media. 
Related to a media topic not covered in other 
courses. Written paper or other appropriate for- 
mats. Open to Junior and Senior majors only. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor and department 
chairman. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Chairman: Charles A. Loch, M.A. 

The Department of Mathematics offers a sequence of modern courses which will 1) aid students in develop- 
ing their ability to think scientifically and form independent judgments; 2) provide students with a breadth 
and depth of knowledge concerning not only manipulative skills but also fundamental and essential theory; 
3) enable students to use their knowledge in the formulation and solution of problems; and 4) give students 
the necessary basis of foundation for the pursuit of graduate study or productive effort at the bachelor level. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

Bachelor of Arts Degree. A minimum of 32 semester hours is required. These must include 115, 1 16, 215, 
216, 303, 415, 416; the remainder must be selected from courses numbered above 300. Exceptionally able 
seniors are encouraged to seek departmental approval to include 500 level mathematics courses listed in the 
graduate catalog. Extradepartmental Requirements: Computer Science 101 Basic or 1 1 1 Fortran or 112 
Pascal. 

Bachelor of Science Degree. A minimum of 32 semester hours is required. These must include 115, 116, 
215, 216. 303, 415, 416; the remainder must be selected from courses numbered above 300. 

Extradepartmental Requirements: 20 hours in science, 211,212 General Analytical Physics and Computer 
Science 101 Basic 1 1 1 Fortran or 1 12 Pascal must be taken. The remaining courses may be selected from 
Biology 111, 112 and 226 and above. Chemistry 121 and above. Physics above 212, and additional 
Computer Science courses. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

A minor must include 1 15 and 14 additional credits selected from courses numbered above 115; 116 must 
be included. 

For science majors, 215, 216, 315, 321 are recommended. 

For economics and social science major, 308, 225 or 301, 306 are recommended. 



101. Elementary Mathematics. 3 cr. 

A remedial course in the fundamentals of algebra, 
including the solution of equations and inequali- 
ties. Not to be counted toward a major, minor or 
the mathematics/science area requirements. 



103, 104. Finite Mathematics, I, II. 3 cr. each 

A course meeting the needs of non-science stu- 
dents in the College for an introduction to matri- 
ces and their applications, linear programming. 



37 



probability and statistics, computer and other rele- 
vant topics. Not counted toward a major or 
minor. 

105. College Algebra and Trigonometry. 4 cr. 

A modern course in college algebra and analytic 
trigonometry for those students who do not pos- 
sess the prerequisties for 1 15. Not counted toward 
a major or minor. 

107, 108. Introduction to Modern 

Mathematics I, II. 3 cr. each 

This course is designed for elementary education 
students in the School of Education. Not to be 
counted toward a major, minor, or the mathemat- 
ics/science area requirement. 

109. College Algebra. 3 cr. 

A traditional course in college algebra for students 
who are not prepared for 111. Not counted toward 
a major or minor. Credit will not be allowed for 
both this course and 105. 

111. Calculus for Non-Science Students. 3 cr. 

Differentiation and integration of algebraic, loga- 
rithmic, and exponential functions, maxima and 
minima, area, exponential growth. Not counted 
toward a major. Credit will not be allowed for 
both this course and 1 15. 

115, 116, 215. Calculus, I, II, III. 4 cr. each 

A unified course in analytic geometry and 
calculus. Considers theory of limits, functions 
differentiation, integration, series, geometry of 
space, functions of several variables, and multiple 
integration. Prerequisites for 115; Two years of 
algebra, one year of plane geometry, and one-half 
year of trigonometry. 

216. Ordinary Differential Equations. 3 cr. 

The course includes solutions, existence of solu- 
tions, and applications of differential equations. 
Prerequisite; 215. 

221. History of Mathematics. 3 cr. 

This is a survey of the historical development of 
mathematics. Prerequisite: One Year of College 
Mathematics, preferably including one semester of 
calculus. Not counted toward a major. 

225. Fundamentals of Statistics. 3 cr. 

A basic course in probability theory and descrip- 
tive and inferential statistics for non-majors. Pre- 
requisite: High school algebra. Not counted 
toward a major. 

301, 302. Introduction to Probability 

and Statistics I, II. 3 cr. each 

A mathematical treatment of probability theory 
and mathematical statistics including probability 
distributions, random variables and their transfor- 
mations, expectation, point and interval estima- 
tion, sampling distributions. Prerequisite: 116 or 
equivalent. 

303. Principles of Modern Algebra. 3 cr. 

A study of basic properties of groups, rings, 
boolean algebra, and fields. Prerequisities: 115, 
116. 



306, 307. Linear Algebra I, II. 3 cr. each 

A study of linear transformations and matrics, and 
models, 307 is identical to Computer Science 307 
in which knowledge of a computer language 
(BASIC, FORTRAN, Pascal) is required. 307 may 
be used to satisfy a mathematics or a Computer 
Science requirement but not both. Prerequisite: 
1 16 or consent of the department. 

308. Numerical Methods of 

Classical Analysis. 3 cr. 

A computer oriented course in numerical analysis 
introducing elementary techniques for numerical 
solution of problems. A knowledge of Fortran or 
equivalent language is assumed. This course is 
identical to Computer Science 308. It may be used 
to satisfy a Math requirement or a Computer Sci- 
ence requirement but not both. Prerequisite: 215, 
Fortran 111. 

311. Introduction to Number Theory. 3 cr. 

A discussion of divisibility, congruences, quad- 
ratic residues, diophantine equations and arith- 
metical functions. Prerequisite: Proficiency at 105 
level. 

315. Advanced Differential Equations. 3 cr. 

Principally theoretical, this course considers the 
methods of solutions as well as existence and 
uniqueness of solutions, applications, and partial 
differential equations. Prerequisite: 216. 

321. Mathematical Concepts for Physics. 3 cr. 

A survey of the mathematical concepts used in 
undergraduate physics, especially quantum 
mechanics. Topics covered include vector analy- 
sis, matrix theory, complex function theory. 
Fourier series and calculus of variations. Prerequi- 
site: 216. 

325. Applications in Statistics 3 cr. 

This course is intended for students interested in 
statistics and who wish to examine methods in 
applying statistics. Topics include: Aspects of lin- 
ear modeling in regression analysis, experimental 
design and analysis of categorical data. Emphasis 
is placed on applications. Prerequisite: one semes- 
ter of calculus and one semester of statistics. 

401. Fundamentals of Geometry. 3 cr. 

The course considers topics in Euclidean and 
Non-Euclidean geometry; also synthetic, projec- 
tive, and affine geometries, and some topology. 
Prerequisite: 215. Not offered in regular sequence, 
but available on request. 

403. Introduction to Point Set Topology. 3 cr. 

A survey of elementary topics including topologi- 
cal spaces, compactness, connectedness, conver- 
gence and separation axioms. Prerequisite: 215. 
Not offered in regular sequence, but available on 
request. 

405. Introduction to Complex Variables. 3 cr. 

Topics include the plane of complex numbers, 
functions of a complex variable and integration in 
the complex plane. Prerequisite: 216. not offered 
in regular sequence, but available on request. 



38 



415, 416. Advanced Calculus I, II. 3 cr. each 

A rigorous study of the calculus and its founda- 
tion. Prerequisite: 216. 

431. Introduction to Biostatistics. 3 cr. 

Intended primarily for upper level pharmacy and 
biology students; acquaints the student with some 
of the common statistical techniques applied to 



research and data analysis in the life sciences. Not 
counted toward a major. 



491 to 499. Selected Topics 

in Mathematics. 1-3 cr. each 

This is an honors course. Topics selected in con- 
sultation with staff. 



MEDIA ARTS 

It is the goal of the Media Arts program to develop professional attitudes and competencies in media 
technologies. Required studies in the humanities and science, combined with major courses, provide the 
background necessary for success in a field which daily influences the opinions, attitudes and decisions that 
affect every aspect of contemporary human experience. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

A major consists of thirty-six credits in Media Arts courses. 101. Introduction to Media Arts; 103. Video 
Production I (Eng.); and 1 12. Photography I, are required for all majors. Medical Media Majors must take 
407. Photography-Medical Photography. 

Media Arts majors may concentrate on either program development or production. In close consultation 
with their academic advisors, they may design programs which emphasize photography, videography, 
writing, or a combination of these areas. A subspecialty in Medical Media Communications is also avail- 
able. (Prospective Medical Media Majors will be interviewed by the program director before being admitted 
to the major.) 

Two extra-departmental courses may be applied toward the Media Arts Major: Fine Arts 220 (History of 
Photography) and Journalism 381 (Visual Production I). 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

Eighteen credits are required for a minor in Media Arts. These must include 101. Introduction to Media 
Arts. 

Media Arts Minors may, in consultation with their advisors, design general programs to gain broad 
experience or concentrate in either of the following areas: Video Production (103, 108, 208, 308 403); 
Photography ( 1 12, 212. 312, 401 and Fine Arts 220). 



Basic Courses 

101. Introduction to Media Arts. 3 cr. 

Survey course to familiarize students with equip- 
ment operations, technology, and theory of com- 
munications as well as the selection, use and eval- 
uation of media. 

106. Creative Media. 3 cr. 

Implications of the theories of visual thinking and 
psychology of media. Application of these theories 
in the development of media resources. Motiva- 
tion, attention, organization, cueing, reinforce- 
ment and response are studied. 

206. Graphics for Media Production. 3 cr. 

Basic experience in planning and producing 
graphic material for television, display, classroom, 
and lectures. 

215. Production Design and Scripting. 3 cr. 

Study of the instructional design of media 
resources. The decision making process: purpose, 
content, method, audience, medium. Research 
techniques, script development and story-board- 
ing. 

217. Aesthetics of Media Production. 3 cr. 

Investigation into the aesthetics of audio-visual 
communication. Technology vs creativity; per- 
sonal expression vs public need. 



Video Production 

103. Video Production I (ENG). 3 cr. 

Introductory course to video production. Use of 
the single camera for Electronic News Gathering 
or information documentation. Electronic editing 
of information into a coherent message. 

108. Video Production II (EFP). 3 cr. 

Introduction to Electronic Field Production (Loca- 
tion shooting). Use of script or story line to pro- 
duce a program, shot in segments and edited into 
final form. Extensive out-of-class production time. 
Prerequisite: 103. 

208. Video Production III (STUDIO). 3 cr. 

Exploration into the key elements of good studio 
production. Emphasis on lighting, program design 
and development, and set. Live and recorded pro- 
ductions with supporting audio-visuals. Prerequi- 
site: 108. 

308. Video Production IV (ADVANCED). 3 cr. 

Total video production. Combination of single 
camera and studio work. Extensive editing. Pre- 
requisites: 208, 206, and 215. 

403. Video Production V (PRACTICUM). 3 cr. 

Experience in the field working with approved 
organization; producting a program to be used for 
that organization's communciations needs. Senior 
only. Prerequisites: 308, 202. 



39 



Photography 

112. Photography I (INTRODUCTION). 3 cr. 

Lecture-laboratory course in the use of photogra- 
phy as a communications medium. Fundamentals 
of camera work, film developing, printing, light 
and filters. 

212. Photography II (INTERMEDIATE). 3 er. 

Introduction to color, use of light variations, and 
color slide format. Extensive camera work. Prereq- 
uisite: 1 12. 

312. Photography III (ZONE). 3 cr. 

Extensive work in black and white photography. 
Zone system is explored. Prerequisite: 212. 

401. Photography IV (ADVANCED). 3 cr. 

Development of a communications tool using 
photography as a medium. Emphasis on con- 
tinuity of the visual image to deliver the message. 
Prerequisites: 212, 206. 

407. Photography V (MEDICAL 
PHOTOGRAPHY). 3 cr. 

Clinical approach to the documentation of 
patients, specimens, and surgical procedures. 
Emphasis on lighting and positioning of subject. 
Institutional decorum, safety, death and dying are 
discussed. Prerequisite: 401. 

Audio Production 

202. Audio Production I (BASIC). 3 cr. 

Investigation into the types of recording equip- 
ment, microphones, and sound systems needed for 
production. Experience in recording, mixing 
sound and editing. 

302. Audio Production II (ADVANCED). 3 cr. 

Extended experience in Audio Production. Prereq- 
uisite: 202. 



Advanced Courses 

311. Multi Media Production/ 3 cr. 

Development of a multi media production incor- 
porating the various media; print, photography, 
video, graphics, audio, into a single communica- 
tions devise. Prerequisites: 112, 212, 206, 202, 
103, 108, and 215. 

402. Producer-Director. 3 cr. 

The role of the director as a catalyst in media 
production. The producer as coordinator. Exami- 
nation of directors and evaluation of their work. 

404. Management of a Media Facility. 3 cr. 

The problems of setting up, designing, and manag- 
ing an integrated program. Budget, organization 
and standardization of services explored. 

409. Interactive Video. 3 cr. 

Investigation into the applicability of Interactive 
Video in the industrial and educational environ- 
ments. Methods of meeting needs not possible 
with linear media. Prerequisites: 108 and 215. 

412. Current Issues in the Media Arts. 3 cr. 

Discussion of Professional problems in the field of 
Media Arts and Communications. This seminar is 
open to seniors only with permission of the 
instructor. 



405. Directed Readings. 



Variable credits 



408. Internship. Variable credits 

Intensive application of experiences gained during 
course work in the field situation. Prerequisite: 
Appropriate major course work and approval of 
the Program Directors. Seniors only. 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Chairman: Francesca Colecchia, Ph.D. 

The Department of Modern Languages offers courses in French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish and 
Swahili. On the elementary and intermediate level in French, German, and Spanish, the student may choose 
from two "tracks" of language courses, both of which satisfy College degree requirements. One of these 
emphasizes reading and the other reading, writing, speaking, and aural comprehension. In conversation and 
composition courses, the student's fluency in the active use of the language is strengthened. Subsequent 
courses stress primarily literary studies in which the student is systematically introduced to a survey of the 
literature and is given a working acquaintance with the culture of the groups whose language he is studying. 
Choice of courses dealing with specific works, authors, and auxilliary subjects is also presented. 

The student possessing a knowledge of foreign languages will find career opportunities in a number of 
fields such as: education, government employment, foreign service, social work, industry, and tourism. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

The Department offers major programs in French, German, and Spanish. In addition, it offers minor 
programs in these languages, Italian and Russian, as well as non-major courses in Swahili. 

The major program in Modern Languages and Literatures consists of a minimum of 24 semester hours at 
the 300 level and above. Required courses are: 

French: 301, 302, 462, 463. Majors will discuss their courses with their advisors. 

German: 301, 302, 460, 461. Majors will discuss their courses with their advisors. 

Spanish: 301, 302, 401, 402, 453, 454. Majors will discuss their courses with their advisors. 

Elementary and intermediate courses must be taken in sequence. It is recommended that students not 
take advanced courses out of progression. Credit toward the major or minor will not be given for 201, 202, 



40 



211, 212, or 239. 240 which are intermediate level courses: 302 is the recommended prerequisite to all 
courses numbered 312 and above. 

It is recommended that majors in the Department include a course in the art of the country in whose 
language they specialize as well as one course of literature in translation in the literature of a country other 
than that of their major. 

A maximum of 12 transfers credits will be accepted toward the major. 

Junior Year Abroad. Majors are strongly encouraged but not obliged to participate in programs approved 
in advance by the Department. Further information may be obtained at the Department office. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

The minor program consists of a minimum of 12 semester hours at the 300 level and above. 



490. Independent Field Study. 

(All Languages) Var. cr. 

The student will participate, under the supervision 
and guidance of the instructor, in selected tours to 
various foreign countries to undertake indepen- 
dent study on selected and approved projects 
involving the exploration and study of history, 
life, work, arts and culture. Prerequisite: Prior per- 
mission of the instructor and Department 
Chairman. 

495. Professional Language Internship. 3 cr. 

An unpaid internship consisting of 100-120 hours 
of supervised work for which the student will 
receive three credits. See Department for' 
particulars. 

French 

101, 102. Elementary French. 3 cr. each 

Fundamentals of oral and written French. Three 
hours lecture and one hour laboratory each week. 

Ill, 112. Elementary French 

for Reading. 3 cr. each 

The course will stress basic grammar and structure 
for reading comprehension. 

115, 116. French for Musicians. 3 cr. each 

Specially designed for majors in music to provide 
them with those skills in French to meet their 
professional requisites. Registration limited to stu- 
dents in the School of Music. This course does not 
allow for continuation at the 200 level or higher. 

120. Intensive French. 6 cr. 

Fundamentals of oral and written French. Utilizes 
a different approach allowing the student to com- 
plete one year's work in one semester. Six lecture 
hours and one-hour laboratory each week. 

201, 202. Intermediate French. 3 cr. each 

An intensified review and continuation of 101, 

102. Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent. 



211, 212. Intermediate French 
for Reading. 

Prerequisite: 102 or 112. 



3 cr. each 



220. Intensive French. 6 cr. 

Review and continuation of'120. Utilizes tech- 
niques allowing the student to complete one-year's 
work in one semester. Prerequisite: 120, 102 or 
equivalent. 



239, 240. Readings in Modern 

French Authors. 3 cr. each 

Selections from modern works of literature. Do 
not carry credit toward a major or minor. Prereq- 
uisite: 202 or equivalent. 

301, 302. French Conversation and 
Composition. 3 cr. each 

302 or its equivalent is the recommended prereq- 
uisite to all courses above 302. Prerequisite: 202 or 
equivalent. 

320-345. Pro-Seminar in French 

Literature and Culture. 3 cr. each 

All courses numbered 320 through 345 are pro- 
seminars in literature and culture. The following 
courses represent current pro-seminar offerings. 
They will be offered on a rotated basis and/or as 
circumstances warrant from semester to semester. 
All pro-seminars carry three credits a semester. 
Recommended prerequisite: French 302 or its 
equivalent. 

320. Stylistics. 3 cr. 

Comparative study of English/French style in 
spoken and written French. 

321. Phonetics. 3 cr. 

Mechanics of phonation with comparative 
English-French application to phonemic analysis 
of French. 

322. Theatre de L'Avant-Garde. 3 cr. 

The "avant-garde" theatre since 1950: Ionesco, 
Beckett, Genet, Schehade, Vian, Pinget. 

323. Maupassant. 3 cr. 

Consideration of one of the most popular writers 
in France in the 1880's. Selected short stories and 
novels. 

324. Balzac. 3 cr. 

Study of Honore de Balzac (1799-1850), author of 
the vast Comedie humaine. Selected novels. 

325. Realism and Naturalism. 3 cr. 

Theories of the two movements in the latter part 
of the 19th Century. Their manifestations in prose 
works from Balzac to Zola. 

326. The Literature of the Existentialist 
Movement. 3 cr. 

Analysis and discussion of selected works of A. 
Camus, J. P. Sartre, and G. Marcel. 



327. The Symbolist Movement in 
French Poetry. 3 cr. 

A basic introduction to the Symbolist movement, 
with emphasis on hermetic poetry of Mallarme 
and Rimbaud. 

328. French Poetry: Middle Ages to 19th 
Century. 3 cr. 

Study of mechanics of prosody, various genres, 
periods, movements in French poetry. 

329. 17th Century French Literature. 3 cr. 

Emphasis on 17th Century French prose and 
poetry. Will also include a play of Corneille, 
Racine, and Moliere. 

330. French Prose of the 19th Century. 3 cr. 

Consideration of the French prose of the first half 
of the century: Chateaubriand. Balzac, Stendhal. 

331. 18th Century French Literature. 3 cr. 

An overview of the Siec/e cics lumieres, with 
emphasis on the four major philosophers: Montes- 
quieu. Voltaire. Diderot, and Rousseau. 

332. Voltaire and His Age. 3 cr. 

In-depth work on Voltaire, plus one other writer of 
the period, such as Prevost, Beaumarchais, 
Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, etc. 

360. French for Business. 3 cr. 

Spoken and written language of business French. 
Conventions of letter writing, import, export, and 
commercial transactions. 

460-475. Seminar in French 

Literature. 3 cr. each 

All courses numbered 460 through 475 are semi- 
nars in literature, designed to offer the advanced 
undergraduate student the opportunity to study 
various aspects of literature in greater depth. The 
following courses represent current seminar offer- 
ings: they will be offered on a rotated basis and/or 
as circumstances warrant from semester to semes- 
ter. All seminars carry three credits a semester. 
French 462 and 463 are recommended prerequi- 
sites for these courses. 



460. History and Culture of France 
since the Revolution. 

From the Revolution to today. 



3cr. 



462. Chanson de Roland through 

17th Century. 3 cr. 

Literary Survey I. Main authors and movements 
of the Middle Ages, 16th, and 17th Centuries. 

463. 18th Century to Modern Period. 3 cr. 

Literary Survey II. Main authors and movements 
of the 18th. 19th, and 20th Centuries. 

French 462 and 463 are recommended prerequi- 
sites for these courses. 

464. 17th Century French Theatre. 3 cr. 

An overview of the threatre of le grand siecle. 
Emphasis on Corneille. Moliere, and Racine. 



41 



465. 18th Century French Theatre. 3 cr. 

An overview of the major dramatists of the 
century, including Marivaux, Voltaire, and 
Beaumarchais. 

466. 19th Century French Poetry. 3 cr. 

The major poetic movements of the 19th Century: 
Romanticism, Parnassianism, Symbolism, with a 
special emphasis on Baudelaire. 



467. 19th Century French Novel. 

Selected novels from the 19th 
Romanticism to Naturalism. 



3cr. 

Century, from 



468. 19th Century French Theatre. 3 cr. 

Beginning with the influence of the Revolution on 
French literature, through the literary movements 
of the century. Emphasizes works written for the 
stage and currents in criticism and directing. 

469. 20th Century French Poetry. 3 cr. 

Ambivalence of modern French poetry after 
Baudelaire. Will consider Apollinaire, Valery, 
Breton, Aragon, Eluard, Cocteau, Supervielle, 
Saint-Jean Perse. 

470. 20th Century French Novel. 3 cr. 

From A. France to Robbe-Grillet and the "New 
Novel." 

471. 20th Century French Theatre. 3 cr. 

From Jules Romains to Ionesco and the Theatre 
of the Absurd. 

472. Sartre and Camus. 3 cr. 

Contrastive study of Sartre and Camus and their 
works. 

480. Directed Readings. Var. cr. 

Readings of literary texts under close faculty 
supervision, for majors only and only with per- 
mission of the Department. Variable credit. 

German 

101, 102. Elementary German. 3 cr. each 

Fundamentals of oral and written German. Three 
hours lecture and one hour laboratory each week. 

Ill, 112. Elementary German for 

Reading. 3 cr. each 

The course will stress basic grammar and structure 
for reading comprehension. 

115, 116. German for Musicians. 3 cr. each 

Specially designed for majors in music to provide 
them with those skills in German to meet their 
professional requisites. Registration limited to stu- 
dents in the School of Music. This course does not 
allow for continuation at the 200 level or higher. 

201, 202. Intermediate German. 3 cr. each 

An intensified review and continuation of 101, 

102. Prerequisite: 102 of equivalent. 



211, 212. Intermediate German 
for Reading. 

Prerequisite: 102 or 112. 



3 cr. each 



42 



239, 240. Readings in Modern 

German Authors. 3 cr. each 

Selections from modern works of literature. Do 
not carry credit toward a major or minor. Prereq- 
uisite: 202 or equivalent. 



252. Readings in Scientific German. 

Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent. 



3cr. 



301, 302. German Composition and 
Conversation. 3 cr. each 

302 or its equivalent is the recommended prereq- 
uisite to all courses above 302. Prerequisite: 202 or 
equivalent. 

320-345. Pro-Seminar in German 

Literature and Culture. 3 cr. each 

All courses numbered 320 through 345 are pro- 
seminars in literature and culture. The following 
courses represent current pro-seminar offerings. 
They will be offered on a rotated basis and/or as 
circumstances warrant from semester to semester. 
All pro-seminars carry three credits a semester. 
Recommended Prerequisite: German 302 or 
equivalent. 

320. History of German Culture 

from the Franks to Hitler. 3 cr. 

The artistic, socio-historical, and literary expres- 
sions of German culture from the earliest periods 
to World War II. 

321. History of German Culture 

from Hitler to the Present. 3 cr. 

The artistic, socio-political, and literary manifesta- 
tions of German culture from Hitler to the 
Present. 

324. Popular Tradition 

in German Literature. 3 cr. 

Emphasis on poetic verse, fairy tales, folk tales, 
legends, heroic tales, jocular tales. 

325. Popular Tradition 

in German Literature. 3 cr. 

Study of popular literature such as sagas, animal 
fables, chap books, as well as selected, more com- 
plex fairy tales and legends. 

326. Women Figures in German 
Literature from Goethe to Boll. 

Key women figures in German Literature from 
Gretchcn in Faust to strong characters in Boll's 
novels and short stories. 

329. Introduction to German Poetry. 3 cr. 

German verse from early modern times to con- 
temporary. Narrative, dramatic, and epic verse. 
Emphasis on brief lyric verse. 

330. Modern German Prose. 3 cr. 

Individual's search for identity in the prose works 
of Thomas Mann, F. Kafka, H. Hesse, and H. 
Boll. 

331. Modern German Theatre. 3 cr. 

From the introduction of naturalism into German 
drama in the late 19th Centurv to the most recent 



movements since World War II. Will discuss 
Hauptmann, Brecht, Zuckmayer, Durrenmatt and 
Frisch. 

460, 475. Seminar in German 

Literature. 3 cr. each 

All courses numbered 460 through 475 are semi- 
nars in literature, designed to offer the advanced 
undergraduate student the opportunity to study 
various aspects of literature in greater depth. 

The following courses represent current seminar 
offerings: they will be offered on a rotated basis 
and/or as circumstances warrant from semester to 
semester. All seminars carry three credits a semes- 
ter. Recommended prerequisite: German 302. 

460. German Literature to Lessing. 3 cr. 

German literature from the Middle Ages up to and 
including the early 18th Century. 

461. Lessing: His Life and Works. 3 cr. 

Lessing's major literary and critical works consid- 
ered in relation to his life. 

462. Advanced German Stylistics. 3 cr. 

Comparative study of German/English style in 
spoken and written German. 

464. German Romantic Literature. 3 cr. 

The German Romantic movement following the^ 
Napoleon era. The role of the individual in the- 
works of Novalis, Tieck, etc. 

465. Modern German Narrative. 3 cr. 

The process of alienation in modern German nar- 
rative. Includes novels by H. Hesse and T. Mann. 

467. Age of Goethe. 3 cr. 

Study of important works of Goethe and his near 
contemporaries. Emphasis on Lessing, Goethe. 
Schiller. Also "Sturm und Drang" authors. 

468. Goethe's Faust. 3 cr. 

Emphasis on the spirit of the 18th Century as per- 
sonified in Goethe's Faust. 

470. Literature of Enlightenment. 3 cr. 

Consideration of late "baroque" and early "classi- 
cists", including Gellert, Gottsched, Hamann, 
Lichtenberg, Klopstock, Seume, Giinther, 
Wieland. 

471. Sturm und Drang. 3 cr. 

Storm and Stress as Germany's literary revolution 
against the despotic tyrants of the 18th Century. 
Includes Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther 
and Schiller's The Robbers. 

480. Directed Readings. Var. cr.i 

Reading of literary texts under close faculty super- 
vision; for majors only and only with permission 
of the Department. Variable credit. 

Italian 

101, 102. Elementary Italian. 3 cr. each 

Fundamentals of oral and written Italian. Three 
lecture hours and one hour laboratory each week. 



43 



115, 116. Italian for Musicians. 3 cr. each 

Specially designed for majors in music to provide 
them with those skills in Italian to meet their pro- 
fessional requisites. Registration limited to stu- 
dents in the School of Music. This course does not 
allow for continuation at the 200 level or higher. 

201, 202. Intermediate Italian. 3 cr. each 

All intensified review and continuation of 101, 
102. Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent. 



each 



301, 302. Italian Conversation and 
Composition. 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. 

314, 315. Individual Study. Var. Cr. 

Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. 

320-345. Pro-Seminar in Italian 

Literature and Culture. 3 cr. each 

All courses numbered 320 through 345 are pro- 
seminars in literature and culture. The following 
courses represent current pro-seminar offerings. 
They will be offered on a rotated basis and/or as 
circumstances warrant from semester to semester. 
All pro-seminars carry three credits a semester. 

321. Modern Italian Novel 

(Levi, Buzzati, Cassola, Moravia). 3 cr. 

A study of the works of significant representatives 
of neorealism, analyzed within the framework of 
the social and political atmosphere of pre- and 
post-World War II Italy. 

322. Commercial Italian. 3 cr. 

A review of the basic grammatical structures of 
Italian composition and commercial correspon- 
dence, with stress on the vocabulary and the phra- 
seology required in business letter writing and 
other commercial transactions. 

323. Pirandello, Svevo, Pavese. 3 cr. 

Analysis and stylistic comparison of these three 
writers representative of the literary evolvement 
after verismo to the psychological novel and 
drama, and to neorealism. 

324. Introduction to Italian Poetry. 3 cr. 

A study of the works of the most important mod- 
ern Italian poets, from Carducci to D'Annunzio. 

325. Introduction to Italian Poetry. 3 cr. 

A "continuation of 324. Study of Contemporary 
poets, with special emphasis on the works of two 
Nobel laureates, Quasimodo and Montale. 

326. History of Italian Civilization. 3 cr. 

The evolution of Italian Civilization with empha- 
sis on Humanism and the Renaissance. 

Russian 

101, 102. Elementary Russian. 3 cr. each 

Fundamentals of oral and written Russian. Three 
hours lecture, one hour laboratory each week. 

201, 202. Intermediate Russian. 3 cr. each 

An intensified review and continuation of 101, 

102. Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent. 



301-302. Russian Conversation and 
Composition. 3 cr. each 

Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. 

314, 315. Individual Study. Var. Cr. 

Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. 

320-345. Pro-Seminar in Russian 

Literature and Culture. 3 cr. each 

All courses numbered 320 through 345 are pro- 
seminars in literature and culture. The following 
courses represent current pro-seminar offerings. 
They will be offered on a rotated basis and/or as 
circumstances warrant from semester to semester. 
All pro-seminars carry three credits a semester. 

320. A. P. Chekhov. 3 cr. 

Chekhov's stories studied against the social, politi- 
cal and philosophic background of his time. 
Course conducted essentially in Russian. 

321. 19th Century Russian Short Story. 3 cr. 

The development of the short story from Pushkin 
to Chekhov. The aim of this course is to develop 
critical analysis of selected works, focusing on 
their philosophical content and political environ- 
ment. Course conducted essentially in Russian. 

322. Commercial Russian. 3 cr. 

Spoken and written language of business Russian, 
conventions of letter writing, import, export, and 
commercial transactions. 

323. Russian Folklore. 3 cr. 

Russian folklore as oral tradition. Particular atten- 
tion to traditions, festivals, rituals, epics, ballads 
and fairy tales. Course conducted in Russian. 

324. Contemporary Russian Literature. 3 cr. 

Study of short stories of Soviet writers. Represent- 
ing idealogical positions and evolutional trends 
from the revolution to Solzenitsyn. Course con- 
ducted essentially in Russian. 

Spanish 

101, 102. Elementary Spanish. 3 cr. each 

Fundamentals of oral and written Spanish. Three 
hours lecture, one hour laboratory each week. 

Ill, 112. Elementary Spanish for 

Reading. 3 cr. each 

The course will stress basic grammer and structure 
for reading comprehension. 

120. Intensive Spanish. 6 cr. 

Fundamentals of oral and written Spanish. 
Utilizes a different approach allowing the student 
to complete one year's work in one semester. Six 
lecture hours and one-hour laboratory each week. 

131, 132. Elementary Spanish 

for Industry. 3 cr. each 

Fundamentals of oral and written Spanish, with 
emphasis on basic business vocabulary and forms. 
Three hours lecture per week, (Restricted to eve- 
ning students). 



44 



201, 202. Intermediate Spanish. 3 cr. each 

An intensified continuation of 101 and 102. Pre- 
requisite: 102 or equivalent. 



211, 212. Intermediate Spanish 
for Reading. 

Prerequisite: 102 or 1 12. 



3 cr. each 



220. Intensive Spanish. 6 cr. 

Review and continuation of 120. Utilizes tech- 
niques allowing the student to complete one-year's 
work in one semester. Prerequisite: 120, 102 or 
equivalent. 

231, 232. Intermediate Spanish 

for Industry. 3 cr. each 

An intensified continuation of 131. 132. Three 
hours lecture per week. (Restricted to evening stu- 
dents). Prerequisite: 132 or equivalent. 

239. Readings in Modern Spanish 

Authors. 3 cr. 

Selection from modern works of literature. Does 
not carry credit toward major or minor. Prerequi- 
site: 202 or equivalent. 

240. Readings in Modern 
Spanish-American Authors. 3 cr. 

Selection from modern works of literature. Does 
not carry credit toward major or minor. Prerequi- 
site: 202 or equivalent. 

301, 302. Spanish Conversation 

and Composition. 3 cr. each 

302 or equivalent is the recommended prerequi- 
site to all courses above 302. Prerequisite: 202 or 
equivalent. 

320-345. Pro-Seminar in Spanish 

Literature and Culture. 3 cr. each 

All courses numbered 320 through 345 are pro- 
seminars in literature and culture. The following 
courses represent current pro-seminar offerings. 
They will be offered on a rotated basis and/or as 
circumstances warrant from semester to semester. 
All pro-seminars carry three credits a semester. 
The recommended prerequisite: Spanish 302 or 
equivalent. 

322. The Nineteenth Century Novel. 

(New Title) 3 cr. 

Examines the realist, naturalist, and regionalist 
novel in the works of Galdos, Clarin, Pardo 
Bazan. Pereda. and Valera. 

323. Don Juan as a World Literary Figure. 3 cr. 

Principal plays and narrative poems dealing with 
the theme from its origins in Seventeenth Century 
Spain through modern times. Authors include 
Tirso de Molina. Moliere, Mozart. Byron. Zorilla, 
and (i. B. Shaw. (In translation) 

324. The Generation of 98. 3 cr. 

Major works of Spain's turn of the century authors 
in their aesthetic and historical contexts. Includes: 
Unamuno. Azorin, A. Machado. Pio Baroja, J.R. 
Jimenez and Vallee Inclan. 



325. Contemporary Spanish Novel. 3 cr. 

The Spanish Novel since the Civil War. From 
Cela to the present. 

326. Contemporary Spanish- 
American Novel. 3 cr. 

Most recent developments in the novel in histori- 
cal perspective. From Asturias through Garcia 
Marquez and Sarduy. 

327. History of Spanish Culture. 3 cr. 

The literary, historical, social, political and artistic 
manifestations of Spanish culture from its origins 
to the post-Franco era. 

328. Modern Spanish Theatre. 3 cr. 

From Buero Vallejo to the present, including the 
"Underground Theatre". 

329. Revolt and Change: 

The Spanish American Novel. 3 cr. 

Nature and types of protest expressed in modern 
Spanish-American Literature. Major works of 
"protest Literature". 

330. Theatre of the Golden Age. 3 cr. 

Reading and discussion of works of the major dra- 
matists of the period: selected plays by Lope de 
Vega, Calderon and Tirso de Molina. 

360. Spanish for Business. 3 cr. 

Spoken and written language of business Spanish. 
Conventions of letter writing, import, and com- 
mercial transactions. 

401. Spanish Literature from the Cid 

through the Siglo de Oro. 3 cr. 

Survey of major works from the Medieval Period 
through the 17th Century. 

402. Spanish Literature from the 

18th Century to the Present. 3 cr. 

Survey of works representative of the major 
literary movements of the 18th, 19th, and 20th 
Century. 

453. Trends in Latin American Literature. 3 cr. 

Major movements and representative works from 
Pre-Columbian period through Romanticism. 

454. Trends in Latin American Literature. 3 cr. 

Major movements and representative works from 
Modernismo to the present. 

460-475. Seminar in Spanish 

Literature. 3 cr. each 

All courses numbered 460 through 475 are semi- 
nars in literature, designed to offer the advanced 
under graduate student the opportunity to study 
various aspects of literature in greater depth. The 
following courses represent current seminar offer- 
ings: they will be offered on a rotated basis and/or 
as circumstance warrant from semester to semes- 
ter. All seminars carry three credits a semester. 
Recommended prerequisite: Spanish 401-402 or 
equivalent. 



45 



460. The Quixote. 3 cr. 

An in-depth study of Cervantes" masterpiece and 
of the symbolic meaning of the two main 
characters. 

461. Spanish Literature since 

the Civil War. 3 cr. 

The Civil War as mirrored in this literature. Its 
relationship to contemporaneous literary expres- 
sion in other countries. From Hernandez through 
Goytisolo and Sastre. 

462. Avant-Garde 

Spanish-American Theatre. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the avant-garde theatre in 
Spanish America. Historical perspective. Influence 
of European avant-garde. 

463. Lorca and the Generation of 1927. 3 cr. 

Major poets of the "Lorca-Guillen generation" 
who brought Spanish poetrv to the new "Siglo de 
pro", 

464. The Literature of the Siglo de Oro. 3 cr. 

Spain's most glorious era through the poetry, 
prose, and drama of its major authors. 

465. Literature of Spanish Romanticism. 3 cr. 

Study of the major poems, plays and historical 
novels of the period. Authors include Duque de 



Rivas, Espronceda, Larra, Becquer, Rosalia de 
Castro and Zorilla. 

466. The Age of Enlightenment. 3 cr. 

From Fei joo to Cadalso to Larra, we see how the 
fundamental principles of the modern world have 
their seeds in this century. 

467. Readings in Medieval Literature. 3 cr. 

The development of Spanish literature from its 
oral tradition as well as the evolution of the Span- 
ish language, beginning with the "jarchas" through 
La Celestina. 

480. Directed Readings. 

Readings of literary texts under close faculty 
supervision: for majors only and only with per- 
mission of the Department. Variable credit. 

Swahili 

101, 102. Elementary Swahili. 3 cr. each 

Fundamentals of oral and written Swahili. Three 
lecture hours and one hour laboratory each week. 

201, 202. Intermediate Swahili. 3 cr. each 

An intensified continuation of 101 and 102. Pre- 
requisite: 102 or equivalent. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Chairman: Charles D. Keyes, Ph.D. 

The program offered by the Department of Philosophy is designed to be a basic part of the tudent"s liberal 
education. It is intended to introduce students to philosophical thinking, past and present, to provide a 
discipline for asking the basic questions of life and to help students begin relating their other academic 
subjects to one another and to human experience. The Department, made up of professors who have 
different philosophical interests, attempts to develop the capacity for independent thinking on all issues. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

The Department requires majors to take nine philosophy courses above the 100 level: of these nine courses, 
three must be selected from the Historical Sequence, and two from the sequence of Advanced Courses. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

Five courses arc required for a minor: one from the Introductory Courses (104 to 107), two from the Basic 
Courses (200 to 217). and two from the Historical Sequence and Advanced Courses (300 and 400 levels). 



Introductory Courses 

104. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 cr. 

A first-hand study of selected philosophical texts 
from both traditional and existential perspectives 
with the aim of introducing students to the nature 
of philosophical thinking, and to the variety of 
philosophical issues, area, methods, and theories. 

105. Ethics. 3cr. 

An introduction to ethical theories of past and 
present time. Contemporary moral issues will be 
considered in the light of these theories. 

106. Introductory Logic. 3 cr. 

Analysis of the requirements for valid reasoning, 
logical fallacies, types of definitions, and impor- 
tant informal aspects of arguments in ordinary dis- 
course will be studied in addition to the formal 
logic of inferences involving simple and com- 
pound statements. 



107. Medical Ethics. 3 cr. 

Ethical questions that arise in medical care and 
research will be examined. Topics might include: 
experimentation on animals and man, allocation 
of scarce medical resources, euthanasia, the privi- 
leged relationship of doctor and patient, etc. 

108. Business Ethics. 3 cr. 

This course, designed primarily for business 
majors, begins with a discussion of some general 
ethical issues and, in particular, the problem of a 
just distribution of wealth. These discussions are 
applied to concrete current business problems. 

Basic Courses 

200. Introduction to Phenomenology. 3 cr. 

The basic approach to philosophical issues devel- 
oped by Huserl, the founder of Phenomenology, 
will be explored; the types of signs, meaning, the 



46 



possibility of philosophy as rigorous science, etc. 
are considered. 

203. Philosophy of Religion. 3 cr. 

Introduction to the nature of religious experience. 
Topics such as: religious symbolism; belief and 
unbelief, the existence of evil, and free will, will be 
considered. Assigned readings include both tradi- 
tional and contemporary writers. 

204. Literature and Philosophy. 3 cr. 

Explores philosophical themes as they emerge 
within great works of literature. Works will be 
selected from such authors as: Sophocles, Dante, 
Shakespeare, Goethe, and Dostoyevski. 

205. Existential Phenomenology. 3 cr. 

Examination of the methods and style of thought 
which characterizes existential phenomenology. 
Lectures and discussion on texts by major think- 
ers, such as: Being and Time by Heidegger, Phe- 
nomenology of Perception by Merleau-Ponty, and 
Being and Nothingness by Sartre. 

211. Marxism. 3 cr. 

A study of the political philosophy of Karl Marx 
as one of the major directions in social thought: - 
Engels, Lenin, and contemporary Marxism. 

212. Political Philosophy. 3 cr. 

Fundamental political questions will be explored. 
For example: Utopian state, freedom, justice, the 
origins of political society, war and empire and 
revolution may be considered. Possible authors 
read: Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Macchiavelli, 
Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Hegel. 

214. Philosophy of Sex. 3 cr. 

The course provides an introduction to some of 
the basic themes and texts, both traditional and 
contemporary, related to the philosophical study 
of sex. It uses historical, analytical and phenome- 
nological methods and gives attention to the sex- 
ual origin of our consciousness of values. 

215. Psychoanalysis and Philosophy. 3 cr. 

Psychoanalysis has had an impact upon and been 
affected by modern philosophy. This course will 
study the presuppositions and implications of 
Freud's thought and that of some other thinkers, 
such as Sartre, Marcuse, Ricoeur. 

216. Communication and Philosophy. 3 cr. 

Speech is man's most important means of com- 
munication. The course will examine the struc- 
ture, purpose, and function of speech in everyday 
usage and in the spheres of politics, science, and 
art. 

217. Elementary Symbolic Logic. 3 cr. 

Introduction to the methods of symbolic logic as 
applied to the logic of arguments involving com- 
pound statements, propositional functions and 
quantifiers, and relations. 



218. Special Topics. 



1-3 cr. 



220. Philosophy of Death and Living. 3 cr. 

The course provides an introduction to some of 
the basic themes and texts, both traditional and 
contemporary, related to the philosophical study 
of death. Its main purpose is to ask how human 
beings can be happy in view of death's certainty; 
therefore it emphasizes the act of living. 

224. Philosophy of Sport. 3 cr. 

A philosophical examination of the nature of 
sport. Particular focus will be upon the ontologi- 
cal, ethical and aesthetic status of the phenome- 
non of sport. 

225. Elements of Thomistic Thought. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the basic concepts and princi- 
pal ideas of Christian philosophy with an empha- 
sis on the thought system of St. Thomas Aquinas. 
The course will cover an introduction to meta- 
physics, metaphysical thinking, definition of 
knowledge, analogy of being, the principles, struc- 
ture and causes of being, the concept of the tran- 
scendent and the problem of evil. 

255. Philosophy of Technology. 3 cr. 

A philosophical examination of how our lives are 
shaped by technology and the relation of technol- 
ogy with science, religion, ethics, and metaphysics. 

258. Computerized Formal Logic. 3 cr. 

An introduction to formal logic with computer 
assisted tutorials. The course will also deal with 
translating arguments from ordinary language into 
formal symbols and will apply these principles to 
"real world" situations. 

260. Philosophy of Law. 3 cr. 

A study of the major legal traditions. The follow- 
ing topics will be examined: legal reasoning, jus- 
tice and law, ethics and law, legal relations and 
social institutions, philosophical issues involved 
in evidence and procedure, legal and political the- 
ories, and theories of law. 

Historical Sequence 

300. Ancient Philosophy. 3 cr. 

A study of the beginning of Philosophy in Greece, 
from the Presocratics to Plotinus with readings 
principally taken from Plato and Aristotle. 

301. Medieval Philosophy. 3 cr. 

A philosophical study of medieval texts in English 
translation selected as representatives of the broad 
range of issues, approaches, and theories which 
characterize the major Christian, Jewish, and 
Islamic Philosophical thinking of the period. 

302. Early Modern Philosophy. 3 cr. 

Explores the beginning of modern thinking in the 
16th century and proceeds to the time of the 
French Revolution. Course work consists in analy- 
sis of several important texts chosen from such 
philosophers as: Montaigne, Descartes, Pascal, 
Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Hume, Kant. 

304. Later Modern Philosophy. 3 cr. 

This course examines the period of modern phi- 
losophy initiated by Kant. It deals primarily with 



the crucial thinkers of the 19th century including: 
Hegel, Feuerbach, Kierkegaard, Marx, Mill, and 
Nietzsche. 

305. Contemporary Philosophy. 3 cr. 

A study of contemporary philosophy from 1900 to 
the present, covering the methods and history of 
selected 20th century movements. 

322. American Philosophy. 3 cr. 

Puritanism, Enlightenment, Transcendentalism, 
Pragmatism, with emphasis on key figures in 
American Philosophy: Peirce, Dewey, James, 
Royce, Santayana, Whitehead, etc. 

325. Concentrated Philosophical 

Readings. 3 cr. 

This course is an in-depth study of one or several 
philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, 
Occam, Descartes, Kant, Wittgenstein, Strawson, 
Heidegger, etc., varying in subject matter from 
time to time. 

Advanced Courses 

313. Philosophy of the Human Sciences. 3 cr. 

The relations of the human sciences with other 
sciences, with philosophy, and with practical life, 
the use of the mathematics and interpretation, and 
other issues will be discussed in relation to past 
and contemporary philosophical and scientific 
thought. 

401, 402. Thomism. 3 cr. each 

Courses dealing with the texts of St. Thomas Aqui- 
nas. The first semester (401) covers his metaph- 
ysis and the second semester (402) deals with his 
philosophy of man. Neo-scholastic interpretations 
of the texts of Aquinas (Maritain, Gilson and the 
school of Marechal and Rahner). 

403. Philosophy of God. 3 cr. 

This course introduces students to selected texts 
and basic themes in types of religious experience 



47 



such as: Babylonian, Greek, and Judeo-Christian. 
It emphasizes such questions as: What is the Holy? 
What is the relation between scientific knowledge 
and religious knowledge? What are the various 
arguments about the existence of God and the 
immortality of the soul? Why is there human suf- 
fering if God is good and all-powerful? What do 
the symbols of the end of the world mean? Atten- 
tion is given both to traditional and to contempo- 
rary philosophical texts. 

406. Aesthetics. 3 cr. 

An examination of theories of art which explore 
such questions as: the beautiful, creativity, imagi- 
nation, and the role of art in life. Authors such as: 
Aristotle, Lessing, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heideg- 
ger, and Camus will be read. 

415, 416. Ancient Philosopher. 3 cr. each 

A course devoted to detailed study of a single 
ancient thinker, such as Plato or Aristotle. 

420, 421. Medieval Philosopher. 3 cr. each 

A leading Medieval thinker or thinkers, such as: 
Augustine, Avicenna, Maimonides, Bonaventure, 
will be studied. 

425, 426. Modern Philosopher. 3 cr. each 

In depth examination of the work of a single or a 
group of historically modern authors: e.g., ration- 
alism (Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz), empiricism 
(Locke, Berkeley, Hume), Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche. 

430, 431. Contemporary Philosopher. 3 cr. each 

Concentration upon a single contemporary philos- 
opher: e.g., Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau- 
Ponty, Whitehead, Wittgenstein. 



435. Senior Seminar. 



3cr. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Chairman: Walter S. Skinner, M.S. 

The program in the Department of Physics is primarily aimed at providing today's students with a funda- 
mental background in traditional Physics as well as the interrelationships with other sciences and disci- 
plines. The Department is also aware that in today's changing world, there must be a suitably flexible 
program which will best fit the graduate for the challenges faced in the many professions which are based on 
the science of Physics. There is always the hope that the student will continue professional growth in Physics 
3ut it is also realized that there are many expanding paths to professional growth. The Department program, 
herefore is structured to provide the essential background for success in graduate studies in the many 
:urrent fields which seek Physics graduates, as well as equipping the student to successfully compete for the 
ivailable positions in research institutions, government agencies or private corporations. Department policy 
alls for individual attention to student needs. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

\ minimum of 32 semester hours is required for a major. These credits must include: 21 1, 212, 301, 329, 
530, 361, 372, 402, 430, 473, 474 (483, 484, or 485 may be substituted for 474 with departmental approval). 

Extradepartmental Requirements: Chemistry 121, 122 or Biology 111, 112; Mathematics 115, 116, 215, 
'16, 308, Computer Science 111, and two years of modern language. 

If a student takes 207, 208-Physics and the Modern World and either 201, 202-General Physics or 211, 
H2-General Analytical Physics, the credits for the 207, 208 will not apply to the total number required for 
he degree. Credit will not be given for both 201, 202 and 211, 212. 



48 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PHYSICS MINOR 

The minor consists of eight hours in the General Analytical Physics (211, 212) and 12 credits of upper 
division physics on the 300 and above level. The department will structure the minor program from the 
course offerings to fit, as nearly as possible, the needs and desires of the individual student. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARTH SCIENCE MINOR 

The minor consists of a prerequisite sequence of 101 and 102, which must be taken as the first courses, and 
12 credits chosen from 203, 204, 205, 206, 303, 304, 305, as available to the curriculum. Not all courses are 
taught each semester and some are on alternate years. Earth Science 101 is prerequisite to all courses unless 
waived by the instructor. 



201, 202. General Physics. 4 cr. each 

Designed to give the student a basic knowledge 
and understanding of mechanics, properties of 
matter, heat, wave motion, sound, magnetism, 
electricity, light, and modern physics through the 
use of modern day examples and applications. At 
the completion of this course, the student should 
have attained a working knowledge of physics, its 
techniques and reasoning such that the knowledge 
of physics gained may be applied to future work in 
the sciences or other fields of endeavor. Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 103, 104 or the equivalent. Stu- 
dents who have completed Mathematics 116 and 
pre-engineering students should take 211, 212. 
Lecture, four hours; Laboratory, two hours. 

207, 208. Physics and the 

Modern World. 3 cr. each 

A course especially for the nonscientist. Designed 
to give the student some basis for understanding 
the physics of the twentieth century and the physi- 
cist's approach to the study of nature. The physics 
of everyday life is used as a basis, and classroom 
demonstrations are generously employed to help 
the student grasp concepts by showing concrete 
examples. No mathematics beyond basic high 
school algebra required. 

211, 212. General Analytical 

Physics. 4 cr. each 

This is an introduction to the fundamental theo- 
ries and applications of physics designed for stu- 
dents of sciences and engineering. Methods of 
using calculus are introduced. A good algebra 
background is necessary. The quantitative 
approach of the physcists is used in solving 
problems and understanding physical phenomena. 
Mechanics and elcctromagnetism are treated in 
minute details in 21 1 and 212 respectively. Appli- 
cations in modern physics are emphasized. Other 
topics such as heat, optics arc developed briefly. 
Co-requisite for 211: Mathematics 116. Lecture 
three hours; Laboratory two hours. 

301. Thermodynamics. 3 cr. 

This is an intermediate level course covering the 
fundamental principles of thermodynamics, 
kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. The fol- 
lowing is a partial list of items generally included: 
temperature, thermodynamic systems, work, heat, 
the first and second laws of thermodynamics, ideal 
gases, entrophy. Maxwell's equation, the kinetic 



theory of ideal gas, and the basic concept of statis- 
tical mechanics. Prerequisites: 212, Mathematics 
215. 

306. Applied Electronics Laboratory. 2-3 cr. 

This course seeks to combine a treatment of the 
principles of modern electronic instrumentation 
with practical laboratory experience. Topics which 
will be included are: passive and active electronic 
components, electronic measuring instruments, 
power supplies, amplification, feedback and con- 
trol, linear and digital devices. Emphasis will be 
on understanding instrumentation rather than on 
advanced principles of design. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

329. Advanced Laboratory I. 1 cr. 

This course is designed to acquaint the students 
with the basics of modern electronics to the extent 
that the student will have a sufficient background 
to design and use simple electronic circuits in 
future research. A set of experiments is performed 
and analyzed by the students. Subjects covered 
are: the use of research grade electronic instru- 
ments, transducers, diode and transistor circuits, 
transistor design parameters, printed circuit 
design, layout and construction. Prerequisite: 212.| 
or 202 and consent of instructor. 

330. Advanced Laboratory II. 1 cr. 

A continuation of Advanced Laboratory I which 
includes the following: basic and advanced opera- 
tional amplifier circuitry, digital integrated cir- 
cuits. Gates, Boolean Algebra, I.C. timer circuitry, 
digital flip-flops and counter circuitry, A/D & D/A 
conversion circuitry', digital meter design and con- 
struction. Prerequisite: 329 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

361. Mechanics. 4 cr,| 

An intermediate level theoretical classical 
mechanics involving concepts and problems that 
can not be understood except by using the mathe- 
matical language of vectors, calculus, matrices, etc. 
Many of the mathematical tools will be reintro- 
duced in the course. A good calculus background 
is indispensible. The topics normally covered are 
motion of a particle in 3-dimensions, non-inertia! 
systems, central force systems, dynamics of man> 
particles and rigid bodies and Lagrangian mechan 
ics. Prerequisites: 212, Mathematics 215. 



372. Electromagnetism. 4 cr 

An intermediate course for the science and engi- 
neering students. The following topics will usuall) 



49 



be discussed: electrostatics, energy relations in 
electrostatic fields, dielectrics, currents and their 
interaction, magnetic properties of matter, AC cir- 
cuits. Maxwell's equations, and electronic radia- 
tions. Prerequisites: 212; Mathematics 215. 

402. Optics. 3 cr. 

This course introduces the student to the princi- 
ples of geometrical and physical optics. Topics 
may include: reflection, refraction, diffraction, 
polarization, matrix techniques in lens system 
design, basic quantum optics and the laser. Prereq- 
uisite: 212 or 202 and the consent of the 
instructor. 

405. Acoustics. 3 cr. 

A course which presents the physical principles 
underlying the production and propagation of 
sound. Examples and explanations are focused 
principally on muscial sound. No mathematical 
preparation beyond high school algebra is 
necessary. 

419. Introduction to Micro 

and Mini Computers. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the designs of micro and mini 
computers. Exploration of assembler and special- 
ized languages for small computers. Prerequisites: 
201 Machine Language Programming and 301 
Computer Logic. 

425. Microcomputer Laboratory. 3 cr. 

A "hands-on", laboratory course in the use of sin- 
gle board microcomputers for interfacing and con- 
trol. This course introduces the student to those 
concepts of discrete and digital electronics that 
relate to the use of these concepts for interfacing 
the microcomputer with the "real", analog world. 
Some of the topics covered are: assembly language 
programming for an 8085 microprocessor, use of 
parallel and serial I/O ports, analog to digital and 
digital to analog conversion techniques, motor 
speed control, and process control. Prerequisites: 
Physics 419, or consent of the instructor. 

426. Problems in Microcomputers. 1-4 cr. 

Special topics and problems in microcomputers, 
microcomputer interfacing circuitry and related 
subjects suitable for independent work. Prerequi- 
sites: Physics 419, or consent of the instructor. 

430. Advanced Research. 2 cr. 

This is a one year course in which the student 
selects a research project, develops it, and prepares 
a report on the results. The student is also required 
to present results of his work at a department sem- 
inar or an appropriate scientific meeting if deemed 
advisable. A research topic is selected from those 
uggested by members of the Physics Department 
Dr other science faculty members. Work is carried 
Dut in close coordination with the selected advi- 
sor, although all work must be the student's own. 
No grade is given at the end of the first semester 
Dut a final grade is assigned at the completion of 
.he project in the Spring Semester. 



473. Atomic Physics. 3 cr. 

This course provides an introduction to special 
relativity and quantum theory with applications 
drawn mainly from modern theories of the atom. 
Topics usually included are quantum theory of 
heat radiation, the uncertainty principle, quantum 
theory of the hydrogen atom, many-electron 
atoms, atomic spectroscopy. Prerequisites: 212 
and consent of instructor. 

474. Quantum Mechanics. 3 cr. 

A basic introduction to the dynamics of quantum 
phenomena. Some of the topics covered are 
Schroedinger Equation, oscillators, hydrogen 
atom, linear operators, Hermitian Matrices, 
observables, conservation theorem, spin, angular 
momentum and perturbation theory. The course 
will emphasize application to simple systems. Pre- 
requisites: 212; Mathematics 215. 

483, 484, 485, 486. Special Topics. 1-3 cr. each 

Designed to allow the Physics major flexibility in 
scheduling, this course may include the following: 

483. Nuclear Physics. 3 cr. 

Experimental and theoretical aspects of the atomic 
nucleus are discussed. The topics presented may 
include: two-nuclear systems, radioactivity and 
modes of decay, radiometric dating, interaction of 
radiation with matter, nuclear structures and reac- 
tions, and nuclear fission. Prerequisite: 212 or 202 
and consent of the instructor. 

484. Introductory Solid State Physics. 3 cr. 

Bulk properties of materials are discussed with 
both the phenomenological and microscopic 
approaches. Typical topics are the geometric struc- 
ture of solids, waves and diffractions, thermal 
properties, the free electron model, bank theory, 
superconductivity, magnetic properties and mag- 
netic resonance. Prerequisites: 212 and consent of 
instructor. 

485. Relativistic Mechanics. 3 cr. 

This course is an introduction to the Special and 
General Theories of Relativity. A list of topics 
which may be discussed are absolute space, Ein- 
steinian Kinematics, Einsteinian Optics, space- 
time and fourvectors, relativistic particle mechan- 
ics. Prerequisites: 212, Mathematics 215. 

486. Shop Techniques. 1 cr. 

A basic introduction to machine shop practices 
necessary to experimentalists in all fields. Some of 
the areas covered are: shop equipment and its use, 
materials, soldering and welding techniques, 
mechanical drawing and schematics, electronics 
construction techniques and practical application. 

487. Problems in Physics. 1-4 cr. 

Special topics and problems in physics and related 
subjects suitable for independent work. 



488. Advanced Problems in Physics. 

Problems of a more sophisticated nature. 



1-4 cr. 



50 



489. Problems in Health Physics. 1-4 cr. 

Special topics and problems in health physics and 
related subjects suitable for independent work. 

Earth Science 

101. Physical Geology. 3 cr. 

(Prerequisite to all Earth Science courses.) This 
introduction to the geological processes and 
materials will concentrate on the makeup of our 
planet and the materials involved. Study will also 
include physical features and the processes of the 
earth, as presently understood, which have created 
those features. Geological relation to environment 
is also examined. 

102. Historical Geology. 3 cr. 

A study of the earth's history which relates tec- 
tonic movements of the crust. Mountain building 
processes and life history with their interrelations 
will be discussed. Evolution of local features will 
be discussed also with the relationship to plate 
tectonics. 

103. Physical Geology Laboratory. 1 cr. 

An introduction to the identification of rocks and 
minerals by composition and appearance and the 
interpretation of topographic maps. The use of 
maps to identify the cause of drainage and some 
effects of water and erosion will be experienced. 
Mapping tools will be introduced, as will some 
field equipment. 

104. Historical Geology Laboratory. 1 cr. 

An accompaniment for ES 102, providing an 
introduction to sedimentation and the use of fossil 
identification. Columnar sections. Aerial Geologic 
maps, and Aerial Photos will be used. 

203. Astronomy. 3 cr. 

Introduction to the study of astronomy and the 
basics of observation. Study will include telescopic 
types and the known universe as identified from 
present study. Course will, // possible, include 
arrangements with Buhl Planetarium and Alle- 
gheny Observatory. Star types and distances will 
also be examined. 

204. Meteorology. 3 cr. 

Elementary study of meteorology and weather sys- 
tems in the local area as well as the world patterns. 



Observation and prediction will be practiced when 
practical. Local and U.S. Weather Bureau services 
will be used and analyzed when possible. 

205. Planetary Geology. 3 cr. 

A systematic study of the geology of other planets 
and satellites in the solar system. Methods of 
study used to obtain information on these bodies 
will be examined along with the latest available 
information from scientific probes. 

206. Geophysics. 3 cr. 

An introduction to geophysics and its methods 
and uses. Study will include the use of geophysics 
to determine the nature of the earth's interior and 
various crustal processes such as structure, moun- 
tain building and the plate tectonics. Prerequisite: 
Physical Geology or major in Physics. 

303. Oceanography. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the marine environment 
including the geology and ecology. Attention is 
paid to the importance of dangers to the ecosys- 
tem. Characteristics of oceanic waters and circula- 
tion patterns will be discussed. 

304. Environmental Earth Science. 3 cr. 

A course based on an examination of some of the 
more common natural hazards in the geologic 
sense and Land Use Planning. Resources and their 
recovery, use and abuse in past and present and 
possible cures will be discussed. Local and 
national problems will be examined and evaluated 
from the standpoints of origin and control. 

305. Physiography of the United States. 3 cr. 

Introduces the student to the various topographic 
and physiographic differences in the contiguous 
states as well as Alaska and Hawaii. This course is 
designed to allow the student to become familiar 
with the terrain, resources, economics, and indi- 
vidual problems of the various regions of our 
country. An approach to demonstrate the fact that 
no generalization may be made to fit all areas at 
once, but different problems are associated with 
each resource and each region. 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Chairman: William E. Markus 

Political science studies the political ideas, institutions, behavior, values, and goals of human collective life. 
The department stresses an understanding of political life as a necessary complement to the study of human 
existence. Through an awareness of, and appreciation for, the similarities and differences among political 
structures and political tasks, political actors, systems of law, political ideals and thought, and the ways by 
which political activity relates to the dimensions of life as a whole, the student becomes familiar with the 
political as an expression of deeper and more fundamental considerations. Students in the Department of 
Political Science are introduced to both the normative and empirical methods of analyzing political life. 

Political science majors are prepared for careers in government and administration, teaching, private 
enterprise, and for further study in graduate and law school programs. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Twenty-four semester hours are required for a major in political science in addition to 101; these credits 
must include 208, 233, 309 and 405 or 406. 



51 



A student transferring to Duquesne from another College or University may receive a maximum of 12 
transfer credits applied to their major requirement. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

Twenty-four semester hours in International Relations are required for a major in International Relations in 
addition to 101; these credits must include 309, 312, 318 and 320 or 402. The remaining courses may be 
selected from either 320 or 402 (the one not taken for the required core), 208, 331, 409, 413, 450, 406, 321, 
315, 404 and 412. Majors in International Relations are advised to take certain courses for their college 
requirements and electives, especially in language and history. Majors are advised to carefully plan their 
courses with their advisors. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

General Minor. This minor is designed to provide the students with a comprehensive view of the entire 
discipline and is recommended for those students who may later contemplate graduate study or think that 
they might eventually like to change from a minor to a major in Political Science. It consists of a minimum 
of 1 2 credits beyond the freshman course, 101; the 1 2 credits encompass the following required courses; 208, 
233, 309, and 405 or 406. 

Concentrated Minor. The following minors, concentrated in a particular area, are also available. 

1. American Government; 233 and a minimum of nine credits from among; 235, 240, 241, 242, 276, 301, 
323. 324, 407, and 414. 

2. Comparative Government; 208 and a minimum of nine credits from among; 315, 318, 321, 408, 412, 
413. and 450. 

3. Internationa/ Relations; 309 and a minimum of nine credits from among; 312, 318, 320, 402, 404, 409, 
and 450. 

Selective Minor. The Department of Political Science will also devise a minor from its course offerings to 
fulfill the particular needs and desires of a student in any major area of concentration. Such a minor must be 
structured in consultation with an assigned Political Science Department faculty advisor and the Depart- 
ment Chairman. 
A maximum of 6 transfer credits can be applied to the minor requirement. 



101. Introduction to Political Science is prerequi- 
site to all courses. 

101. Introduction to Political Science. 3 cr. 

An investigation of the most fundamental con- 
cepts involved in the study of political society. 

208. Comparative Political Systems. 3 cr. 

A systematic, multifocused analysis of selected 
political systems. 

233. American National Government. 3 cr. 

The institutional structure and policy-making 
processes of national government are examined as 
reflections of the assumptions of liberal democracy 
and of the American social and economic systems. 
In addition to the three branches of government, 
political parties, interest groups and elections are 
considered. 

235. The Mass Media and Politics. 3 cr. 

A study of the mass media and its nature, role and 
impact on U.S. politics. The emphasis will be on 
the mass media as instruments of political com- 
munication and opinion leadership. 

240. American Political Parties. 3 cr. 

An intensive study of the roles of interest groups 
and political parties in the decision-making 
processes of the American system of government 
with attention devoted to the internal dynamics of 
these institutions. 



241. The American Presidency. 3 cr. 

A study of the role of the President at the center of 
the decision-making process in the American 
political system. 

242. The American Congress. 3 cr. 

An investigation of the operation of the Congress 
of the United States within the American system 
of government. 

243. Politics and Society. 3 cr. 

A study of political culture, political socialization, 
political participation, political elites, and social 
structure. 

276. Voting and Election Behavior. 3 cr. 

An examination of the determinants of opinions 
and political beliefs, political participation and 
voting behavior; the significance for democratic 
government of findings in these areas. 

301. State and Local Government. 3 cr. 

A study of the position of the state and local gov- 
ernments in the Federal Union. 

309. International Relations. 3 cr. 

A study of the major factors involved in interna- 
tional relations including such concepts as sover- 
eignty, nationalism, balance of power, and inter- 
national law and organization. 

312. International Law and 

Organization. 3 cr. 

A survey of the historical development and pres- 
ent role played by international law in the world 
community and the formation and operation of 



52 



such organizations as the United Nations and its 
specialized agencies. 

315. Politics of Third World Countries. 3 cr. 

A topical study of the politics of the emerging 
nations including nationalism, political integra- 
tion, political parties, and the role of the military 
and elite. 

318. Nationalism. 3 cr. 

A study of the dynamics of nationalism with 
emphasis on the role of nationalism in current 
world political problems. Includes the develop- 
ment of nationalism in Europe. 

320. United States Foreign Policy. 3 cr. 

A study of American foreign policy since the Sec- 
ond World War, with emphasis on the central 
present issues and the domestic sources of foreign 
policy. 

321. Government and Politics of 

Eastern Europe. 3 cr. 

An analysis of political developments in the com- 
munist regimes of Eastern Europe with special 
emphasis on relations between the USSR and 
Eastern Europe in the post-Stanlinist era. 

323. Constitutional Law: Federalism. 3 cr. 

A detailed examination of Supreme Court cases 
concerning the nature of American federalism — 
Congressional and Presidential power, commerce 
clause, state powers, judicial review, due process 
clauses, and apportionment. Students are intro- 
duced to court and appeals procedures, the reading 
and briefing of court decisions, and the nature of 
the court review process. 

324. Constitutional Law: 

Civil Liberties. 3 cr. 

A detailed analysis of Supreme Court decisions 
bearing upon Bill of Rights guarantees, with spe- 
cific reference to the freedoms of speech, press, 
assembly, the dimensions of search and seizure, 
right of legal counsel, equal protection and due 
process rights, voting rights, and the adjudication 
of the fourteenth amendment application of rights 
to state action. 

325. Constitutional Law: 

Criminal Law. 3 cr. 

This course will consider appellate cases in crimi- 
nal rights, and major aspects to criminal proce- 
dure. As with the Constitutional Law courses, it is 
a case approach. Students will read court decisions 
and will develop familiarity with briefing cases. 

327. Research Methods in 

Political Science. 3 cr. 

A study of the techniques of scientific inquiry into 
political phenomena including research methods, 
data collection, analysis and interpretation. 

331. Peace and the Arms Race. 3 cr. 

An analysis of the grave threat to world peace 
posed by nuclear weapons and the arms race. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to the political, ideolog- 
ical, and moral dimensions of the arms race. 



402. Soviet Foreign Policy. 3 cr. 

An analytical study of the development of Soviet 
foreign relations with special emphasis on the 
post-Stalinist era. 

404. Simulation in International Politics. 3 cr. 

Students spend the semester simulating an inter- 
national conflict situation. They act as foreign pol- 
icy decision-makers, applying the principles, con- 
cepts, and instruments of international politics. 
For majors only. 

405, 406. Western Political Thought. 3 cr. each 

A study of political ideas as distinct from and yet 
related to political institutions which constitute 
our perennial western political heritage. 405 con- 
siders theorists from the classical period to the 
early 16th Century. 406 considers theorists from 
the later 16th Century to the late 19th Century. 

407. American Political Thought. 3 cr. 

An analysis of the issues which have played a fun- 
damental role in American Politics, from colonial 
church-state problems, to modern liberalism and 
conservatism. 

408. Theory of Comparative 

Government. 3 cr. 

An examination of the basic theories and concepts 
in contemporary approaches to comparative polit- 
ical systems. 

409. Theory of International Relations. 3 cr. 

A study of various theoretical approaches to an 
understanding of international relations including 
political realism, systems analysis, decision-mak- 
ing, and equilibrium analysis. 

412. Government and Politics 

of Germany. 3 cr. 

A comparative analysis of the contemporary polit- 
ical systems of West and East Germany. 

413. Government and Politics 

of the USSR. 3 cr. 

An intensive analysis of the origin and evolution 
of the Soviet political system. 

414. Public Policy. 3 cr. 

A study of the elements, operations, and investiga- 
tion of the way governmental units decide upon 
programs and policy objectives. 

420. Contemporary Political Theory. 3 cr. 

A study of central topics in political thought from 
Marx to the present time. 

430. Internship in Practical Politics. 3 cr. 

A work and observation experience in government 
and political offices at the city, county, state, and 
national levels in the Pittsburgh area. Permission 
of department required. 



436. Honors Colloquium in 
Political Science. 

A detailed analysis of a selected topic. 



3 cr. 



53 



450. Workshop-International Studies. 3 cr. 

An intensive one-week interdisciplinary summer 
school course. This course presents politics, for- 
eign policy, culture, religion, and social problems 
of Third World Countries. Several outside speak- 
ers augument Duquesne faculty. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Chairman: Rev. David L. Smith, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 

The undergraduate program of the Department of Psychology is designed 1) to introduce and familiarize 
students with the fundamental content, issues, and interests of various areas of psychology and critically 
evaluate and reformulate these in the context of psychology as a human science; 2) to foster intellectual and 
personal freedom and critical thinking as essential to the humanizing process; 3) to prepare the profession- 
ally oriented student for advanced study; 4) to provide a foundation for careers involving human services. 
To these ends, the department offers a wide variety of courses covering psychology conceived as a human 
science, a natural science, and within a historical perspective. Further study in graduate school prepares 
students for careers in mental hospitals, schools, mental health and social welfare agencies, business and 
industry. In our rapidly changing society the demand for professionally trained psychologists is increasing. 
While the department believes that human scientific psychology is the most viable and encompassing 
approach to the study of man, it also realizes its responsibility to expose its students to other psychological 
approaches. Hence, every major who plans to enter graduate school in psychology is strongly encouraged to 
take advantage of the offerings in sister universities through the procedure of cross-registration. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

The major program consists of 103-Introduction to Psychology plus a minimum of 24 semester hours. 
These credits must include 220 and 223. Majors desiring to pursue graduate study in psychology are strongly 
advised to take six additional credits through cross-registration at other universities (Learning Theory, 
Experimental, Perception, Memory, etc.), and Statistics (225 Fundamentals of Statistics offered by the 
Mathematics department may be considered part of the mathematics/science requirement). Finally, it is 
recommended that majors enroll in a hospital or community practicum for credit, and/or do volunteer work 
in a neighborhood clinic. Three credits earned in practicum count toward the 24 required credits; an 
additional three credits in practicum may be earned above and beyond the required minimum of 24. 
Information about such opportunities can be obtained from the department academic advisor. 

The psychology department has set up a dual advisement system: departmental academic advisor and the 
faculty academic advisor. Prospective majors should consult the departmental academic advisor concerning 
the special procedure followed for the declaration of the major. 

A minimum of 15 credits in psychology exclusive of practicum must be taken at Duquesne Univesity for 
the major. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

Requirements for a minor are 103 and 223 and any three of the following: 225 or 226, 280, 328, 340, 352, 
361, 390; 400 level courses may be taken for the minor with permission of the department head. A 
minimum of nine credits in psychology must be taken at Duquesne University for the minor. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

Personal counseling services are available to all students at the Center For Training and Research in 
Phenomenological Psychology located at the Chapel end of Centennial Walk. 



103. Introduction to Psychology. 3 cr. 

(Prerequisite to all courses) 
Introduction to fundamental concepts and meth- 
ods of psychology, examined from both traditional 
and phenomenological perspectives. Prerequisite 
for all other departmental courses. 

220. Systematic Psychology. 3 cr. 

For majors only. Traditional approaches (beha- 
vioristic, physiological, psychoanalytic) to sensa- 
tion, perception, learning, and motivation. 
Required for majors. 



223. Introduction to Existential 
Phenomenological Psychology. 3 cr. 

Introduction to a human-science alternative to 
psychology as a natural science. Prerequisite for 
356 and 410; required for majors and minors. 



225. Developmental Psychology I 
(Infancy and Childhood). 

Growth and development of the child, 
emphasis on personality development. 



3cr. 

with 



54 



226. Developmental Psychology II 

(Adolescence and Maturity). 3 cr. 

Development from adolescence, through adult 
stages, to coping with death. 

230. Psychology of Community 

Experience. 3 cr. 

Experience of community phenomena, e.g., indi- 
viduals versus group priorities, intimacy vs. pri- 
vacy. 

280. History of Psychology I. 3 cr. 

Overview of figures and issues in the history of 
psychology, from precursors to present. 

328. Psychology of Personality. 3 cr. 

Critical examination of major theories of person- 
ality. 

340. Social Psychology. 3 cr. 

Foundations of social processes, attitudes, values 
and roles, public opinion, propaganda and com- 
munication, personal participation in society. 

352. Abnormal Psychology. 3 cr. 

Examination of theories and data on disordered 
human existence. 

356. Research Psychology: Theory 

and Practice. 3 cr. 

Review of theory and practice of traditional and 
human-science research. Includes student projects. 
Prerequisite: 220, 223; permission of department 
head for non-majors. 

361. Psychology of Identity 

and Fulfillment. 3 cr. 

The ways in which identity is lived individually 
and collectively. Designed to be personally rele- 
vant to the life of the student. Open to juniors and 
seniors only. 

370. Psychology of Aesthetic Experience. 3 cr. 

Theoretical and empirical explorations of aesthetic 
experience. 

390. History of Psychology II. 3 cr. 

Intensive study of selected historical figures, in 
dialogue with contemporary themes. Reading of 
primary sources. Prerequisite: 280. 

391. Applied Psychology Practicum. 3 cr. 

An applied psychology setting provides opportu- 
nity for working directly with professionals. Set- 
tings have included psychiatric hospitals and com- 
munity centers. Majors only; permission of 
Department head. Repeatable once. 



392. The Individual and His World. 3 cr. 

Examination of individual's relation to society, 
from a developmental and cross-cultural perspec- 
tive. 

393. Principles of Psychoanalytic 

Thought. 3 cr. 

Examination of the times and contributions of 
Freud and selected other major psychoanalytic 
theorists. Permission of department head for non- 
majors. 

394. Psychology of Language and 
Expression. 3 cr. 

Communication as a live, embodied relation of 
person to world and others. Emphasis is on phe- 
nomenological theorists. Permission of depart- 
ment head for non-majors. 

410. Advanced Existential- 

Phenomenological Psychology. 3 cr. 

Detailed investigation of selected works in existen- 
tial-phenomenological philosophy and psychol- 
ogy. Prerequisite: 223. Permission of department 
head for non-majors. 

432. Gestalt Psychology. 3 cr. 

Contributions of Gestalt psychology (especially 
the works of Kofka, Kohler, and Goldstein) to 
traditional and human-science psychology. Per- 
mission of department head for non-majors. 

450. Contemporary Issues in 

Clinical Psychology. 3 cr. 

A human-science examination of the approach, 
methods, data, and current issues of clinical psy- 
chology. Permission of department head for non- 
majors. 

457. Independent Studies. 3 cr. 

A tutorial course for an exceptional student who 
wishes to pursue a particular study with a faculty 
member. For majors only; usually those intending 
graduate study; advanced coursework completed. 
Permission of faculty member and department 
head required. 

490. Special Topic. 1-4 cr. 

A visiting professor presents his/her specialty, or a 
regular faculty member presents highly specialized 
studies or an experimental course. Repeatable. 
Prerequisites vary with the instructor. Permission 
of department head for non-majors. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

Chairman: Chester A. Jurczak, Ph.D. 

Undergraduate instruction in sociology contributes to the liberal education of students regardless of majors 
and to the preprofessional training leading to graduate work in sociology and social work, urban affairs, 
urban planning, and criminology. Helping students in practical ways to live effectively and to become 
effective in practical attacks on social problems is another objective of the department. 

Sociology studies all of this formally in courses designed to give students a sense of direction, a selective 
taste of materials and methods, and motivation so that they can devote some of their energies to indepen- 
dent observation and experimentation, and develop their own concepts about how society functions. 



55 



AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 



Sociology. The orientation of sociology is independent in the sense that it is concerned with what men in 
groups try to achieve and how successful they are. Sociology is oriented around the problem of what men in 
groups actually do, how they interact to meet needs where they are. 

Recommended courses: 101, 104, 201, 202, 205, 2 1 4, 2 1 5, 304, 307, 308, 309, 313,315, 323, 325, 34 1 , 492. 

Criminal Justice. Founded in a broad-based liberal arts curriculum, this program is designed to provide the 
student with the opportunity to develop his potential as a professional in many areas of the criminal justice 
field, including probation, parole, investigation, corrections, and research. 
Recommended courses: 101, 103, 245, 246, 250, 264, 265, 266, 290, 302, 310, 313, 335, 467. 

Gerontology. As the size and characteristics of the "elderly" segment of the population have changed, there 
has been increased interest in the study of the aging process, its effects on the individual and society, and its 
meaning for the future. The Gerontology program is designed to develop the knowledge and skills required 
for a student's preparation as a professional in this specialty area. 
Recommended courses: 101, 210, 317, 324, 327, 411. 

Social Services. The principle that is the basis for this program is that classroom learning provides the 
foundation out of which effective social/human services may be built. Preparation for professional training 
and skill development is the emphasis. 

Recommended courses: 101, 103, 212, 213, 314, 450, 451. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

A minimum of 24 semester hours, not including 101 is required for a major in Sociology; these credits must 
include 201 and 304. In consultation with the undergraduate academic advisor, the major may select a 
concentration in general Sociology, Criminal Justice, Gerontology, or Social Services/Human Services. The 
suggested course numbers for these concentrated areas are listed above with the corresponding titles and 
descriptions in the following section. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

A minimum of 12 semester hours, not including 101, is required for a minor; 450, 451, 488 and 492 are 
reserved for majors only. Minors may select a concentration in one of four areas above in consultation with 
the department advisor. 



Sociology 101 is a prerequisite to all courses 
except 103 Criminal Justice and 103 Social Work. 
All 300 and 400 courses are for juniors and seniors 
only. 

Sociology 

101. Survey of Sociology. 3 cr. 

A broad survey of the social and cultural aspects of 
environment. 

104. Social Anthropology. 3 cr. 

Study of the cultural aspects of human existence in 
early man and modern society. 

201. Sociological Theories. 3 cr. 

A study of selected European and American theo- 
rists. For sociology majors and minors only. 

202. Sociology of Social Problems. 3 cr. 

Study of person-structure-change framework 
applicable to contemporary social issues. 

205. Person and Society. 3 cr. 

Exploration of socialization, the person's interac- 
tion with structure and culture, small groups and 
collective behavior. 

214. Sociology of the Child and 

Adolescent. 3 cr. 

Discussion of the child and adolescent socializa- 
tion process in American society. 



215. Computer Uses in the 

Social Sciences. 3 cr. 

An introduction into computer related skills, with 
a focus on data management, use of "canned" pro- 
grams and the univac computer system. 

304. Methods in Sociology. 3 cr. 

Discussion and application of techniques and 
research procedures used in sociological research. 

307. Leisure and Popular Culture. 3 cr. 

Study of relationship between work, leisure and 
popular culture; leisure as a social problem will be 
considered. 

308. Ethnic Groups. 3 cr. 

Comprehensive survey of roles performed and 
problems faced by ethnic groups. 

309. Women in Society. 3 cr. 

The role of women in culture and the study of 
women's movements for liberation. 

313. Sociology of Sexual Behavior. 3 er. 

Discussion of sociological studies of sexual behav- 
ior. 

315. Social Development — Infancy 

to Death. 3 cr. 

Study of the socializing process from the infant 
state to the dying state. 



56 



323. Medical Sociology. 3 cr. 

Study of the impact of values and related struc- 
tures on health maintenance, personnel and insti- 
tutions; discussion of the social system of health 
organizations. 

325. Family Systems. 3 cr. 

Comparative study of the family; the interaction 
of the family with other community institutions. 

341. Sociological Measurement. 3 cr. 

Discussion of techniques and problems in socio- 
logical measurement. 

492. Selected Readings. 1-3 cr. 

For sociology majors only. 

Criminal Justice 

103. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the criminal justice process, 
including police, courts, correctional facilities and 
community based corrections. 

245. Treatment of Juvenile Offenders. 3 cr. 

Study of the movement of juvenile offenders 
through the criminal justice system — police, pros- 
ecution, courts, and corrections. 

246. Treatment of Adult Offenders. 3 cr. 

Study of the movement of adult offenders through 
the criminal justice system. 

250. Investigation, Evidence 

and Procedures. 3 cr. 

Study of case preparation, questioning of wit- 
nesses, collection and preservation of evidence 
and processing of criminal evidence. 

264. Police Community Relations. 3 cr. 

Discussion of the context of police — community 
relations; their interaction, improvement and 
change strategies. 

265. Critical Issues in Law 

Enforcement (Police). 3 cr. 

Analysis of police in a free society; ethnic tension, 
police discretion, civil disobedience, police con- 
duct and integrity. 

266. Crime Prevention. 3 cr. 

Study of contemporary crime prevention pro- 
grams involving criminal justice agencies, citizens 
and community politics. 

290. Criminalistics. 3 cr. 

Collection of evidence, fingerprints, microscopic 
and laboratory study of firearms, hair, fibers, 
blood, paints, poisons, and other clues. 

302. Evaluative Research in 

Criminal Justice. 3 cr. 

Study of techniques for research and evaluation of 
criminal justice programs. 

310. Juvenile Law. 3 cr. 

A survey of those aspects of the legal system that 
relate to the identification, processing and rehabil- 
itation of the juvenile offender. 



313. Delinquency and Society. 3 cr. 

A study of the phenomenon, theories and causa- 
tion of juvenile delinquency. 

335. Criminology. 3 cr. 

A study of sociological explanations of criminality; 
correlates, causation, and crimogenic conditions. 

467. Correctional Casework and 

Counseling. 3 cr. 

Study of the counseling styles and individualized 
models for offender classification, and group and 
process models of counseling. 

Gerontology 

210. Sociology of Aging. 3 cr. 

Discussion of medical aspects of aging, diseases of 
aging, and health maintenance. 

317. Aged and Social Service. 3 cr. 

Study of problems associated with the elderly and 
the social services developed to assist them. 

324. Social Aspects of Death 

and Dying. 3 cr. 

A study of American values, behavior, custom, 
and other institutional practices related to dying 
and death with special attention to the older 
Americans. 

327. Counseling of the Older Adult. 3 cr. 

A study of helping techniques in relation to retire- 
ment problems and physical, social, psychological 
losses of the elderly. 

411. Aging and Health. 3 cr. 

Discussion of medical aspects of aging, diseases of 
aging, and health maintenance. 

Social Services/Human Services 

103. Introduction to Social Work. 3 cr. 

Survey of the history and areas of social work- 
casework, group work and community organiza- 
tion, public and private programs. 

212. The Helping Process. 3 cr. 

Discussion of the social process of helping others, 
ranging from the consideration of the professional, 
the population a person serves and the dynamics 
of the interaction. The perspective is person- 
social. 

213. Intervention Skills. 3 cr. 

Discussion of social work skills; practice in field 
evaluated. 

314. Social Work Methods. 3 cr. 

Study of case study, study-diagnosis-therapy pro- 
cess, interviewing, counseling, and program plan- 
ning. Prerequisite: Social Services 103. For sociol- 
ogy majors and minors only. 

450. Field Work I. 3-12 cr. 

Internship in a social work agency, criminal justice 
or gerontology setting. Majors only. 

451. Field Work II. 3-12 cr. 

Internship in a social work agency, criminal justice 
or gerontology setting. Majors only. 



57 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE 

Chairman: Eva C. Robotti, M.A. 

The program provides training essential to the several areas of speech communication. The department 
offers both its major and interested students from other fields the opportunity to choose courses from a 
particular area of concentration or the whole range of the discipline. 

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

Social Communication. This focuses on the theories and techniques of human communication on both the 
personal and societal levels. The student of social communication examines the concepts and procedures 
which govern men's interactions as individuals and as parts of the mass. He also learns the practical arts of 
critical analysis and persuasive communication. 

This training is excellent preparation for careers in law, government, administration, personnel, public 
relations, industrial communications, advertising, sales, social work, and all fields which involve human 
symbolic interaction. Internships are available to students who qualify. 

Recommended courses: 101, 102, 204, 206, 208, 302, 304, 306, 311, 402, 411, 412. 

Theatre/Media. The Theatre/Media concentration combines Aesthetic Communication skills, theatre his- 
tory and theatre performance skills with media theory and skills. This concentration prepares the student for 
the fields of applied communication: theatre, radio, television and public relations. Along with classroom 
theory and practice, students will have an opportunity to obtain practical experience onstage and backstage 
in Red Masquers productions and by participating in on-and-off-the-air work at WDUQ (90.5), Duquesne's 
twenty-five thousand watt National Public Radio affiliate. 

Courses in Radio and TV announcing and TV production afford the student the opportunity to work in a 
fully equipped TV studio. Internships are available to students who qualify. 

Recommended courses: 140, 141, 190, 204, 251, 280, 290, 351, 352, 370, 400, 412, 451, 470, 490. 

Speech Pathology/Audiology. The profession of Speech Pathology/Audiology is concerned with impair- 
ments in the processes of communication — speech, language, and hearing. Upon completion of graduate 
education, a speech pathologist or audiologist may provide clinical services or work in basic and applied 
research. He or she may be employed in schools, hospitals, laboratories, community service centers, or 
colleges and universities. Speech pathology and audiology is a rapidly growing field, and the demand for 
trained personnel far exceeds the supply. 

This area of concentration at Duquesne is a pre-professional program designed to prepare the student for 
graduate study in speech pathology and audiology. The student concentrating in Speech Pathology/Audi- 
ology may be eligible to register for Speech 322, 422 with a 3.00 QPA in his/her major, completion of all 
required courses and the permission of the department chairman. 

Required courses: 120, 140, 204, 220, 221, 320, 420, 426. 

Co-requirements: Psychology 225, 352. 

Advised: Mathematics 225. 

Prospective Speech Pathology majors should declare the major before they begin their junior year. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

A minimum of 30 semester hours is required for a major in Speech Communication and Theatre. Majors 
will be required to enroll in three of the following courses: 101, 102, 140, 141, 190, 204. Speech Pathology/ 
Audiology concentrates will be required to enroll in Speech 120, 140, 204, 220. 

A maximum of 12 transfer credits in speech can be applied to the major requirements. A maximum of 6 
credits may be taken in Independent Study and/or Speech/Media Internship. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

The minor consists of 18 credits: six credits in required introductory courses and 12 additional credits. 
There are four emphases that the student may follow: 

1. Social Communication: 101, 102, plus 12 credits in any of the following: 204, 206, 208, 302, 304, 306, 
311, 402, 404, 411. 

2. Theatre/Media: 140, 190, plus 12 credits in any of the following: 141, 251, 280, 290, 351, 352, 370, 451, 
470, 490. 

3. Speech Pathology/Audiology: 120, 220, plus 12 additional credits. Courses 320, 426 are required; the 
remaining six credits may be taken in any of the following: 221, 420, 425. 

4. General Speech Communication and Theatre: 190 and either 101 or 102, with 12 additional credits 
apportioned in the following manner: six credits in any of the following: 204, 206, 208, 302, 304, 306, 311, 
402, 404, plus six credits in any of these: 140, 141, 251, 280, 290, 351, 370, 451, 490. 

Suggested activities for majors and minors in Speech Communication and Theatre include the Red 
Masquer Dramatic Organization, WDUQ Radio and Television, The Debate Team, the Duke (student 



58 

newspaper), and United Nations Organization. Suggested courses for fulfilling Communication Area 
requirements for non-Speech majors: 101, 102, 140, 190. 



400. Independent Study (All areas 

of concentration). 1-3 cr. 

The student will work on a selected project under 
the supervision and guidance of a faculty member. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and 
Department Chairperson. May be taken twice. 

Social Communication 

101. Communication and Society I. 3 cr. 

Examines how man. a being who must believe, 
communicates his beliefs and how he utilizes cer- 
tain kinds of beliefs which have proven funda- 
mental through the ages to assist or expolit his 
fellow man. 

102. Techniques of Oral Communication. 3 cr. 

Develops those communicative skills necessary to 
critically analyze verbal discourse and to perform 
effectively in public speaking siutations which 
confront the educated person. 

204. Interpersonal Communication. 3 cr. 

Designed to investigate the various aspects of 
interpersonal communication. Primary considera- 
tion will be given face-to-face human interaction 
in a variety of situations. 

206. Discussion and Group Process. 3 cr. 

Develops those communicative skills essential for 
functioning effectively in the small-group situa- 
tion. Prerequisite: 204. 

208. Nonverbal Communication. 3 cr. 

Nonverbal messages are those messages transmit- 
ted without the aid of language, or in conjunction 
with language. They carry much information 
about the emotional state of the sender. Some 
components of nonverbal communication to be 
covered arc: body movement, physical attributes, 
physical alterations, dress, space, time, touch, 
objects, the eyes and the human voice. 

302. Organizational Communication. 3 cr. 

Stresses the acquisition and application of skills 
that will bring success in an organizational setting. 
Prerequisite: 204 and 206. 

304. Persuasion. 3 cr. 

A study and application of principles and practices 
that influence people's beliefs and actions. Prereq- 
uisite: Either 101 or 102 or permission of the 
instructor. 

306. Advanced Public Speaking. 3 cr. 

Students will be directed in the design and produc- 
tion of the problem-solving presentation on a 
major world problem. Presentations will be given 
before live audiences from local high schools or 
civic organizations. If possible, presentations will 
be videotaped. Prerequisite: 102 and either 101 or 
304. 



311. Communication and Society II. 3 cr. 

Develops more completely and pholsophically the 
rhetorical perspective established in "Communi- 
cation & Society I" by applying that particular 
perspective to contemporary systems of belief. 
Prerequisite: 101 or permission of the instructor; 
recommended 304. 

402. Argumentation and Debate. 3 cr. 

A course in applying the principles and methods 
of critical deliberation to a signicant contemporary 
social issue. Emphasis will be on advocating, 
defending, and refuting a proposition of policy. 
Prerequisite: 102 or permission of the instructor. 

404. Intercultural Communication. 3 cr. 

An investigation into the similar and different per- 
ceptions of reality held by individuals and cultural 
groups and how such perceptions affect the com- 
munications process. Prerequisite: 101, 208. 

411. Communication and Imagination. 3 cr. 

Examines how the triumph of beliefs dominated 
by imagination over beliefs dominated by science 
has changed our understanding of com- 
munication. 

412. Speech/Media Internship. 1-3 cr. 

An internship in communication industry or 
appropriate organizational setting. Prerequisite: 
Permission of department chairman required. 
May be taken twice. 

Speech Pathology/Audiology 

120. Development of Language. 3 cr. 

Focus will be on the acquisition of sound, mean- 
ing and grammar systems from infancy through 
childhood with emphasis on the comparative anal- 
ysis of theories of communication development. 
Physical, neurological, psychological, and social 
bases of language will be discussed. Socio-linguis- 
tic differences will be discussed with reference to 
Black language and regional variations. 

121. Sign Language 

(Manual Communication). 2 cr. 

Sign language systems used by and with the deaf 
and hearing impaired will be presented in an over- 
all introductory methods course. Participants will 
be able to demonstrate ability to fingerspell and 
use basic signs in simple phrases and sentences. 
Aspects of current trends in Deaf Awareness will 
be included. 

140. Phonetics. 3 cr. 

An approach to the English language based upon 
the fundamentals of vocal and articulatory speech 
sounds as systematized by the International Pho- 
netic Association. 



59 



204. Interpersonal Communication. 3 cr. 

Designed to investigate the various aspects of 
interpersonal communication. Primary considera- 
tion will be given face-to-face human interactions 
in a variety of situations. 

220. Introduction to Problems 

in Speech. 3 cr. 

A survey of various speech disorders, their causes, 
recognition, and possible therapy. 

221. Anatomy and Physiology. 3 cr. 

This course will study the basic neurological, skel- 
etal, and muscular structures involved in the 
speech and hearing process. Prerequisite: 220 or 
permission of the instructor. 

320. Clinical Techniques in 

Speech Pathology. 3 cr. 

This course will focus upon the clinical manage- 
ment of speech and hearing problems. Past and 
current therapeutic approaches and techniques 
will be presented in relation to disorders of speech 
and hearing. Different organizational procedures 
and practices will also be included. Prerequisite: 
120, 220 or permission of the instructor. 

322. Speech Pathology/Audiology 

Externship. 3 cr. 

Provides opportunities for observation of various 
aspects of clinical work. Directed readings and 
field trips are included. For Speech Pathology/ 
Audiology concentration majors only. Written 
permission of department chairman required. 
Open to juniors and/or seniors. 

420. Speech Problems of the 

Exceptional Child. 3 cr. 

This course will investigate the speech and lan- 
guage development, speech problems, and speech 
remediation of the mentally retarded, brain 
injured, aphasic, learning disabled, and cerebral 
palsied child. The role of other professionals, in 
addition to that of the speech pathologist in speech 
remediation, will be explored. Prerequisite: 120, 
140. 220, 221, 320 or permission of the instructor. 

422. Speech Pathology/Audiology 

Clinical Practicum. 3 cr. 

Provides an opportunity for active participation 
with professionals in their work in varied settings. 
For Speech Pathology/Audiology concentration 
majors only. Written permission of department 
chairman required. 

425. Aural Rehabilitation. 3 cr. 

The human communication systems are presented 
including acoustic and visual components. Com- 
munication problems of the hearing impaired are 
discussed with regard to amplification, residual 
hearing, visual perception and manual communi- 
cation. Programs of rehabilitation for individuals 
with mild to profound hearing impairments are 
reviewed. Prerequisite: 220, 221 or permission of 
instructor. 



426. Hearing and Audiology. 3 cr. 

This course will consider the nature of sound, the 
process of hearing, and hearing impairment. The 
different types, causes, and the measurement of 
hearing impairment will be discussed. Exposure to 
audiometric testing will also be available. Prereq- 
uisite: 220, 221 or permission of the instructor. 

Theatre/Media 

140. Phonetics. 3 cr. 

An approach to the English language based upon 
the fundamentals of vocal and articulatory speech 
sounds as systematized by the International Pho- 
netic Association. 

141. Voice and Diction for the Media. 3 cr. 

Designed to meet the needs of those who will be 
required to use voice and diction as professional 
tools in the training and pursuit of media careers, 
i.e., Radio/Television, Theatre and Medical 
Media. Not limited to Media Majors. 

190. Introduction to Theatre Arts. 3 cr. 

A survey of theatre as an art form, involving the 
selective integration of a number of skills and dis- 
ciplines to bring about the aesthetic of the theatri- 
cal moment. Beginning with lectures on the roles 
of the director, actor, designer, and various 
craftsmen, the course will work up to a sampling 
of the various modes and forms of drama in terms 
of exigencies of production. 

204. Interpersonal Communication. 3 cr. 

Designed to investigate the various aspects of 
interpersonal communication. Primary considera- 
tion will be given face-to-face human interaction 
in a variety of situations. 

251. Radio Announcing I. 3 cr. 

Application of the principles of good speech to the 
announcing of news, sports, weather and commer- 
cials, and to the art of interviewing. 

280. Acting I. 3 cr. 

A study of the basic principles, theories, and tech- 
niques of acting, including various problems con- 
fronted by the actor in the creation and interpreta- 
tion of a role on television or film. Prerequisite: 
190 or permission of instructor. 

290. History of the Theatre. 3 cr. 

The development of theatre as an art form in 
Western civilization and in the Orient: styles and 
methods of production, artistic conventions, 
growth of formal theatres, etc., as manifestations 
of how man has seen his world through the ages. 

351. Television Announcing. 3 cr. 

Continuation of Radio Announcing but with the 
added skills necessary to T.V. Prerequisite: 251. 

352. Radio Announcing II. 3 cr. 

Continuation of Radio Announcing I with empha- 
sis on interviewing and location reporting. Addi- 
tional foreign pronunciation exercises. Prerequi- 
site: 251. 



60 



370. Oral Communication of Literature. 3 cr. 

An approach to literature in terms of its oral tradi- 
tions with special emphasis on techniques prepar- 
atory to the act of oral presentation. 

412. Speech/Media Internship. 1-3 cr. 

An internship in communication industry or 
appropriate organizational setting. Prerequisite: 
Permission of department chairman required. 
May be taken twice. 

451. T.V. Practicum. 3 cr. 

The essentials of developing dramatic productions 
for television: scripted commercials, serious and 
comic performances, acted and taped. Prerequi- 
site: permission of the instructor. 



470. Advanced Oral Communication 

of Literature. 3 cr. 

A continuation of 370 with special emphasis on 
techniques for the oral presentation of specific lit- 
erary genres. Prerequisite: 370. 

490. American Theatre and Drama. 3 cr. 

Survey of the major American theatrical move- 
ments and dramatic literature from the Colonial 
period to the present with emphasis on the twenti- 
eth century. Playwrights, designers, and theatrical 
companies are studied as reflections of American 
culture. 



DEPARTMENT OF THEOLOGY 

Chairman: John F. O'Grady, S.T.D.; SSD 

Duquesne's Department of Theology affirms that the academic study of religious experience is essential to a 
complete education. The Department fulfills its role in theological studies by the pursuit of the following 
aims: 1) it emphasizes Catholic Theology, in dialogue with other Christian traditions, non-Christian tradi- 
tions and Judaism, as the key element in Duquesne's commitment to Catholic education on the university 
level; 2) it acknowledges the fact of the universal search for religious meaning and experience, and seeks not 
only to offer the possibility of a study of the varying approaches to religious witnesses in history, but also to 
place Catholic Theology in communion with that quest; 3) it aspires to a fruitful encounter with other 
university disciplines, since the department is convinced that theology's concerns are related to all vital 
human issues. 

Accordingly, the Department has organized its courses into three divisions: Biblical Studies, Christian 
Studies, and Selected Religious Studies. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

The major program consists of a minimum of 27 credits. These must include 106, 213, 214, 220, 250, 498; 
the remaining credits will be chosen in consultation with the student's advisor. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

A minor consists of four courses. 

The department has also prepared suggested sequences which may be helpful to a student wishing to 
concentrate in a certain area of theology; e.g., Biblical Studies, Roman Catholic Theology, World Religions, 
Religion and Culture, Christianity in History, etc. 

COURSE INFORMATION 

The numbering of the course indicates the level of approach. 

100 These courses are of the basic, survey type, wherein emphasis is on breadth rather than on depth, 

and serve as background for other courses. 

200-300 These courses treat of subject matter in a specific area of theology and in greater depth than in the 
100 category. 



400 



Selected topics are dealt with at a more advanced level; independent research is required. 



Biblical Studies 

114. Interpreting the Bible. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the principles involved in 
interpreting the Bible in relation to its different 
manners of expression; a study of key sections of 
the Bible to determine what these materials meant 
to those who wrote them and what their relevance 
is today. 

213. Introduction to the Old Testament. 3 cr. 

A presentation of the Old testament writings in 
their dynamic context of culture, politics, and 



geography, as well as an introduction to their liter- 
ary modes, theologies, and themes, including prac- 
tical approaches to interpreting key passages of the 
Old Testament. 

214. Introduction to the New Testament. 3 cr. 

A presentation of the books of the New Testa- 
ment, including their literary makeup, historical 
origins and testimony, and theological content; 
practical approaches in interpreting key passages 
of the New Testament. 



61 



313. Archaeology and the Bible. 3 cr. 

An illumination through archaeology of the histor- 
ical setting, the cultural background, and the 
events described in the Bible; a general introduc- 
tion to the techniques of archaeological investiga- 
tion and a study of the principal archaeological 
sites in Palestine. 



316. The Apostle Paul. 3 cr. 

An exposition of Pauline Literature, emphasizing 
the person of Paul and his impact on the early 
Church. 



321. Jesus in the Gospels. 3 cr. 

A portrait of the person of Jesus Christ, based on a 
study of the 4 gospels, with ample usage of recent 
scholarship. 

413. The Old Testament 

Understandings of God. 3 cr. 

Examination of the Theology of the various books 
or blocks of writing in the Old Testament; an 
attempt to draw together and present the major 
themes, motifs, and concepts of the Old Testa- 
ment; a study of the relationship between the Old 
Testament and the New Testament. Prerequisite: 
114 or 213. 

414. Jesus Through Many Eyes. 3 cr. 

The fact of Jesus is everything he stands for. And 
every book of the New Testament has its inter- 
preter of it. A study of different books as well as 
themes in the New Testament. 

490. Field Experience in Biblical 

Archaeology. 3 cr. 

Six weeks of supervised participation in an 
archaeological excavation in the Ancient Near 
East; experience in stratigraphic digging, pottery 
identification, scientific analysis of finds, and 
recording methods. Offered every two or three 
years; approval of participants by core staff 
required. 

493. Individual Topics in Biblical Studies. 1-3 cr. 

The topics will change regularly and will be pub- 
lished within the department. 

Christian Studies In General 

140. Christian Understanding of the 

Human Person. 3 cr. 

An investigation into the question of "What does 
it mean to be human?", according to Judaeo- 
Christian teaching; a discussion of the relationship 
of the human person to self, others, the world, and 
the Divine as the basis for humanness; a study of 
the issues involved in these four relationships, e.g., 
freedom, grace, contemplation. 

235. Christian Worship. 3 cr. 

The meaning of ritual and worship in Christianity 
with special emphasis given to the history of wor- 
ship and the developments in both Roman Catho- 
lic and Protestant worship since the Vatican 
Council. 



243. Religion and Social Issues. 3 cr. 

A study of the influence of religious convictions in 
confronting major social issues of today's world, 
e.g., population growth, famine, ecology, libera- 
tion and revolution, truth as a social issue, wealth, 
taxation, and stewardship. 

260. Protestantism. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the thought of the principal 
reformers: Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, Wesley; a 
study of speculative and practical forces operative 
in the fifteenth-sixteenth centuries which gave rise 
to the reforming movement; the formulation of 
Protestant Orthodoxy. 

271. Eastern Christianity. 3 cr. 

A study of the main theological developments in 
the Eastern Church from the Patristic age on 
through the medieval times until the modern days 
as they shape its distinctive spirit and mentality 
and as they are interpreted in the Eastern 
Churches. 

274. Church History I. 3 cr. 

A religious and historical exploration of the 
growth of Christianity from the first century up to 
the Reformation; discussion of those issues within 
the Church and the external forces which brought 
about major conflict and development. 

275. Church History II. 3 cr. 

Selected topics in Catholic and Protestant devel- 
opment from 1 500 to the present day; special 
emphasis on the crises, revolutions, and reforms 
that were central to this development. 

345. Women and Christianity. 3 cr. 

Survey of the Old and New Testament views of 
women and a history of the status of women in the 
Roman Catholic and major Protestant traditions 
with emphasis on the contemporary role and spiri- 
tuality of women in Christianity. 

351. Sexuality, Sex, and Morality. 3 cr. 

An analysis of the nature of sex and sexuality, 
according to the sources and developments of 
Christian thought; the integration of these con- 
cepts into a contemporary moral and ethical 
system. 

352. Human Life and Morality. 3 cr. 

A discussion of the fundamental moral principles 
involved in making any of the "life decisions," the 
problem of the definition of life; a survey of the 
varied moral approaches to the issues of war and 
peace, capital punishment, abortion, birth control, 
euthanasia, genetic engineering, and the new 
embryology. 

451. War and Peace in Christian 

Perspective. 3 cr. 

An analysis of Christian teaching of the moral per- 
missibility of using violence and participation in 
war from biblical times to the present, including 
an evaluation of the varieties of pacifism, of non- 
violent resistence, and of just war theories. 



62 



470. Christian Mysticism. 3 cr. 

A study of the manifold Christian experience of 
mysticism, i.e., experiential contact with God, as 
seen in famous exemplars of mystical experience, 
e.g., Jesus Christ, Paul, Ignatius of Antioch, 
Augustine. John Ruysbroeck, Catherine of Siena, 
Theresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Venerable 
Liberman. 

494. Individual Topics in 

Christian Studies. 1-3 cr. 

The topics will change regularly and will be pub- 
lished within the department. 

Roman Catholic Theology 

106. Faith and Experience. 3 cr. 

An examination of various forms of atheism and 
an exploration of Christian responses to their chal- 
lenge; a study of the meaning of faith and revela- 
tion in its history and contemporary expression; 
an attempt to answer the question of faith's 
reasonableness. 

108. Catholicism. 3 cr. 

An explanation of the spirit, beliefs and practices 
of Roman Catholicism including its understand- 
ing of sacramentality, mediation and communion; 
a study of the Roman Catholic classics and issues 
confronting Roman Catholicism. 

220. The Mystery of Christ. 3 cr. 

A study of the person and meaning of Christ in 
historical and contemporary perspective; a discus- 
sion of the new bond between God and humanity 
and the new era in the spirituality of humanity 
inaugurated by the Incarnation and the Passion- 
Death-Resurrection event. 

230. The Church. 3 cr. 

A study of the Christian community of believers 
in its origins, some of its major historical and dog- 
matic emphases, and its contemporary under- 
standing of itself; the Church as a mystery, as Mys- 
tical Body, as People of God, as sacrament. 

242. Contemporary Theological Issues. 3 cr. 

An examination of theological developments in an 
era of renewal, reevaluation, and cooperation; e.g., 
belief and unbelief; Christian and secular human- 
ism; the future with reference to hope, heaven, 
hell, afterlife, and resurrection; sin in a secular age; 
suffering and evil. 

250. Conscience and Morality. 3 cr. 

A catholic perspective of the basic issues involved 
in the formulation of moral values with the devel- 
oping person, and of the sources upon which 
moral systems are based; a discussion of the abso- 
lute vs. the relative, traditional morality vs. "the 
new morality"; and application of these principles 
to modern problems. 

256. God and His Meaning. 3 cr. 

A theological understanding of the problem of 
God; a consideration of the responses of various 
religions and philosophies to this problem; the ori- 
gins and development of the theology of God in 



the Judaeo-Christian tradition with special focus 
on Catholic development. 

301. Marriage. 3 cr. 

A personally-oriented and practical treatment of 
the marital union as seen in its Christian theologi- 
cal, psychological, and sexual aspects; a discussion 
of Christian marriage as a bond of love, as a sacra- 
ment, and as a way of human fulfillment. 

331. The Church in the Modern World. 3 cr. 

An analysis of the Church's role in human devel- 
opment today and in offering solutions to present 
problems of humanity in light of Vatican IPs 
"Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Mod- 
ern World" and other related documents. 

335. Theology of the Sacraments. 3 cr. 

A practical treatment of the seven sacraments in 
relation to their significance for the Christian's 
daily spiritual growth and fulfillment; considera- 
tion of human needs for ritual and symbol; discus- 
sion of recent revisions and developments in sac- 
ramental theology. 

475. Theology and Catechesis. 3 cr. 

An examination of the principal theological and 
pedagogical themes of modern religious education, 
and of the place of catechesis in the ministry of the 
Church; a presentation of the historical back- 
ground of the contemporary catechetical renewal. 

491. Experience in the Teaching 

of Religion. 6 cr. 

One semester of supervised experience in teaching 
religion in a high school environment in conjunc- 
tion with a cooperating high school teacher and 
University Department coordinator. This course 
is open only to majors in Theology upon approval 
of the Chairperson of the Department. 

495. Individual Topics in 

Roman Catholic Studies 1-3 cr 

The topics will change regularly and will be pub- 
lished within the department. 

498. Seminar in Theology. 3 cr. 

A critical analysis of selected topics in theology or 
of selected works by outstanding theologians; open 
only to juniors and seniors with a major or minor 
in theology. 

Selected Religious Studies 

180. Religious Experience. 3 cr. 

An examination of the dimensions of mankind's 
religious experience, e.g., mystical, ritual, mythi- 
cal, ethical, and scriptural; an analysis of the like- 
ness and differences of how the Divine is sensed 
and responded to in varied geographical, cultural, 
and chronological contexts. 

240. Studies in Black Theology. 3 cr. 

An examination of the dimensions of the religious 
experience of Black Americans, e.g., its history, its 
relationship to African origins, to slavery, to 
racism, to Christianity and to Christian denomi- 
nations; an analysis of special elements in that 



63 



experience: e.g.. Black Churches, preaching, music 
and the "American Way of Life." 

280. World Religions. 3 cr. 

A survey of the history, beliefs, practices, and con- 
temporary influence of the major religions of the 
world: Hinduism. Buddhism. Confucianism, Tao- 
ism. Maoism. Shintoism, African traditions. Juda- 
ism. Christianity, and Islam: a discussion of a 
basic methodology for understanding religions. 

283, 284. Judaism: People & Faith. 3 cr. each 

A survey of modern Jewish history to discover 
roots and traditions of the Jewish people in Amer- 
ican. Israel and the Soviet Union . . .view of the 



Holocaust and its effects on world Jewry. The 
faith, beliefs and practices of Jewish life today. 

372. Religious Themes in Literature 

and Film. 3 cr. 

An exploration of religious experience and reli- 
gious concepts as expressed in significant worlds in 
film and literature, including themes concerning 
human person's relationhsip to self, others, and to 
God. 

496. Individual Topics in 

Religious Studies. 1-3 cr. 

The topics will change regularly and will be pub- 
lished within the department. 




64 



School of Business 
and Administration 



HISTORY 

The School of Business and Administration was 
established in 1913 as the School of Accounts and 
Finance. The rapid growth of the School necessi- 
tated a constant broadening of the curriculum 
until it covered all business subjects of fundamen- 
tal importance. 

In 1931 it was designated the School of Business 
Administration and, with this change, definitely 
became a professional school of business adminis- 
tration. 

In 1971 the name was changed to the present 
designation to indicate broader preparation for 
activity in organizations of all types. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

In accord with the educational philosophy and 
objectives of the University, the School of Busi- 
ness and Administration aims to assist students in 
their development of the natural and supernatural - 
virtues. The general aim is to provide through the 
media of instruction and related collegiate activity 
the facilitation of purposeful character, intellectual 
accomplishment, emotional and social maturity, 
and professional efficiency. 

The School of Business and Administration has 
the professional responsibility of developing in 
students such knowledge of business principles, 
procedures and problems as will enable them to 
become self-sustaining members of the commu- 
nity, aware of their social and public responsibili- 
ties and dedicated to the enrichment of the 
resources for worthy living. 

It seeks to produce graduates who, upon enter- 
ing their chosen careers, will be effectively pre- 
pared to discharge their obligations to God, their 
community, and themselves as intellectual and 
moral beings. 

The School attains this objective by guiding stu- 
dents through a cultural core program, a business 
core program, an elective area of advanced busi- 
ness subjects chosen on the basis of professional 
interests, co-curricular and extra-curricular activ- 
ites. and established personnel services. 

As a division of the University, the School of 
Business and Administration is obviously dedi- 
cated to promoting those University aims and 
objectives contained in the general statement. 

The professional objective of the School of Busi- 
ness and Administration is to produce graduates 
who have acquired and developed: 

1. An appreciation of the importance of initia- 
tive and who consequently are willing to assume 
responsibility, work efficiently and harmoniously 
with others, and adjust to changing circumstances. 

2. A respect for logical thinking and who strive 
energetically, therefore, to develop the capacities 



for analytical reasoning through the vigorous and 
orderly application of ethical and technical princi- 
ples to problem solving. 

3. An understanding of the personal and profes- 
sional value of effective communications and a 
cultivation of their capacities for speaking and 
writing clearly and concisely. 

4. An awareness of the important role of quanti- 
tative measurements in today's business and who 
have become skilled in the interpretation of math- 
ematical, accounting and statistical data with com- 
puter usage. 

5. Sufficient knowledge in a professional area so 
that they can assume positions of responsibility 
with a background of learning-method and learn- 
ing-impulse that will enable them to progress rap- 
idly. 

DEGREE 

The School of Business and Administration grants 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration. This degree may be awarded 
to those who satisfy the entrance requirements 
and complete successfully the School's degree 
program. 

SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

Persons who have received a Bachelor's degree 
from an approved college or university may be 
eligible to enter the program for a second Bache- 
lor's degree in Business Administration. A second 
degree candidate must meet all requirements of 
the School's degree program. A minimum of 30 
credits must be completed in residency. 

THREE-YEAR BACHELOR'S/J.D. 

A student who has completed 90 credits with a 3.5 
or better overall average and who has satisfied all 
undergraduate curricular requirements may apply 
for the Bachelor's degree after successful comple- 
tion of the first year of academic work at 
Duquesne University School of Law. Students 
interested in this program should consult the 
advisement office in the sophomore year. 

BUREAU OF RESEARCH AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 

Activity complementing direct instruction takes 
place in four ancillary units grouped under the 
Bureau of Research and Community Services. All 
function to provide students and faculty with an 
opportunity for professional development as well 
as to provide services to the University and the 
community at large. 



65 



Bureau of Research 

The Research Bureau carries out an independent 
research program, and cooperates with divisions 
of the School in facilitating the research of individ- 
ual faculty members. 

Through the University Press, the Bureau issues 
monographs and other publications. From time to 
time contract research is undertaken for business, 
community, and governmental agencies, insofar as 
this may fall within its academic aims of discovery 
and dissemination of knowledge. 

The Bureau is a member of the Association for 
University Business and Economic Research, and 
maintains an interchange of publications with 
similar organizations in other universities 
throughout the country. 

Center for Administration of 
Legal Systems 

The Center serves as the focal point for research 
activity in the administration of law. It engages in 
cooperative projects with other centers, such as 
the center for Small Business Administration, 
where legal issues arise. 

Center for Economic Education 

The Center is charged with the responsibility of 
initiating and promoting economic education in 
the society at large. More specifically it develops 
and coordinates economic education within the 
Western Pennsylvania and Tri-State area where 
the primary thrust of the Center focuses on 
upgrading economic literacy and teaching compe- 
tency in the school system. The Center also con- 
ducts economic education programs for clergy, 
media professionals, and other opinion leaders. 

Center for International Management 

The objective of the Center is to develop a better 
understanding of the American involvement in 
international affairs and business and in manage- 
ment abroad through teaching and research; it is 
achieved by an interdisciplinary approach. 
The areas of current research focus are: 

1. Trade expansion between the USA and East- 
ern Europe. 

2. Management in foreign nations. 

3. Problems in international business. 

4. International economic development with a 
stress on interaction among developed countries, 
and on the relationship of developed and less 
developed countries. 

5. International political and legal issues. 

The Center has no teaching program of its own; 
most of its staff are faculty members from various 
schools and departments of the University or vis- 
iting foreign professors. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

These organizations, limited to students in the 
School of Business and Administration, exist for 



the promotion of the scholarly and professional 
interests of members: 

The Zeta Chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, 
national honorary fraternity for accredited schools 
of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of 
Business, is established at Duquesne University. 
Membership in this honorary fraternity is limited 
to juniors in the highest five per cent of their class 
and to seniors in the highest 10 per cent of their 
class. 

The Beta Alpha Phi Fraternity is the honorary 
scholarship society of the school. 

Phi Chi Theta is a national professional com- 
merce sorority. 

American Marketing Association, the student 
chapter, affords membership to students whose 
major interests include salesmanship, marketing, 
advertising, transportation, or foreign trade. A 
selected group of seniors is permitted, under 
faculty supervision, to participate in the meetings 
of the Sales Executives Club of Pittsburgh and the 
senior chapter of the A.M. A. 

Delta Sigma Pi, a national professional business 
fraternity, is represented by Theta Rho chapter. 

The Association for Personnel Administration is 
the student group sponsored by and affiliated with 
the American Society for Personnel Administra- 
tion. 

DIVISIONS AND PROGRAMS 

The School of Business and Administration is 
comprised of three Divisions: Quantitative Sci- 
ence: Behavioral Science; and Economic Science. 

Students entering the School of Business and 
Administration are expected to inform their advi- 
sors about their career objectives and their aca- 
demic areas of concentration, and to consult with 
them when choosing junior and senior courses 
indicated in any of the three Divisions. Their pro- 
posed curriculum choices must, of course, include 
the University requirements and Business and 
Administration Core requirements as indicated in 
the illustrations set forth in this catalog. Consis- 
tent with their stated career objectives and with 
the concurrence of their advisors, students, except 
those whose area of concentration is Accounting, 
are free to select any junior and senior courses 
from the School of Business and Administration 
curriculum to complete the required hours for 
graduation. Regulations for certification in 
Accounting make the program very rigid; this is 
dealt with in the paragraphs following the Sample 
Program. 

Students' concentrations should be based upon 
career objectives and constitute as broad and flexi- 
ble an educational process at the undergraduate 
level as is possible. Career advice should be sought 
from many and varied sources in the University, 
including faculty and Career Planning & Place- 
ment staff. 

Students registering for 300-400 level courses 
are presumed to have passed freshman and sopho- 
more required courses and have junior standing. 



66 



Elective courses are not necessarily offered each 
year. 



FOUR YEAR SAMPLE PROGRAM 



Freshman Year 



Fall Semester 
Courses Credits 



101 English Comp. . . 
109 College Algebra . . 
141 Economic Geo. . . 
*Non-Business elective 
Non-Business elective . 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Spring Semester 
Courses Credits 

102 English Comp 3 

1 1 1 Calculus 3 

142 Economic Devel. ... 3 

181 Intro, to Computers 3 

*Non-Business elective . . 3 

15 



*Course may be taken in either semester. 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Sping Semester 

Courses Credits Courses Credits 

21 1 Intro. Accounting I . . 3 212 Intro. Accounting II 3 

221 Prin. of Economics II . . 222 Prin. of Economics II 

3 3 

281 Probability & Stat. II . . 282 Probability & Stat. II . . 

3 3 

251 Legal Process 3 Non-Business elective ... 3 

Theology or Non-Business Non-Business elective ... 3 

elec 3 





15 




15 




Junior 


Year 




Fall Semester 




Sping Semester 




Courses Credits 


Courses 


Credits 


361 Prin. of Management 


3 
3 


332 Money & Banking 
321 or 322 Adv. Econ. 


. . 3 


371 Prin. of Marketing . 


. . 3 


331 Business Finance . . 


3 


Business elective . . . . 


. . 3 


322 Inter. Accounting or 




Business elective . . . . 


. . 3 


313 Managerial Acc't. . . 


3 


Non-Business elective . 


. . 3 


381 Decision Making . . 


3 









15 




15 




Senior 


Year 




Fall Semester 




Sping Semester 




Courses Credits 


Courses 


Credits 


Business elective 


3 


Business elective . . . . 


. . 3 


Business elective 


3 


Business elective . . . . 


. . 3 


Business elective 


3 


Business elective . . . . 


. . 3 


Non-Business elective . . 


3 


Non-Business elective . 


. . 3 


Non-Business elective . . 


3 


**Capstone course . . . 


. . 3 



15 
"Executive Action Simulation or Executive Policy. 



15 



The accounting faculty recommends that stu- 
dents concentrating in accounting take Accounting 
211, 212, 311, 312, 314, 315, 411, 412, 413, and 



251 -Legal Process, as well as at least one of the 
following: Law 353, 354, 355. It is recommended 
that the student achieve an overall B average in 
Accounting 211, 212 before attempting Account- 
ing 311 and a minimum grade of C in both 31 1 
and 312 before attempting the remaining 300 and 
400 level courses. 

Three credits in Theology are required for Cath- 
olic students. Others may take theology or may 
substitute three credits in the Departments of His- 
tory, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, or 
Sociology. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

ACADEMIC LOAD 

Students may normally carry five courses in one 
semester. A schedule of more than five courses or 
15 credits must be approved by the Dean. In tne 
summer sessions, students normally carry one 
credit a week; i.e., six credits in the six-week ses- 
sion. A 12-credit schedule in a regular semester is 
considered full-time study. Students on academic 
probation may not take more than 12 credits. 

EFFECTIVE CATALOG 

Degree requirements are those stipulated in the 
catalog of the year in which a student matriculates. 
The student is responsible for knowing the 
requirements for the degree. Requirements may be 
changed without notice or obligation. This catalog 
has been prepared on the best information avail- 
able as of May 1984. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Regular class attendance in the School of Business 
and Administration is normally required for maxi- 
mum educational advantage. The responsibility 
for all course material rests wholly with the stu- 
dent. It is the prerogative of each instructor to 
establish specific policies for attendance at tests, 
examinations, class lectures, deadlines for reports, 
and other specific school or course requirements. 
A student who is unable to attend class because 
of serious illness, hospitalization, a serious acci- 
dent or other extenuating circumstances is respon- 
sible for notifying the office of Academic Advise- 
ment. The student should supply a written 
verification as soon as possible. A student who is 
absent for cause is expected to complete all of the 
work in all courses. It is the student's responsibil- 
ity to make up all assignments in all courses and to 
be familiar with any instructions which may have 
been given during the absence. 

HANDICAPPED STUDENTS 

Handicapped students requiring special assistance 
are urged to notify the class instructor or the Aca- 
demic Advisement Office before the first class. 



67 



DIVISION OF QUANTITATIVE SCIENCE 
ACCOUNTING CURRICULUM 

CPA Requirements 

Students who desire to become certified public accountants in Pennsylvania and who have been graduated 
from a four-year program in a college approved by the State Board of Education may sit for the CPA 
examinations. The degree program of the University is so approved. 
Graduates may sit for the CPA examination in other states, among which are New Jersey and New York. 



avf 



211, 212. Introductory Accounting. 3 cr. each 

An introduction to the language of accounting, 
basic accounting concepts and brief exposure to 
recording financial information. An extensive 
study is made of accounting information for man- 
agement decisions. Offered every semester. 

311, 312. Intermediate Accounting. 3 cr. each 

This course is primarily concerned with an inves- 
tigation and analysis of the accounting problems 
and practices of the corporation, with detailed 
study of the component elements of the balance 
sheet and income statement. Basic topics are: 
accepted and alternative methods in the account- 
ing cycle; financial statements, their form, content 
and use; accounting problems of the corporation, 
detailed analysis of the balance sheet accounts, 
determination of net income; statement of source 
and uses of working capital. Prerequisites: 211, 

212. Offered every semester. 

313. Managerial Accounting. 3 cr. 

A study of the technique involved in the gathering, 
recording and interpretation of accounting and 
statistical data used in the solution of internal 
problems of management. Some of the topics cov- 
ered are: construction, analysis and interpretation 
of reports; establishment of production, operating 
and financial standards; measurement of manage- 
rial performance; use of budgets in managerial 
control; use of cost data and interpretation of cost 
reports; use of quantitative data in the formulation 
of policies; consideration of various aspects of 
Federal, State and local taxes and their effect on 
managerial decisions. Recommended for non- 
accounting students. Prerequisites: 211, 212. 
Offered every semester. 

314. Advanced Accounting. 3 cr. 

This course applies fundamental theory to a num- 
ber of important activities in business. Activities 
studied are: partnerships, special sales procedures, 
consolidations and fiduciaries. Prerequisite: 311. 
Offered every semester. 

315. Cost Accounting. 3 cr. 

Basic cost accounting procedures are discussed 
from the following view points: cost principle, cost 
determination; cost control; cost analysis. Topics 
reated include cost terminology, planning and 
:ontrol techniques, and development and applica- 
ion of overhead rates. Cost behavior patterns are 
studied in conjunction with development and 
ipplication of overhead rates. Standard costing, 
ob order costing, process costing, joint products 



and by-product costing are treated in detail. Meth- 
ods of judging managerial efficiency, inventory 
control and management control systems are also 
stressed. Prerequisites: 211, 212. Offered every 
semester. 

411. Auditing. 3 cr. 

Standards and procedures employed by auditors 
in the examination of financial statements for the 
purpose or rendering an opinion are studied and 
evaluated. Emphasis is placed on theory and phi- 
losophy of auditing; however, case problems are 
used to demonstrate the application of the princi- 
ples studied. Prerequisites: 312. Offered every 
semester. 

412. Introductory Income 

Tax Accounting. 3 cr. 

This course is a study of basic tax and procedure 
affecting primarily individuals and to a lesser 
extent partnerships and corporations. Principal 
topics: returns, rates, exemptions, income, deduc- 
tions, sales and exchange of assets, and credits. 
Emphasis is placed on problems to demonstrate 
the application of the principles studied and use is 
made of official forms for demonstration purposes. 
Prerequisites: either 311 or 313. Offered every 
semester. 

413. Business Information Systems. 3 cr. 

A course designed to introduce students to man- 
agement information processing systems and the 
transformation of information systems to meet 
specific types of informational requirements. Top- 
ics include data base concepts, file storage consid- 
erations, development methodology, design, 
implementation and management considerations 
of business data systems. The course presumes a 
familarity with basic computer programming and 
accounting 211, 212. Offered every semester. 

414. Corporate and Partnership 

Taxation 3 cr. 

This course will acquaint the student with the 
principles of tax law as they apply to corporations 
and their shareholders and to partnerships and 
their partners. Rather than emphasizing tax return 
preparation, the course's concentration is upon 
preparing students to make reasoned and sound 
judgments regarding the tax consequences of busi- 
ness transactions. Prerequisite: 412. Offered every 
spring. 

419. Seminar in Accounting. 3 cr. 

This course is designed to develop a student's abil- 
ity in technical expression, deepen his understand- 
ing of accounting theory, and acquaint him with 



68 



contemporary accounting problems and literature. 
Students are made acquainted with the philosophy 
and methodology of research, and required to pre- 
pare a research paper. Prerequisite: 314. Offered as 
needed. 



FINANCE CURRICULUM 

Students who desire to function in finance, either in the world of private business, government bodies, or in 
the area of securities are encouraged to select from the several groups of courses that place emphasis on 
specific material leading to that end. The professional designation of Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) is 
used by those in the securities industry. Suggested courses for students interested in this area are: 336, 337, 
433. The designation in the life insurance area for professional personnel is (CLU) or Chartered Life 
Underwriter, and CPCU for property and liability insurance. For students interested in careers in insurance, 
courses 334, 434, and 435 are recommended. 



331. Business Finance. 3 cr. 

The aim of this course is to combine the study of 
internal and external sources of funds with the 
tools of financial management in order to maxi- 
mize the wealth of the business entity. Primary 
attention is given to private business entities. 
While many of the tools and instruments used in 
the demonstrations are those of large business 
concerns, entities of all sizes are covered. Special 
attention is given to the decision-making process 
as applied to the finance function of business. Sec- 
ondary emphasis is given to the securities markets, 
financial projections, organizational form, mergers 
and consolidation, and reorganization. Prerequi- 
sites: Accounting 211, 212 or the equivalent. 
Offered every semester. 

332. Money and Banking. 3 cr. 

To develop knowledge about the role of financial 
institutions in our society as they perform their 
function of either the creation of the medium of 
exchange or of taking existing funds from sources 
of excess to sources of supply. Further, to develop 
an understnading of the construction of the portfo- 
lios of the institutions in order to understand why 
each employs their available funds as they do; 
knowledge about interest rate movements and 
their effects on business and the development of 
financial instruments used within the business 
society. Through a research paper, the student has 
the opportunity to develop a major area in detail. 
Emphasis is primarily on the role money and 
banking take in relationship to business entities. 
Offered every semester. 

333. Financial Management 3 cr. 

The course is designed to provide a theoretical or 
conceptual framework that a financial manager 
can use to reach decisions. Material is presented 
with the purpose of involving the student in the 
fundamental decisions and compromises of the 
financial manager as he faces choices between risk 
and return. Reading material, case material, com- 
puter analysis of financial problems and a research 
project are tools to be used. Prerequisite: 331. 
Offered every year. 



334. Risk Management. 3 cr. 

A study of the broad spectrum of risk exposures in 
business enterprise, with special attention to the 
need for identifying these in terms of nature and 
magnitude. Emphasis is on techniques available to 
aid the decision-maker in making decisions under 
constraints of uncertainty. Methods of alleviation, 
avoidance, and insurance are studied. Attention is 
given not only to the traditional forms of insurable 
hazards, but also to implicit risks such as those of 
loss in market value of assets, capital budgeting 
decisions, new product financing techniques, 
mergers, and other areas where risk is present in 
the decision. Prerequisite: 331. Offered every third 
semester. 

335. Business Financial Problems. 3 cr. 

The aim of this course is to provide a vehicle in 
which the student can take material from previous 
courses both of a financial nature and that from 
other disciplines and through its utilization solve 
problems primarily of a financial nature. It also 
provides the student with an opportunity to learn 
to write and deliver professional opinions on how 
to solve business problems. While the course is 
primarily taught through the case technique, other 
methods are also used. The student is expected to 
be able to identify problems, reach conclusions, 
recommend solutions, and identify techniques on 
how they might be implemented. Prerequisite: 
331. Offered every third semester. 

336. Security Analysis. 3 cr. 

An intensive study of the analytic techniques 
applicable to the selection of the various securities 
of private as well as public entities. Consideration 
is given to the markets in which these securities 
are traded and the types of information that are 
useful and necessary to the decision-making pro- 
cess of the investor as the attempt is made to mea- 
sure the value of a particular security. Several 
models are examined in seeking their appropriate- 
ness in establishing the relative worth of a secur- 
ity. The merits of both the fundamental and tech- 
nical approach to security analysis are considered 
for their contribution to the analysis of a security. 
Prerequisite: 331. Offered every year. 



337. Investment Analysis. 3 cr. 

It is the aim of this course to present material that 
will be useful to the student in developing an 
understanding of the various types of investments 
which may be available for a portfolio investment. 
Discussion of the various risks that a portfolio 
may be subject to and further the importance of 
the various risks to the various types of portfolio 
holders is undertaken. The basic elements of port- 
folio theory are presented. Various quantitative 
and descriptive approaches that are used in portfo- 
lio development are investigated. Techniques for 
measuring the effectiveness of the portfolio are 
illustrated. Prerequisites: 331, 336, or special per- 
mission of the instructor without 336. Offered 
every year. 

432. Credit Management. 3 cr. 

This course will be taught in such a manner so as 
to give to the student a thorough understanding of 
the function of credit management. In order that 
the student be afforded a maximum opportunity 
to grasp such information as presented in the liter- 
ature and in the classroom, cases, problems, and 
field experience may be assigned. Through these 
vehicles the student will have the opportunity to 
integrate the knowledge gained from text material 
and other financial sources with that of other disci- 
plines to arrive at a logical sound credit decision. 
Prerequisite: 331. Offered every third semester. 

433. Financial Markets 3 cr. 

An extensive and intensive study of the markets in 
which the financing of needs takes place. Study is 
made of the markets for borrowing and lending of 
capital, both short-term and long-term. Financial 
institutional structures are given emphasis as they 
act and interact when serving as sources or 
intermediaries and users of funds. Research by the 
student is required to afford the student the oppor- 
tunity to concentrate on an intensive effort upon 
an individual topic. Prerequisite: 331. Offered 
every third semester. 

434. Life Insurance. 3 cr. 

A study is made of the risks of death and longevity 
as they occur in personal and business situations. 
Analyses are made of various forms of life-insur- 
ance and annuity contracts and their uses, with 



69 



emphasis upon their functions as instruments of 
estate creation and administration. Uses of insur- 
ance in connection with partners and key men, 
and in connection with bank loans, are explored. 
Attention also is given to accident and health cov- 
erages, group plans, pensions, and regulation of 
the industry. Prerequisite: 331. Offered every third 
semester. 

435. Property and Liability Insurance. 3 cr. 

A study of business and personal applications of 
casualty, fire, and liability coverages in the form of 
both insurance and bonding, including the fields of 
workmen's compensation; landlords' and tenants' 
liabilities; burglary; robbery, and theft; automo- 
bile; credit and title insurance; fire and related 
lines; fidelity and surety bonding; and relevant 
aspects of inland and ocean marine. Prerequisite: 
331. Offered every third semester. 

437. Fundamentals of Real Estate. 3 cr. 

A study of the problems involved in financing resi- 
dential, commercial, and industrial real estate 
from the points of view of both owner and lender. 
Methods of financing covered include use of indi- 
vidual and business equity; loans secured by mort- 
gages; land contracts; sale-and-lease-back arrange- 
ments; and cooperatives, syndicates, and real- 
estate trusts. Attention is given to procedures for 
originating, servicing, and foreclosing loans and 
mortgage arrangements by principals, agents, and 
mortgage bankers. Case problems either in class or 
the field type are used to illustrate the techniques 
employed in determining the feasibility of a loca- 
tion. Special attention is given to an intensive 
research project in some area of interest to the 
student as related to real estate. Attention is also 
given to the requirements necessary to sit for the 
Pennsylvania Real Estate Sales License. Prerequi- 
site: 331. Offered every third semester. 

439. Seminar in Finance. 3 cr. 

Concentration upon selected contemporary topics 
presented by distinguished visiting professors of 
finance or resident faculty. Open only to senior 
students. Offered as needed. 



QUANTITATIVE METHODS CURRICULUM 

Students in the undergraduate School of Business and Administration complete a basic sequence in Quanti- 
tative Methods. This sequence is concerned with the application of mathematics, statistics, and electronic 
data processing to the analysis of business and economic problems. The objective of the program is to 
increase the student's knowledge and understanding of the uses of mathematics, statistics, and computers as 
aids in decision-making. The basic sequence is comprised of these courses: 181, 281, 282, and 381. Prior to 
entry into the sequence, Mathematics 109 and/or 1 1 1 in the College or the equivalent are required. 

In addition to the basic sequence, a number of electives are offered for students wishing to include 
quantitative management science techniques in their areas of concentration. 



70 



181. Introduction to Computers. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the basic concepts of computer 
programming in algebraic and representational 
languages. The course introduces the algorithmic 
approach to problem-solving and continues 
through the development of flowcharts and pro- 
grams, using BASIC or FORTRAN. Brief treat- 
ment is also given to other business related lan- 
guages. Prerequisite: Mathematics 109. Offered 
every semester. 

281, 282. Probability and Statistics. 3 cr. each 

This sequence includes the basic ideas of descrip- 
tive statistics, inductive statistics, and probability. 
Among the topics covered are: frequency distribu- 
tions: measures of central tendency; measures of 



dispersion; sets and set operations; elementary 
probability theory; probability distributions; sam- 
pling distributions; statistical estimation; testing of 
hypotheses; time series analysis; simple linear 
regression and correlation. Prerequisites: 181 and 
Mathematics 111. Offered every semester. 

381. Introduction to Decision Sciences. 3 cr. 

The application of the scientific method of prob- 
lem solving to business problems. The course 
includes various models and the methods of 
applying them to business situations. The models 
covered include linear programming, simulation, 
queuing, and inventory optimization. The use of 
library computer programs will be emphasized. 
Prerequisites: 281, 282. Offered every semester. 



MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS CURRICULUM 

The Quantitative Science Division offers an area of concentration in Management Information Systems to 
prepare students for career opportunities in business application programming, systems analysis and data 
processing management positions. The course work is designed to prepare students in solving complex 
problems within organizations with the assistance of computers and computer programs. For the area of 
concentration, completion of 382, 383, 481, 482, and 483 are required. In addition, three elective courses 
must be taken from the following: 384, 385, 386, 484, and 485. 



382. Data Processing with COBOL. 

Oriented towards data processing applications 
through COBOL. The scope of the course ranges 
from an introduction to data processing, data 
management, debugging and testing the programs 
to the introduction of file processing and report 
generation. Offered every year. 

383. File Processing. 

Deals with file processing in terms of its cost, 
capacity and responsiveness. The topics include: 
data structures, file accessing mechanism, sorting, 
merging, report writing and updating and manag- 
ing sequential and non-sequential files. One of the 
programming languages will be used for file pro- 
cessing. Offered every year. 

384. Advanced Programming. 

Structured programming is introduced. Emphasis 
is on a sequence of increasingly complex business 
applications in one of the computer languages. 
Arrays and concepts of files processing is 
presented. Offered as needed. 

385. Computer System. 

Designed to develop an understanding of the hard- 
ware components of a modern computing system 
and the components and functional characteristics 
of different types of operating systems. A basic 
understanding and appreciation of the internal 
operation of the computer system through assem- 
bler language will be developed. Offered as needed. 

386. Computer Simulation. 

Oriented to design and implement simulation 
model to study the behavior of the system, the 
validation of such models and their results for the 
purpose of decision making in management situa- 
tions. General purpose simulation models, finan- 
cial system models will be discussed with appro- 
priate computer language. Offered as needed. 



481. Systems Analysis and Design. 

An overview of all the phases of life cycle of the 
systems development with the emphasis on strate- 
gies and techniques of structured analysis and 
design to provide a framework for the managers to 
achieve their goals and objectives. Prerequisite: 
382. Offered as needed. 

482. Data Base Management Systems. 

The focus of the course is data base structure, pro- 
cessing and implementation. The topics are data 
base structure, query language, data base integrity, 
security, privacy and recovery capabilities. The 
hierarchical, net-work and relational approaches 
to data base systems with an overview of several 
commercially available data base management 
systems will be discussed. Prerequisite: 481. 
Offered as needed. 

483. Management Information Systems Project. 

Advanced coverage of strategies and techniques of 
a structured systems development project; design- 
ing of data base specifications. The project man- 
agement methods, project scheduling and control, 
formal presentations and group dynamics in the 
solution of Information Systems problems will be 
discussed. Students will work as a team to solve 
the project. Prerequisite: 482. Offered as needed. 

484. Distributed Data Processing. 

Designed to develop an understanding of the fea- 
tures of centralized, decentralized and distributed 
system with the emphasis on the impact of distrib- 
uted system on the business enterprise. Modes, 
data transmission and various devices required to 
implement distributed data processing system will 
be discussed. Offered as needed. 

485. EDP Audit and Control. 

This course will deal with the fundamentals of 
EDP audit and control process and the techniques 



71 



used in EDP audits. The particulars real-time, 
time-sharing systems and computer service 



bureaus will be discussed. The system approach to 
auditing will be used. Offered as needed. 



DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE 
PROGRAM GUIDE 

The present combination of required courses and free electives gives the student a solid foundation in 
business and, at the same time, allows him to follow his inclination in a special field of endeavor. At the 
same time, the greater the freedom of choice, the greater the need for helping the student in selecting courses 
in a meaningful way. 
Students should be aware that they can use this freedom either: 

1. To broaden their cultural background by expanding in many different fields of knowledge, or 

2. To establish, with the help of their advisor, a background of specialized knowledge in the field in which 
they have their strongest interest. 

Several Study Programs — combining a concentration in Business (24 credits) with a judicious choice of 
electives from the College (27 credits) — are given as illustrations of the flexibility and the depth possible 
under the present program. Presently Study Programs are offered in: 

Industrial Relations International Business 

Law Administration Marketing Management 

Production Public Administration 

Transportation and Traffic Environment and Ecology 

The listing of these Study Programs is only indicative, not inclusive; others may be structured, and the 
suggested areas can be modified according to the occupational objectives and preferences of the student. 



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 
CURRICULUM 

141. Physical and Economic Geography. 3 cr. 

This course examines the present and potential 
products of the world's major geographic regions. 
The course concerns itself essentially with man's 
utilization of natural resources in earning a living. 
Attention is given to the geographical foundations 
and operations of major industries including agri- 
culture, manufacturing, extractive activities, and 
transportation. Principal domestic and world 
trade movements are analyzed. Offered every 
semester. 

142. Economic Development of Europe 

and American. 3 cr. 

A survey of the evolution of Western economic 
institutions and business practices. The origin of 
capitalism, the Commercial and Industrial Revo- 
lutions, the rise of the bourgeoisie, and the spread 
of capitalism are examined. A study is also made 
of the institutional development and productive 
growth of the United States economy. Emphasis is 
placed on analyzing economic issues, particularly 
the evolution of business institutions, within a his- 
torical context. Offered every semester. 

441. International Business. 3 cr. 

A study of the techniques of international trade. 
Emphasis is given to the contract, overseas equip- 
ment, customs procedure in this country and 
aborad, marine insurance, packing for overseas 



trade, financing exports and import shipments, 
foreign exchange, and carriage of goods by air. Pre- 
requisites: 371, 221, 222. Offered every year. 

442. International Economics. 3 cr. 

This course is an introduction to international 
trade theory and the principles of international 
monetary economics as well as foreign trade poli- 
cies. Topics to be discussed include: the classical 
and neo-classical theory of comparative advan- 
tage, foreign exchange markets and balance of pay- 
ments, adjustment mechanisms, analysis of the 
consequences of trade regulation and international 
liquidity problems. Prerequisites: 221, 222. 
Offered every second year. 

454. The Law of International 

Commercial Transactions 3 cr. 

This course provides the student with an overall 
perspective of the basic legal problems involved in 
doing business with and in other countries. Topics 
covered include an introduction to foreign legal 
systems; study of various forms of business organ- 
ization a business person must consider before 
doing business with persons in another country; 
study of the basic legal issues surrounding a con- 
trol for the sale of goods; legal problems involved 
in letters of credit, insurance, risk of loss; antitrust 
aspects of the sale of goods; forms of dispute settle- 
ment; and the problems of enforcing judgments in 
and against foreign countries. Prerequisite: 251. 
Offered every second year. 



LAW ADMINSTRATION CURRICULUM 

This curriculum is designed to prepare professionals to aid in the solutions of one of society's most critical 
problems, that of the administration of legal systems. Future executives in court management, correctional 
institutions, and control systems (law enforcement) receive a broad interdisiplinary educational experience 
with the basic core coursework in the School of Business and Administration. 



72 



Other coursework may be apprpriate to fit a student's career objective. Counselors and school officers 
should be consulted. 

PRE-LEGAL CURRICULUM 

The curriculum of the School of Business and Administration meets the requirements for registration for 
general purposes of the State Board of Law Examiners in Pennsylvania, and of the State Education 
Department of New York. 

Coursework in the various areas of the School of Business and Administration provides good preparation 
for the professional study of law. 



251. Legal Process. 

An introductory course exploring the nature of 
law, its sources, its relation to society and govern- 
ment; relation of the judicial to the executive legis- 
lative functions; law as an instrument of social 
change and control; understanding of the legal 
rights and duties of persons. Acquaintance with 
areas of legal concern to the administrator such as 
labor, environmental controls, products liability, 
anti-trust concerns such as pricing and mergers. 
Offered every semester. 

353. Contracts. 3 cr. 

Study of the law pertaining to the formation of 
contracts, the legal requisites of an enforceable 
agreement, the transfer of contractual rights and 
duties, the discharge of contracts; the relationship 
between principal and agent. Prerequisite: 251. 
Offered every semester. 

354. Commercial Transactions. 3 cr. 

Study of the provisions of the Uniform Commer- 
cial Code with reference to the nature and legality 
of sales of goods, the formality of sale contract, 



transfer of title to goods, warranties; nature and 
kinds of commercial paper, requisites and mean- 
ing of negotiability methods of transfer. Prerequi- 
site: 251. Offered every semester. 

355. Law of Business Organizations. 3 cr. 

Consideration of the nature, creation and dissolu- 
tion of the proprietorship, various types of part- 
nerships, other unincorporated organizations, and 
the corporation. Duties, rights, remedies, and lia- 
bilities of owners and managers are studied. Pre- 
requisites: 251. Offered every semester. 

453. Administration of Legal Systems. 3 cr. 

Study of the legal system and the procedures by 
which legal rights and duties are effectuated and 
enforced; current problems and issues related to 
the system in the attainment of its objectives 
administrative problems in the legal system. Pre 
requisite: 251. Offered as need. 



: 



454. The Law of International 
Commercial Transactions. 

See International Business Curriculum. 



3cr. 



MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 

In accord with the objectives of the University and of the School, the Management Curriculum aims are: 

1. To acquaint students with managerial concepts and practices in both profit and non-profit organiza- 
tions. 

2. To offer an opportunity for some degree of specialization to those students who are interested in a study 
program in management. 



361. Principles of Management. 3 cr. 

This course represents an initial introduction to 
the essential principles of management centered 
around the concept of management being a basic 
process which is distinct and applicable to all 
enterprises. Planning, organizing, actuating, and 
controlling comprise the fundamental functions of 
management, making up the management process. 
These functions constitute the framework around 
which this course is built. Emphasis is given to 
planning which is rapidly growing in managerial 
importance. Decision making, managerial creativ- 
ity and the art of management are thoroughly 
developed. Offered every semester. 

362. Behavioral Science. 3 cr. 

This course is an introduction to the scientific 
study of behavior. It incorporates concepts from 
the disciplines of anthropology, psychology, soci- 
ology, economics, law, and political science, as 
well as from the newer fields of organization the- 
ory, game theory, and decision theory. This inter- 
disciplinary approach to behavior provides an 



integrative framework for transfer to any organiza- 
tional setting. Prerequisite: 361. Offered every 
year. 

363. Production Management. 3 cr. 

A follow up course to Principles of Management 
in which all important phases of management are 
developed. Topics such as purchasing, inventory 
control, motion and time study, plant layout, pric- 
ing, etc. are covered. Other related organizational 
problems are considered. An intermediate course 
to be used as a basis for further specialized treat- 
ment of management areas in the advanced 
courses. Prerequisites: 361 and 281, 282. Offered 
every second year. 

364. Personnel Management. 3 cr. 

A course presenting techniques of manpower man- 
agement. Involves study of recruiting and screen- 
ing techniques, training programs, merit rating, 
wage payment plans, safety, disciplinary program- 
ming, etc. Current practice is presented in the 
form of case material. Prerequisite: 361. Offered 
every semester. 



73 



365. Industrial Relations. 3 cr. 

A course developed to present to the student his- 
torical knowledge of the labor movement, current 
status and importance in industry, and the legal 
status of labor governing the actions of manage- 
ment in a myriad of ways. Presents the role of 
labor, management and government in collective 
bargaining and current industrial relations policies 
and practices. Prerequisites: 361. Offered every 
second year. 

461. Human Relations in Administration. 3 cr. 

An advanced course treating of the human aspect 
as it is encountered in the industrial organization. 
Involves an analysis of behavioristic patterns of 
individuals and as members of work groups. Deals 
with motivation, goals, needs, frustrations, etc. as 
they relate to the industrial situation. Prerequi- 
sites: Senior standing and 361. Offered every year. 

462i Public Administration. 3 cr. 

This course introduces the student to the content 
of public management and to the work of the pub- 
lic manager at federal, state and local government 
levels. It also compares and contrasts public and 
private management and links management the- 
ory and practice. Lecture-discussions and partici- 
pative methods are employed. Prerequisite: 361. 
Offered as needed. 

463. Collective Bargaining. 3 cr. 

Study of the relation of federal and state legislation 
to collective bargaining; analysis of substantive 
issues and administrative aspects of collective 
agreements; specific provisions including adjust- 
ment of grievances; conciliation, mediation and 
arbitration; collective bargaining and public pol- 
icy. Prerequisite: 361. Offered every second year. 

464. Administrative Organization. 3 cr. 

A course presenting organizational concepts as 
they relate to the operation of an enterprise. Line, 
staff, and functional relationships are thoroughly 
developed. Both formal and informal relation- 
ships are considered as they are developed and 
exist within a firm. Authority, responsibility, dele- 
gation, centralization and decentralization of con- 
trol and other related organizational problems are 
considered. Prerequisite: 361. Offered every year. 

465. Introduction to Entrepreneurial 

Small Business Management 3 cr. 

This course deals with the overall management of 
the small business enterprise. Coverage includes 
entering the small business arena, organizing and 
financing a business, operation of the small firm, 
growth planning, and problems associated with 
being small. Prerequisite: 361. Offered as needed. 



466. Wage and Salary Administration. 3 cr. 

An advanced course involving treatment of the 
major wage administration problems. Coverage 
will include such related and diverse facets of 
compensation as: analysis of the contemporary 
concepts of wage and salary administration, such 
as cost of living and merit rating; appraisal of vari- 
ous payment approaches, such as incentive pro- 
grams and profit sharing; structuring a wage pro- 
gram; analysis of the final effects such technically 
oriented practices have on the functional areas of 
management. Prerequisite: 361. Offered every 
year. 

491. Executive Action Simulation. 3 cr. 

A course incorporating the Games Theory 
Approach. The teaching techniques of Case 
Method and Role Playing are combined in a simu- 
lated business environment in which the students 
make the decisions affecting the conduct of a busi- 
ness. Participants are divided into teams with key 
corporate duties being assigned and several teams 
compete against each other in an attempt to oper- 
ate the "firm" on the optimum profitable basis. 
Prequisites: Senior standing and 361. Open only to 
students in the School of Business and Adminis- 
tration. Offered every semester. 

492. Executive Policy. 3 cr. 

Integrates concepts and skills from all functional 
areas of business and administration in decision 
making under conditions of uncertainty. Makes 
use of case histories and other information to 
allow students analysis and problem solving with 
the organization as a whole. Prerequisites: Senior 
standing and 361. Offered every semester. 

493. Independent Scholarly Study. 3 cr. 

Student must initiate an original research project 
in a field of business of his choice. The project is 
then scrutinized by a Committee of three Faculty 
members. If the project is approved, the Dean will 
choose a faculty member as director of the project. 
The project must be completed within an aca- 
demic semester. Prequisite: Student must qualify 
as a University Scholar. Offered every semester. 

494. Field Study. 3 cr. 

Organized group study under specific programs 
beyond the classroom. Participants will be 
required to utilize analytical and decision making 
abilities in projects in an action setting under 
faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Approval of the 
instructor. Offered every semester. 



MARKETING CURRICULUM 

In accord with the objectives of the University and of the School, the Marketing Curriculum aims are: 

1. To develop an understanding and appreciation of distribution in our economy. 

2. To explore the many basic activities involved in the marketing concept and in matching products to 
markets. 

3. To provide an area of specialized study for those students who wish to pursue the marketing phase of 
business. 



74 



371. Principles of Marketing. 3 cr. 

The emphasis throughout this course is on prob- 
lem solving and decision-making in marketing. 
The basis for the course is a systematic analysis of 
customer behavior, and the development of mar- 
keting policies and programs. Marketing strategy 
and designing a marketing mix are stessed to give 
the student an insight into these areas, and the 
reduction of risks is emphasized through the use of 
quantitative and qualitative market research tech- 
niques. Offered every semester. 

372. Marketing Problems. 3 cr. 

This course employs the case method illustrative 
of typical marketing problems such as merchan- 
dising, advertising, selection of channels of distri- 
bution, and development of new products. These 
problems are analyzed as they affect different mid- 
dlemen in the marketing structure including man- 
ufacturers, wholesalers, jobbers, brokers, agents, 
and similar functionaries. Theories of marketing 
are subjected to the test of practical examples so 
that the student may develop a more realistic 
grasp of the principles involved and the value of 
the practitioner's judgments. Current marketing 
developments are studied. Prerequisite: 371. 
Offered every semester. 

373. Sales Administration. 3 cr. 

An introduction to the fundamentals of salesman- 
ship and the problems confronted by the sales 
manager. Topics include such areas as: production 
planning, pricing, packaging, qualitative and 
quantitative market analysis, and specific sales 
management functions of selection, training, 
equipping, compensating, supervising, and con- 
trolling salesmen. Prerequisite: 371. Offered every 
spring. 



441. International Business. 

See International Business Curriculum. 



3 cr. 



471. Marketing Research 3 cr. 

This course examines the means and methods bus- 
iness management uses to get the necessary infor- 
mation for decision making involving what to pro- 
duce, how much to produce, and how to distribute 
* goods that are produced. The various types of 
marketing research — consumer research, motiva- 
tional research, market analysis, sales analysis and 
sales forecasting, product research, and advertising 
research — are studied in some detail. Prerequisite: 
371. Offered every year. 

472. Transportation. 3 cr. 

A comprehensive analysis of the historical evolu- 
tion, operation and economic development of the 
railroads, motor carriers, water carriers and air 
carriers of the United States. The Interstate Com- 
merce Act, with its amendments and the public 
regulation, state and federal, of the various carriers 
will be emphasized. Prerequisites: 371, 221, 222. 
Offered every year. 



473. Traffic Management. 3 cr. 

This course deals with the physical distribution of 
goods. Topics treated are: location analysis, inven- 
tory control, the total distribution cost concept, 
government regulations and current legislation 
related to physical distribution. There is also cov- 
erage of the organization and functioning of traffic 
departments, shippers' relations with carriers, and 
related issues. Prerequisites: 371, 221, 222. Offered 
every year. 

474. Purchasing Management. 3 cr. 

Introduction to purchasing and materials manage- 
ment. Topics covered include purchasing effi- 
ciency, inventory problems, pricing and time 
issues, quality, and value analysis. Students will 
prepare written case analyses as well as a term 
project involving value analysis. Prerequisites: 361 
and 371. Offered every year. 

DIVISION OF ECONOMIC 

SCIENCE 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE CURRICULUM 

121. Elements of Economics. 3 cr. 

Economics 121 is an introductory course in eco- 
nomics intended to afford an understanding of 
how our economic system works, of the forces 
which affect the level, composition, and distribu- 
tion of the output of the economy, and of the 
issues behind current economic problems. The 
course content will define concepts, provide back- 
ground materials, and develop economic ideas 
necessary to an understanding of the policy issues 
constantly before a complex dynamic economy. 
Not counted toward a degree in the School of Bus- 
iness and Administration. Offered every year. 

221. Principles of Economics 1. 3 cr. 

The first course in economics for the student who 
plans to major or minor in economics. The course 
seeks to acquaint the student with concepts and 
the logical basis to economic reasoning. Emphasis 
is placed on understanding the behavior of house- | 
holds and firms under competitive and imper- 
fectly competitive market conditions. Offered 
every semester. 

222. Principles of Economics II. 3 cr. 

This course is primarily concerned with aggrega- 
tive economic relationships. The theory of the 
determination of national income is developed 
and attention is given to the construction of 
national income accounts. Attention is given to 
monetary and fiscal policy and their implications. 
Prerequisite: 221. Offered every semester. 

321. National Income Analysis. 3 cr. 

A conceptual analysis of national income theory, 
its tools, its basic principles and its social and eco- 
nomic signficance. The course treats the 
macroeconomic method of economic analysis. It 
is concerned with explaining the development and 
nature of national income aggregates. The basic 



75 



principles of national income theory are devel- 
oped and explained in order to place into focus the 
operations of the American economy and the 
many problems relating to it. Prerequisites: 221, 
222. Offered every semester. 

322. Price and Production Economics. 3 cr. 

An intensive study of the theory of demand, pro- 
duction and distribution. In addition, recent 
developments in the theory of imperfect competi- 
tion and oligopoly are carefully examined. Prereq- 
uisites: 221, 222. Offered every semester. 

323. Public Finance. 3 cr. 

A study of the organization and management of 
government revenues and expenditures with 
emphasis on American practices and policies at 
the various levels of government. Benefit-cost and 
cost-effectiveness analysis with their implications 
for program and capital budgeting receive heavy 
consideration. The economic consequences of 
various tax structures and alternative social choice 
mechanisims are studied. Prerequisite: 321 or 322. 
Offered every year. 

324. Comparative Economic Systems. 3 cr. 

A comparative study of capitalism, socialism, 
communism and other economic systems with 
emphasis on analysis rather than mere description 
of the economics of various countries. Prerequi- 
sites: 221, 222. Offered every year. 

420. Labor Economics. 3 cr. 

Analysis of the principles for wage and employ- 
ment determination in contemporary American 
economy under non-union conditions as well as 
under collective bargaining. The institutional 
development underlying labor supply and demand 
is studied with direct emphasis on its impact on 
employment and production, on the general wage- 
level and on wage differentials, on the distribution 
of national income and on general social welfare. 
The course also includes a comparative study of 
problems in labor economics in American and 
other democratic countries. Prerequisites: 221, 
222. Offered as needed. 

421. History of Economic Thought. 3 cr. 

Shows the development of economic thought from 
the Age of Mercantilism to 1890. Major emphasis 
is placed upon the writings of Mun, Petty, Ques- 
nay, Smith, Ricardo, Malthus, Marx, Jevons, and 
the Austrian School. It offers a study of the funda- 
mental concepts of the writers and the influence of 
instutional conditions upon their philosophy. 
Major emphasis is placed upon value and distribu- 
tion theory as it developed. Prerequisites: 221, 
222. Offered every year. 

423. Business Cycles and Forecasting. 3 cr. 

This course is designed to study the process of 
economic change. Analyses of Seasonal, Cyclical, 
and Secular movements will be undertaken. Theo- 
retical and empirical aspects will be covered. Fore- 
casting techniques will also be studied. Prerequi- 
sites: 221, 222. Offered every year. 



424. Business and Public Policy. 3 cr. 

A study of the regulatory techniques used by gov- 
ernment to influence and modify business behav- 
ior. This course also includes an analysis of mar- 
ket structure, conduct and performance 
considerations pertaining to the firm and the 
industry. Emphasis is given the anti-trust laws and 
special regulatory problems. Prerequisites: 221, 
222. Offered every year. 

425. Current Economic Issues. 3 cr. 

A seminar-like discussion of the state of the 
nation's economy and its current problems on the 
basis of critical examination of professional jour- 
nal articles and economic reports by official and 
private sources (such as the President's Council of 
Economic Advisers). The purpose of the course is 
to begin developing in the graduating senior the 
ability to coordinate and apply the analytical 
knowledge he has acquired during his undergradu- 
ate study of economics and related fields of social 
science and business administration. Prerequi- 
sites: 221, 222. Offered every year. 

426. Monetary Theory and Policy. 3 cr. 

This course presents the chief theoretical contribu- 
tions on money. The policy implications of these 
theories, past and present, will be emphasized. 
Concentration will center upon policy proposals 
and controversy in the monetary field since Word 
War II. The theories and contributions of Hicks, 
Keynes, Friedman and Tobin, among others, are 
reviewed. The role of interest rate is reviewed 
along with wage-price controversies, international 
gold flows, and the relationships between fiscal 
and monetary policies. Prerequisites: 22 J, 222. 
Offered every year. 

427. Theory of Economic Development 3 cr. 

The course is designed to acquaint students with 
the area of economic development. The subject 
matter of this course conveniently divides itself 
into five major categories: the nature of develop- 
ment and problems of measurement, theories of 
development; factors and forces affecting eco- 
nomic growth; different approaches to a higher 
standard of living; and problems of domestic and 
international stability. Approach to this course 
encompasses detailed study as well as a strong 
emphasis on theoretical and critical analysis. Pre- 
requisites: 221, 222. Offered as needed. 

429. Seminar in Economics. 3 cr. 

The purpose of the seminar is to provide a vehicle 
for the advanced student to investigate separate 
subject areas in the field of Economic Theory. The 
inention is to provide a sound basis for further 
study at the graduate level. Seminar procedure will 
stress written and oral reports. Prerequisites: 321, 
322 and permission of the instructor. Offered as 
needed. 



442. International Economics. 

See International Business Curriculum. 



3 cr. 



76 



School of Education 



HISTORY 

Prior to 1929, teacher preparation courses were 
offered through a department of the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences; in that year the newly- 
organized School of Education granted its first 
degrees in programs of secondary education. The 
following programs have since been approved for 
certification by the Department of Education of 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; music edu- 
cation in 1930; graduate education, 1936, elemen- 
tary education, 1937; guidance, 1952; school 
administration, 1952; special education, 1964; 
reading specialist and reading supervisor, 1969; 
school psychology, 1969; early childhood educa- 
tion, 1975; school supervision, 1976. 

SELECTION AND ADMISSION 

Candidates who express a desire to become teach- 
ers are admitted to the School of Education 
through the University Office of Admissions 
(apply to Director of Admissions, Duquesne Uni- 
versity, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15282). The curriculum for 
the first two years is devoted to the broad learnings 
in general and basic professional education and 
beginning course work in a major discipline or 
area of concentration. 

The School of Education includes and main- 
tains in its enrollment only those students who 
give definite indications of teacher potential. Stu- 
dents are, therefore, expected to demonstrate 
developing personal and professional characteris- 
tics, attitudes, and competencies which will rec- 
ommend them as worthy candidates for the teach- 
ing profession. Evaluation and approval by the 
faculty is based on the student's development of: 

1. A well-balanced personality as evidenced 
through personal appearance, health and vitality, 
emotional maturity, verbal fluency, self-confi- 
dence, cooperation, judgement and tact, adaptabil- 
ity and resourcefulness, cultural appreciation, and , 
social relationships. 

2. Professional attitudes and competencies as 
evidenced through interest in teaching, prepara- 
tion in subject matter and in teaching methods 
and techniques, participation in laboratory experi- 
ences, including observation and student teaching, 
and the demonstration of necessary abilities and 
skills. 

PROGRAMS 

The School of Education has program approval 
from the Pennsylvania Department of Education 
for the preparation of Elementary, Secondary, and 
Special (teaching the mentally and/or physically 
handicapped) Education teachers. Also, in consor- 
tium with Carlow College, students can become 
certified in Early Childhood Education. 



The programs, in accord with the philosophy 
and objectives of the School of Education, offer 
students opportunity to qualify for: 

1. The Instructional I (Provisional) Certificate 
to teach classes in the schools of Pennsylvania for 
a period of six years. 

2. Admission to graduate programs in educa- 
tion. 

The last 30 credits for the degree must be earned 
at Duquesne University. The minimum number 
of credits for graduation is 120. 

DEGREE 

The School of Education offers programs leading 
to the Bachelor of Science in Education degree. All 
programs are approved by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education for the Instructional I 
(Provisional) Certificate. 

CURRICULUM 

General Education. The School of Education 
requires completion of the established general edu- 
cation which includes courses in the humanities, 
social sciences, natural and behavioral sciences, 
and, for Catholic students, theology. 

Professional Education. The basic professional 
education program introduces the student to the 
teaching profession through thorough study of the 
principles and practices of education and the 
learning process. Specialized courses provide prep- 
aration in teaching techniques and methods 
required for specific fields of concentration — ele- 
mentary, secondary, special (mentally and/or 
physically handicapped), or early childhood 
education. 

Professional Laboratory Experiences. The School 
has developed broad and diversified professional 
laboratory experiences designed to provide oppor- 
tunities for observing and working with children 
and youth; these include: 

1. Programs in neighborhood and community 
centers, hospitals, recreational and youth organi- 
zations, and summer camps. 

2. Planned observations in public and private 
schools, agencies, institutions and educational 
settings. 

3. Teacher aide and tutorial experiences. 

4. Student teaching in an approved setting for an 
entire semester. 

All of these experiences are completed under 
professional supervision from the University and 
from the public or private school or off-campus 
agency. 



77 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

The following courses in the arts and sciences are 
an integral part of each program: 

Credits 

Required Courses 42 

English Area 12 

English Composition 6 

English Elective 3 

Communication Area (Speech, 

Journalism, English) 3 

Any Combination of Mathematics/ 

Science/Foreign Language 12 

Social Science 12 

(Anthropology, Economics, Geography, 

History, Political Science, Sociology, and 

Psychology) 
Philosophy/Theology 6 

Catholics-minimum of 3 Theology credits. 

COMPETENCY CORE CURRICULUM 

The Competency Core Curriculum consists of 27 
credits beginning with Introduction to Education 
in the freshman year, Developmental Foundations 
I, II in the sophomore year and concluding with 
Curriculum and Instruction I, II in the junior year. 
The Competency Core Curriculum focuses on the 
philosophical, psychological and pedagogical foun- 
dations needed by entry-level teachers; extensive 
involvement in field experiences beginning with 
the freshman year; and an on-going process of 
individual advisement and counseling regarding 
teaching and career decisions. 

The Competency Core Curriculum is predicated 
on four domains: 1) Becoming a person, 2) 
Becoming a student of education, 3) Becoming an 
educational theorist, and 4) Becoming a practi- 
tioner. The Competency Core Curriculum, as the 
title implies, is a competency based program that 
is developmentally designed to prepare education 
students to be entry-level teachers in elementary, 
secondary and special education. 

Courses (Required in all programs)* 27 

101 Introduction to Education 3 

215, 216 Developmental Foundations of 

Education I 4 

217, 218 Developmental Foundations of 

Education II 4 

*315, 316 Curriculum and Instruction I .... 8 
*317, 318 Curriculum and Instruction II . ... 8 

*In Early Childhood Education, 315, 316 and 
317, 318 are not required. 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

This is a cooperative program, approved by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education, with Car- 
low College. Some of the professional courses are 
offered only on the Carlow campus. 

These 47 credits (semester hours), in addition to 
42 specified under Gerneral Education, 1 1 credits 
in the Competency Core Curriculum, and 20 cred- 
its in electives, are required for the degree: 



Credits 

Required courses — Carlow College 32 

*201 Orientation to Early Childhood 

Education 3 

*203 Child Development 3 

307 Curriculum & Methods for Early Child- 
hood Education with Practicum 4 

308 Curriculum & Methods for Day 

Care with Practicum 3 

310 Specialized Programming For 

Young Children 3 

**320 ED Reading & Language Arts 3 

321 ED Reading & Language Arts 

Practicum 1 

404 EC Nursery School Student 

Teaching & Seminar 6 

406 EC Primary Student Teaching & 

Seminar 6 

♦Prerequisites for 307, 308 and 310. 
"""Prerequisite for 321. 

Required courses — Duquesne University .... 15 

273 Art, Music, and Physical Education 

for Classroom Teachers 3 

274 Art, Music, and Physical Education 

for Classroom Teachers 3 

331 Teaching Elementary Social Studies .... 3 

332 Teaching Elementary Mathematics 3 

333 Teaching Elementary Science 3 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

The following 39 credits (semester hours) in Pro- 
fessional Preparation and 12 in electives com- 
bined with the 42 credits specified in General Edu- 
cation and 27 in the Competency Core 
Curriculum comprise this curriculum: 

Credits 
Professional Preparation 

(All Courses Required) 39 

273, 274. Art, Music, and Physical 
Education for the Classroom Teacher .... 6 

325 Teaching Reading in the 

Primary School 3 

326 Teaching Reading in Intermediate and 
Middle Schools 3 

330 Teaching Elementary Language 

Arts and Reading 3 

331 Teaching Elementary Social 

Studies 3 

332 Teaching Elementary Mathematics 3 

333 Teaching Elementary Science 3 

484 Children's Literature 3 

♦491 Stu dent Teaching 12 

*No student may register for additional course 

work during the student teaching semester without 

permission. 

Electives 12 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

General and professional course work and profes- 
sional education courses required for this program 
are outlined in the School of Music section. 



78 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

In addition to the 42 credits (semester hours) in 
General Education and 27 in the Competency 
Core Curriculum, a student must complete the fol- 
lowing 51 credits,: 18 in Professional Preparation, 
three in Electives, and a minimum of 30 in an arts 
or sciences Area to satisfy requirements for the 
degree and certification: 

Credits 
Professional Preparation 
(All Courses Required) 18 

497 Reading in the Secondary School 3 

Specific Methods Course 3 

215 Teaching Grammar and 

Composition OR 

316 Teaching Secondary Mathematics 

and Science OR 

318 Teaching Secondary Foreign 
Languages OR 

319 Teaching Secondary Social Studies 

*491 Student Teaching 12 

*No student may register for additional course 
work during the student teaching semester without 
permission. 

Electives 3 

Arts or Sciences Area (Minimum for 
certification) 30 

Certification Area Course Supporting Courses 

Concentration 
Biology Biology Mathematics, 

chemistry, and 
physics 
Chemistry Chemistry Mathematics and 

physics 
Communication 

English Emphasis English Journalism, Speech 

Journalism 

Emphasis Journalism Speech, English 

Speech Emphasis Speech English, journalism 

General Science Minimum of eight 

credits in biology, 
chemistry, and 
physics, and addi- 
tional courses to 
total a minimum of 
18 semester hours 
in one field of 
science 
Latin Latin Greek, history 

Mathematics Mathematics Computer science 

general analytical 
physics 
Modern Languages French, German, Philosophy, 

or Spanish linguistics 

Physics Physics Chemistry, math- 

ematics, computer 
science, biology 
Social Studies Economics, geog- Philosophy 

raphy, history, pol- 
itical science, psy- 
chology, sociology, 
anthropology 



SPECIAL EDUCATION (MENTALLY AND/ 
OR PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED) 

This program is designed to prepare students for 
teaching mentally and/or physically handicapped 
pupils, including brain injured, emotionally and 
socially disturbed, learning disabled. 

These 48 credits (semester hours) in Profes- 
sional Preparation and three in Electives in addi- 
tion to the 42 credits in General Education and the 
27 in the Competency Core Curriculum are 
required for the degree: 

Credits 
Professional Preparation 
(All Courses Required) 48 

209 Foundations of Special Education 3 

273, 274. Art, Music, and Physical 
Education for the Classroom Teacher .... 6 

276 Methods in Special Education I 3 

325 Teaching Reading in the 
Primary School 3 

330 Teaching Elementary Language 
Arts and Reading 3 

332 Teaching Elementary Mathematics 3 

333 Teaching Elementary Science 3 

386 Teaching the Mildly Handicapped 3 

387 Teaching the Severely 

Handicapped 3 

388 Vocational Education for the 
Handicapped 3 

477 Methods in Special Education II 3 

*491 Student Teaching-Special 

Education 12 

Electives 3 

*No student may register for additional course 
work during the student teaching semester without 
permission. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Through completion of degree and certification 
program requirements, a student will be eligible 
for the appropriate Pennsylvania Instructional I 
(Provisional) Certificate. This certificate is valid 
for six years of teaching. During that time, to con- 
vert the certificate to the Instructional II (Perma- 
nent) form, the holder must complete 24 semester 
hours of post baccalaureate study and three years 
of successful teaching in public or private schools 
in Pennsylvania. All programs are approved by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education. Certifica- 
tion in Pennsylvania enables a student to meet 
certification requirements in various other states. 
Application for the certificate must be made dur- 
ing the semester in which the student expects to be 
graduated. 

DUAL CERTIFICATION 

Through advisement, a student may complete 
requirements in two certification areas, such as 
elementary/early childhood, elementary/secon- 
dary, elementary/special education. Such pro- 
grams require some additional coursework beyond 



79 



the 120 semester hours for a degree. After com- 
pleting all other requirements, students may regis- 
ter, with appropriate advisement, for a nine- and a 
six-credit student-teaching course. Student teach- 
ing in both areas is offered during the student's 
final semester. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

The School of Education faculty has determined 
that the following policy will be in effect for the 
School of Education and will be adhered to by all 
professors who teach undergraduate courses: It is 
presumed that each student in a professional 
course will normally attend every session. The 
maximum number of cuts permitted is equated in 
credit hours, not in periods the class meets; in 
other words, a student may miss three hours of 
class time in a three-credit course. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The School of Education includes in its program 
opportunities for participation in student organi- 
zations related to professional education prepara- 
tion. Students are encouraged to take an active 
part in these professional organizations, for such 
interest is interpreted as reflecting social and edu- 
cational development. The organizations are: 

Duquesne University Chapter of the Council for 
Exceptional Children, state and national student 
organizations in Special Education. 

Kappa Delta Epsilon, national education sorority. 

Kappa Phi Kappa, national education fraternity. 

HONOR AWARDS 

These awards, presented at the annual Honors 
Days Convocation, are open to undergraduates in 
the School of Education: 

Faculty Award for General Excellence in Early 
Childhood Education. 

Faculty Award for General Excellence in Elemen- 
tary Education. 

Faculty A ward for General Excellence in Secon- 
dary Education. 

Faculty Award for General Excellence in Special 
Education. 

Kappa Delta Epsilon National Professional Educa- 
tion Sorority Award for outstanding member of 
Alpha Kappa Chapter. 

Kappa Delta Epsilon National Professional Educa- 
tion Sorority President's Award. 

Kappa Phi Kappa National Professional Education 
Fraternity ward for outstanding member of Beta 
Phi Chapter. 

Lawrence A. Roche Memorial Award to a junior 
student for general excellence in the School of 
Education. 

Philip C Niehaus Memorial Award for outstand- 
ing achievement in the School of Education. 
Council for Exceptional Children Award for out- 
standing work in the organization. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS AND 
PSYCHOLOGY 

101. Introduction to Education. 3 cr. 

An overview of professional education programs 
and careers; introduces students to the compe- 
tency based format of indergraduate curriculums 
and gives them opportunities to meet faculty and 
staff in informal information-giving and counsel- 
ing relationships. 

201. Child Development. 3 cr. 

Behavior and personality characteristics of chil- 
dren from birth to adolescence as they relate to 
school and home situations. 

202. Educational Psychology. 3 cr. 

Examines affective and cognitive development, 
planning and teaching techniques, measurement 
and evaluation, and related theories in an experi- 
ential learning environment. 

203. 204, 205, 206, 207. 

Field Experience. 1 cr. each 

Classroom and other school experience as an aide 
or observer. Enrollment with consent of the Direc- 
tor of Student Teaching or a School of Education 
faculty advisor; one credit each semester for a 
maximum of five semesters. 

215, 216. Developmental Foundations 

of Education I. 4 cr. 

See description for 217, 218. 

217, 218. Developmental Foundations 

of Education II. 4 cr. 

Developmental Foundations I and II examine and 
provide for demonstration of various generic com- 
petencies in the areas of physical, cognitive, affec- 
tive and social development of the individual 
from birth until late adolescence. The components 
examine the effects that values, classroom interac- 
tions, approaches to various teaching and learning 
styles, recognition of individual differences, and 
various curriculum designs including I.E.P.'s and 
multi-cultural approaches, have on the physical, 
cognitive, affective and social development of all 
students and the teacher. These components pro- 
vide for the demonstration of competency in the 
understanding, the analysis and the managing of 
these effects. Concurrent with these components is 
a field placement that requires case studies, 
directed observations, data collection and teacher 
aide experience. 

301. Foundations of Education. 3 cr. 

Introduction to the study of the philosophical, 
social, and historical foundations of education and 
the relationships between the school and other 
institutions of society. 

315, 316. Curriculum and Instruction I. 8 cr. 

See description for 317, 318. 

317, 318. Curriculum and Instruction II. 8 cr. 

Curriculum and Instruction I and II focus on the 
presentation, analysis and demonstration of those 



80 



generic competencies that directly apply to the 
design and implementation of effective teaching- 
learning practices in the classroom. The compo- 
nents specifically address such topics and tech- 
niques as educational taxonomies, instructional 
objectives, planning the lesson, classroom man- 
agement, learning centers, materials utilization, 
evaluation of learning and grading. These compo- 
nents also include a concurrent field placement 
that continues the directed observations and data 
collection initiated in the Developmental Founda- 
tions components and introduces the student to 
the evaluation of the teaching-learning situations 
observed and to the self-evaluation process of his/ 
her own development in the four domains of the 
Competency Core Curriculum. The field place- 
ment for these final components includes teaching 
experience in an actual classroom. 

340. Self-Development for the 

Classroom. 3 cr. 

Focuses on a philosophical-psychological 
approach to self-development, using classroom 
activities to promote personal awareness in the 
teacher and student. 

351. Adolescent Development. 3 cr. 

Examines the developmental processes, psycho- 
logical, physical, and social, which affect student 
and student-teacher behavior and relationships in 
the classroom. 

410. Interpersonal Management Techniques 

for Educational and Organizational 

Leaders. 3 cr. 

Focuses on four major concerns for maximizing 
learning and minimizing conflict; they are the 
teacher's personal awareness of feelings and emo- 
tions; interpersonal, societal, and educational val- 
ues; understanding of group dynamics; and knowl- 
edge of managing classroom situations. 

480. Independent Study. 1-2 cr. 

With permission of an instructor and approval of 
the Dean, seniors may pursue in-depth study of a 
subject area or engage in individual projects 
related to their professional goals. 

481. Learning Resources. 3 cr. 

Identification, location, utilization, and creation of 
learning materials; adaptation of print and non- 
print materials to meet curricular needs; develop- 
ing materials for individualized classroom instruc- 
tion. 

485. Problems in Teaching Reading. 3 cr. 

Reading difficulties in elementary and secondary 
school levels; discussion of classroom and clinical 
procedures in solving reading problems; diagnos- 
tic and corrective techniques, and materials for the 
classroom teacher; reading improvement pro- 
grams; special unit on reading problems of the 
mentally retarded. 



499. School Law and the Pupil. 2 cr. 

School law as it affects the child — census, admis- 
sion practices, vaccination, compulsory attend- 
ance; the neglected, dependent, and delinquent 
child; work periods, graduation requirements, spe- 
cial school services, and other regulations pertain- 
ing to the health and welfare of the child. 

Early Childhood Education 

201. Orientation to Early Childhood 

Education. 3 cr. 

Examination of the history of child development 
and practices of early education, culminating in an 
overview of theoretical issues influencing practice 
in the field today. Development of the student's 
observational skills, completion of on-site obser- 
vations in early educational settings, defining the 
role of the Early Childhood Educator, and devel- 
oping a personal philosophy. (Fall semester only) 

203. Child Development. 3 cr. 

In-depth examination of the development of the 
child from birth-eight years in physical, intellec- 
tual, social and emotional areas of growth. Meth- 
ods of recording and assessing growth of young 
children will be examined and utilized and a term 
project based on readings and observations will be 
required. (Spring semester only) 

307. Curriculum and Methods for Early 
Childhood Education with Practicum. 4 cr. 

Study of curriculum methodology and implemen- 
tation in nursery, kindergarten and primary set- 
tings. Students will design environments and enact 
activities for language development and reading, 
art, music, play, social studies, science and math 
for children 3-8 years. A weekly practicum in an 
early education classroom is an integral part of 
this course. Prerequisite: EC 201 and 203. (Fall 
semester only) 

308. Curriculum and Methods for 

Day Care With Practicum. 3 cr. 

Examination of social needs, program designs and 
curriculum implementation of day care services 
for children birth-8 years. Topics covered include 
research on working families, program design, 
environmental design and assessment, compre- 
hensive curriculum planning, staffing strategies, 
parent communication, and research on impact of 
day care on young children and their families. 
Weekly practicum required in a child care class- 
room. Prerequisite: EC 201 and 203. (Spring 
semester only) 

310. Specialized Programming for 

Young Children. 3 cr. 

Examination of history and current status of pro- 
grams which provide compensatory, remedial, 
therapeutic or early interventive experience to 
young children. Curriculum design and implemen- 
tation will be examined along with specific respon- 
sibilities of the early educator for mainstreaming, 
teaming and working in liaison with other profes- 
sionals. Weekly practicum required in specialized 



setting. Prerequisitie: EC 201 and 203. (Fall semes- 
ter only) 

320. Reading and Language Arts. 3 cr. 

The nature of reading, the pertinent research in 
the field, the selection of materials, methodologies 
and teaching strategies are emphasized. (Fall 
semester only) 

321. Reading and Language 

Arts Practicum. 1 cr. 

Diagnosis of needs, planning and teaching of age 
and need appropriate lessons to small groups of 
children in a supervised situation. Prerequisite ED 
320. (Spring semester only) 



404. Nursery School Student 
Teaching and Seminar 



6 cr. 



406. Primary Student Teaching 

and Seminar. 6 cr. 

The student teaching experience involves the pro- 
spective teacher in a Nursery School setting and in 
a primary classroom for eight weeks each; she 
assumes teaching responsibilities, applies theory/ 
practice and develops her own teaching style 
under the direct supervision of the cooperating 
teacher and college supervisor. Verification of stu- 
dent competency will be determined jointly by 
both the cooperating teacher and the college super- 
visor. Student teachers return to campus one after- 
noon a week for seminar with the college instruc- 
tor. This seminar provides classroom discussion 
of various student teaching experiences as well as 
analysis of the goals, program designs and curric- 
ula of the various early childhood programs in 
which students teaching is completed. Pertinent 
topics related to ongoing professional develop- 
ment will be included. No other credits may be 
taken while the student is involved in 404 and 406 
without special permission of the Director of Early 
Childhood Education. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

273, 274. Art, Music, and Physical Education 
for the Classroom Teacher. 3 cr. each 

An introduction to the basic principles and con- 
cepts of teaching visual arts, physical education, 
health, and music to children of elementary school 
age, including exceptional children. 

325. Teaching Reading in the 

Primary School. 3 cr. 

Major emphasis is on the pre-school, readiness, 
and primary grades. Content deals with language, 
experiential, cognitive, and perceptual develop- 
ment in young children and their relationship to 
the beginning reading program. In addition, con- 
sideration will be given to the basic reading skills 
which comprise the first three years of a develop- 
mental reading program; techniques of individual- 
izing instruction, evaluating and reporting pupil 
progress. 



81 



326. Teaching Reading in Intermediate 

and Middle Schools. 3 cr. 

Focuses on the transitional period in a develop- 
mental reading program in which reading becomes 
a tool to be used in each content area. In addition 
to continuing reading skills in the developmental 
reading program, specialized reading and study 
skills, necessary for students to function in social 
studies, science, language arts, mathematics, and 
other content areas, will be presented. Techniques 
of determining readability of materials, individu- 
alizing instruction, evaluating and reporting pupil 
progress are also studied. 

330. Teaching Elementary Language 

Arts and Reading. 3 cr. 

Presents psychological principles and historical 
perspective in the language arts, the foundation on 
which a good language arts, program should be 
built. Four skills — listening, speaking, reading, 
writing — as acquired by the child, combined with 
knowledge of the evaluative process, teaching 
methods, and materials, provide a realistic 
approach to teaching language arts and reading 
experience. 

331. Teaching Elementary Social 

Studies. 3 cr. 

Provides a combination of theoretical and practi- 
cal models which furnish multi-level approaches 
to problem-solving, materials, activities, and 
resources inherent in a good social studies 
program. 

332. Teaching Elementary Mathematics. 3 cr. 

Theories, techniques, practices, and content per- 
taining to mathematics are presented. Emphasis is 
on exploratory and systematic instructional styles; 
games as an instructional strategy. 

333. Teaching Elementary Science. 3 cr. 

Study of theories, techniques, practices, and con- 
tent of the science area. Accent is on discovery and 
inquiry instructional styles; organizing for 
learning. 

484. Children's Literature. 3 cr. 

A general survey of books and other printed 
materials for children; criteria for the evaluation 
and analysis of children's books; types of books 
available, considered in terms of interest, needs, 
and abilities of children. 

490, 491. Student Teaching- 
Elementary. 9-12 cr. 

Student teaching in an approved elementary 
school under the direct supervision of a cooperat- 
ing teacher. Prerequisites: Senior status, good aca- 
demic standing, completion of required profes- 
sional courses, and recommendation of faculty. 

493. Student Teaching — Elementary. 6 cr. 

Student teaching in elementary education for stu- 
dents in the secondary or special education pro- 
grams who wish to complete requirements in two 
certification areas. Registration is concurrent with 
Ed. 490-Secondary or Ed. 490-Special Education. 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

215. Teaching Grammar and 

Composition. 3 cr. 

Examines various ways to teach grammar, lan- 
guage, and composition; provides opportunity for 
students to review the basics of grammar and 
composition and to develop lessons for teaching 
those grammar areas at the elementary, secondary 
levels and in special education. 

216. Teaching Literature — 

Prose, Poetry, and Drama. 1 cr. 

Focuses on planning and teaching techniques to 
prepare and present literature utilizing a genre, a 
chronological or thematic approach; the four ses- 
sions involve an approach to literature experience, 
teaching prose, teaching poetry, and teaching 
drama. 

316. Teaching Secondary Mathematics 

and Science. 3 cr. 

Designed to acquaint the student with methods 
and materials for teaching specific models; 
research and field-based activities are expected. 

318. Teaching Secondary Foreign 
Languages. 3 cr. 

Explores a variety of approaches for teaching for- 
eign languages; grammar, structure, verbal exer- 
cises, and literature germane to the specific lan- 
guage to be taught will be discussed. 

319. Teaching Secondary Social 

Studies. 3 cr. 

This is a competency-based experience for social 
studies/history majors that develops evaluation 
skills, knowledge of curriculums, media and tech- 
nological experiences, and methods; expands plan- 
ning and questioning skills. 

490, 491. Students Teaching — 

Secondary. 9-12 cr. 

Student teaching in an approved public secondary 
school under the direct supervision of a cooperat- 
ing teacher. Prerequisites: Senior status, good aca- 
demic standing, completion of required profes- 
sional courses, and recommendation of faculty. 

493. Student Teaching — 

Secondary. 6 cr. 

Student teaching in secondary education for stu- 
dents in the elementary or special education pro- 
gram who wish to complete requirements in two 
certification areas. Registration is concurrent with 
Ed. 490-Elementary or Ed. 490-Special Education. 

497. Reading in Secondary Schools. 3 cr. 

A survey course in the teaching of reading; appro- 
priate for secondary education majors. Major 
emphasis is on methods of teaching reading, the 
materials for evaluating pupil growth in reading, 
and reading in the content subjects. 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 
These courses are designed to prepare students for 
teaching mentally and/or physically handicapped 
pupils, including brain injured, emotionally and 
socially disturbed, learning disabled. 



209. Foundations of Special 

Education. 3 cr. 

A survey of the educational, physical, psychologi- 
cal, and social characteristics of exceptional per- 
sons; an overview of special education methods 
and programs; introduction of judicial and legal 
aspects. 

211, 212, 213, 214. Field 

Experience. 2 cr. each 

Classroom and other experiences in educational, 
social welfare, and vocational settings as an 
observer and participant. Enrollment with consent 
of Director of Students Teaching and School of 
Education faculty advisor. Students may choose 
211 (Elementary) or 212 (Secondary) which 
involve the mildly handicapped, 213 which is with 
the severely handicapped, or 214 which is with 
pre-vocational/vocational pupils. 

272, 273. Art, Music, and Physical Education 
for the Classroom Teacher. 3 cr. each 

An introduction to the basic principles and con- 
cepts of teaching visual arts, physical education, 
health, and music to children of elementary school 
age, including exceptional children. 

276. Methods of Special 

Education. 3 cr. 

An introduction to management techniques uti- 
lized in programs for exceptional persons; infor- 
mation covering educational assessment proce- 
dures; design and implementation of individual 
educational programs and methods for individual- 
izing instruction; examination of judicial and legal 
aspects. Prerequisite: 209 or equivalent. 

386. Teaching the Mildly 

Handicapped. 3 cr. 

Evaluation, integration, and implementation of 
theoretically based methodologies, curricula, 
instructional techniques, and evaluation proce- 
dures for students who have been labeled brain 
injured, learning disabled, mentally retarded, 
physically handicapped, socially and emotionally 
disturbed. Prerequisites: 209, 276. 

387. Teaching the Severely 

Handicapped. 3 cr. 

Evaluation and integration of the various theories, 
methodologies, curricula, instructional techniques, 
and evaluation procedures for severely handi- 
capped persons labeled brain injured, learning dis- 
abled, mentally retarded, physically handicapped, 
socially and emotionally disturbed. Prerequisites: 
209, 276, or permission of instructor. 

388. Vocational Education for the 
Handicapped. 3 cr. 

Overview of pre-vocational, career, and occupa- 
tional education programs to be used for excep- 
tional persons. Students will be given information 
and experiences enabling them to design and 
implement instructional programs appropriate to 
the vocational needs of mentally and physically 
handicapped pupils. Prerequisites: 209, 276, or 
permission of instructor. 



83 



477. Methods in Special 

Education II. 3 cr. 

Development and implementation of an individu- 
alized student teaching readiness plan that empha- 
sizes the management of problem behaviors and 
development of instructional environments; 
includes supervised field experience, independent 
study, and individual learning conferences. Pre- 
requisites: 209, 276, 386. 

490, 491. Student Teaching- 
Special Education. 9-12 cr. 

A full semester of supervised classroom experience 
in a carefully selected school for mentally and/or 
physically handicapped pupils. Prerequisites: 
senior status, good academic standing, completion 
of required professional courses, and recommen- 
dation of faculty. 



493. Student Teaching — 

Special Education. 6 cr. 

Student teaching in special education for students 
in the elementary or secondary education program 
who wish to complete requirements in two certifi- 
cation areas. Registration is concurrent with Ed. 
490-Elementary or Ed. 490-Secondary Education. 




84 



School of Music 



HISTORY 

Duquesne University, recognizing that it was most 
fortunately situated to offer outstanding opportu- 
nities for professional preparation in music, in 
1926 established a School of Music with a four- 
year course of study leading to the Bachelor of 
Music degree. 

The music education program was approved by 
the Pennsylvania Department of Education in 
1930. In 1959 the School became an associate 
member of the National Association of Schools of 
Music and in 1966 was elected to full membership. 

On April 29, 1967 a new air-conditioned music 
building was dedicated. Van Cliburn was awarded 
an honorary Doctor of Music degree on this occa- 
sion. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

The administration and faculty of the School of 
Music believe that the development of the artistic 
personality is entirely compatible with the objec- 
tives of scholars in all fields. It is felt that the best 
place to educate music students to take their place 
in society is in a situation where they have an 
opportunity to share their academic courses in 
classes with students from other schools of the 
University. 

The great advantage of a solid musical prepara- 
tion and the opportunity to participate in nation- 
ally recognized organizations and in performances 
of professional caliber are available to all students. 

The faculty of musical scholars and artists with 
whom Duquesne students work believes that fine 
talents are best encouraged and developed in an 
atmosphere that is friendly while at the same time 
committed to the development of excellence. 

The faculty, selected with care, includes the 
names of concert and opera soloists, members of 
the Casals Festival Orchestra, the Pittsburgh Sym- 
phony, nationally known composers, authors, 
arrangers, conductors, clinicians, and music edu- 
cators. The Pittsburgh Symphony, Pittsburgh 
Opera, chamber music and concert series, WDUQ 
(the Duquesne University radio station) and the 
high level of interest on the part of other radio and 
television stations in the arts serve as unusual 
stimuli to the eager music student. 

The Symphony Band, in its many performances 
on and off campus, presents a wide variety of stan- 
dard and contemporary repertoire. 

The Symphony Orchestra offers fine opportuni- 
ties for students interested in orchestral literature. 
Association with teachers who are members of the 
Pittsburgh Symphony is an exceptional advantage. 

The school also maintains various vocal and 
instrumental ensembles that are receiving national 
recognition for the excellence of their perform- 
ances. 



The objectives of the School of Music are to 
educate teachers and performers of music who 
should possess a sensitive and intelligent musi- 
cianship, and who will be equipped, by reason of 
their general and professional education, to accept 
positions in fields of performance, education, ther- 
apy and church music. 

ADMISSION 

Students who are interested in applying for admis- 
sion to the School of Music should request an 
application from the Office of Admissions. 
Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
15282. After applications have been processed, 
candidates will receive a notice requesting that 
they contact the Office of the School of Music to 
arrange an appointment for an audition and a the- 
ory entrance examination. Specific instructions 
concerning the audition will then be mailed to the 
applicant. A tape recording will be accepted for 
those living more than 1 50 miles from the Univer- 
sity. However, in the event the recording is not 
satisfactory, a personal audition may be required. 
All applicants will be notified of the status of their 
candidacy as soon as possible. 

Students planning to major in Music are urged 
to begin study of piano and theory prior to 
entrance. 

Students planning to major in Sacred Music or 
organ will receive a Sacred Music Handbook 
which outlines specific admission and graduation 
requirements for the Sacred Music Degree Pro- 
grams and Organ Study. 

ADVISEMENT 

At initial enrollment, every student is assigned a 
faculty advisor who provides assistance with aca- 
demic matters, especially during pre-registration 
periods. Guidance in professional objectives will 
also be provided by faculty committees estab- 
lished for that purpose. 

SPECIAL FEES 

Student Teaching $ 25 

Instruction in voice or instrument as 

a minor, each semester 100 

Instruction in voice or instrument as 

a major, each semester 200 

Piano Class Fee, each semester 35 

Instrumental rental each semester Variable 

Instrument for class use 35 

Organ practice (major or minor) 

each semester 30 

Music School fee 25 

DEGREES 

The School offers programs leading to two under- 
graduate degrees: Bachelor of Music and Bachelor 
of Science in Music Education. The Bachelor of 



85 



Music degree may be earned with a major in 
piano, organ, voice, orchestral instruments, jazz 
and in sacred music with a major in organ or 
voice. The programs are intended for students 
interested primarily in performance careers in 
concert, television, radio, symphony orchestra, 
opera or teaching in colleges and private studios, 
and for those interested in pursuing careers as 
church musicians. 

Two other degrees are offered: one in music edu- 
cation and the other in music therapy; the former 
is designed to meet certification requirements for 
teaching in elementary and secondary schools 
while the latter leads to certification as a registered 
music therapist. In order to receive the Music 
Therapy Degree or its equivalency for certification 
(by NAMT), all Music Therapy students are 
required to take a prescribed number and 
sequence of courses in Music Therapy, and give 
evidence of competency in the field, as determined 
by the Music Therapy Department. This includes 
a six month internship. 

EQUIPMENT 

The School of Music has 73 pianos including 56 
Steinways. All practice rooms have Steinway 
uprights. There are two Moeller and one Fischer 
practice organs, an electronic organ, a three man- 
ual Moeller organ and one Furher tracker pipe 
organ. In addition there are two pipe organs by 
Kilgen and Tellers and one Rodgers electronic the- 
atre organ on campus for recitals and practice. 
More than 300 orchestral and band instruments 
are available for instrument classes. Listening and 
recording equipment are of professional quality. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Chapters of the national music organizations Phi 
Mu Alpha Sinfonia and Mu Phi Epsilon contribute 
substantially to the students' professional and 
social development. The Music Educators 
National Conference has an active student chapter 
which sponsors professional programs and attends 
and participates in the state, regional, and national 
activities of the association. There are active stu- 
dent chapters of the American Guild of Organists 
and the National Association for Music Therapy. 
Student Council is the organization which is 
designed to represent the total student body of the 
School of Music. In addition, it provides an excel- 
lent vehicle of communication among students, 
faculty, and administration 

HONOR AWARDS 

The Dean's Award is presented to a senior music 
student for general excellence. 

The Seibert Medal is presented to a senior for 
excellence in violin or piano upon recommenda- 
tion of departmental committee. 

George Barrere Memorial Scholarship. The Pitts- 
burgh Flute Club offers a scholarship in flute in 



memory of George Barrere, founder of the first 
flute club in the United States. This $300 scholar- 
ship is awarded to a freshman or sophomore flute 
major. 

Polish Arts League Scholarship is made annually 
by the Polish Arts League of Pittsburgh to an out- 
standing performer in the School of Music. Prefer- 
ence will be given to a student of Polish ancestry. 
Other students will not be excluded from consider- 
ation. 

Louis Rocereto Memorial Scholarship is given to 
an outstanding junior studying a woodwind 
instrument. 

James Hunter Memorial Scholarship is given to a 
senior with the highest academic and performance 
record. 

Andre Marchal Award is presented to the organ 
student with the highest standing in performance. 

Jean Langlais Award is presented to the organ 
student with the highest standing in Sacred Music. 

Numerous talent scholarship awards of varying 
amounts are available for instrumental and vocal 
study to students who qualify musically and aca- 
demically. All students are considered for such 
awards at the time of their audition, and recipients 
will receive renewals based on semester evalua- 
tions. These awardees are expected to maintain 
high academic standing, exceptional musical per- 
formance and leadership qualities in addition to 
Music School service. 

Women 's Advisory Baoard Scholarships. Competi- 
tive scholarships provided to winners of an annual 
competition. 

Robert F. Minardi Memorial Scholarship. 
Awarded to a deserving student who demonstrates 
financial need in addition to superior musical abil- 
ity. 

Tucci Award. Competitive award provided annu- 
ally to outstanding piano or violin student. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The undergraduate music education program has 
been approved by the Pennsylvania Department 
of Education for the issuance of the Instructional I 
(Provisional) Certificate. Application for the certif- 
icate must be made in the semester in which the 
student plans to graduate. 

RECITAL ATTENDANCE 

All students are encouraged to attend a minimum 
of 30 recitals and concerts sponsored by the 
School of Music per year. 

OTHER ATTENDANCE 
REQUIREMENTS 

All students are required in addition to attend pro- 
fessional events other than concerts pertinent to 
their specific areas of study. 



86 



THEOLOGY REQUIREMENT 

One three-credit course in theology is required of 
everv Roman Catholic student. 



CONSERVATORY 


MAJOR IN PIANO 


Courses 




Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


103,104 


Mus. 


111,112 


Mus. 


131,132 


Mus. 


133,134 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


121,122 


Eng. 


101,102 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


202,204 


Mus. 


211,212 


Mus. 


231,232 


Mus. 


233,234 


Mus. 


143,143 


Elective 




Mus. 


141,141 


Mus. 


243,244 


Mus. 


251,252 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


303,304 


Mus. 


351,352 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


335,336 


Mus. 


141,141 


Mus. 


343,344 


Elective 




Phvsics 




Elective 




Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


403,404 


Elective 




Elective 




Mus. 


313,314 


Mus. 


141,141 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


340 


Mus. 


379,380 


Mus. 




Mus. 


400 


MAJOR IN ORGAN 


Courses 




Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


103,104 


Mus. 


111,112 


Mus. 


131,132 


Mus. 


133,134 


Mus. 


143,143 



PROGRAMS 

Students' interests are served and their abilities 
furthered through their selection from among nine 
different programs, four in applied music, one in 
music education, one in music therapy, two in 
sacred music, and one in jazz. 



Freshman Year Credits 

Fall Spring 

Seminar 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

Applied Music Minor 1 1 

Theory 2 2 

Musicianship I, II 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Eurhythmies 2 2 

English Composition 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Seminar . 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

Applied Music Minor 1 1 

Theory 2 2 

Musicianship III, IV 2 2 

Ensemble .' 1 1 

Academic Elective 3 3 

Chamber Music or 2 2 

Piano Accompanying (2) (2) 

History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Junior Year 

Seminar 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Counterpoint/Analysis 2 2 

Chamber Music or 2 2 

Piano Accompanying (2) (2) 

Academic Elective 3 (3) 

Acoustics 3 

Academic Elective 3 3 

Senior Year 

Seminar 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

Academic or Theology Elective 3 (3) 

Academic Elective (3) 3 

Piano Pedagogy 2 2 

Chamber Music 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Orchestration (2) 2 

Conducting 2 2 

Music Elective 2 2 

Recital (2) 2 

Freshman Year Credits 

Fall Spring 

Seminar 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

Applied Music Minor 1 1 

Theory 2 2 

Musicianship 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 



Mus. 


121,122 


Eng. 


101,102 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


203,124 


Mus. 


211,212 


Mus. 


231,232 


Mus. 


233,234 


Mus. 


143,143 


Elective 




Elective 




Mus. 


251,252 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


303,304 


Mus. 


351,352 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


335,336 


Mus. 


340 


Mus. 


379,380 


Mus. 


478 


Elective 




Physics 




Mus. 


185,186 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


403,404 


Elective 




Elective 




Mus. 


431,432 


Mus. 


451,452 


Mus. 




Mus. 


476 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


400 


MAJOR 


IN VOICE 


Courses 




Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


103,104 


Mus. 


115,116 


Mus. 


131,132 


Mus. 


133,134 


Mus. 


143,144 


Mus. 


121,122 


Mus. 


101,102 


Mus. 


193,194 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


203,204 


Mus. 


215,216 


Mus. 


231,232 


Mus. 


233,234 


Elective 




Mus. 


101,102 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


251,252 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


303,304 


Mus. 


311,312 



87 

Eurhythmies 2 2 

English Composition 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Seminar 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

Applied Music Minor 1 1 

Theory 2 2 

Musicianship 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Academic Elective 3 3 

Academic Elective 3 3 

History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Junior Year 

Seminar 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Counterpoint/Analysis 2 2 

Orchestration 2 

Conducting 2 2 

Choral Methods 2 

Academic Elective 3 

Acoustics (3) 

Voice Class (Minor) 2 2 

Senior Year 

Seminar 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

Academic or Theology Elective 3 

Academic Elective 3 

Improvisation 2 2 

Organ Literature 2 2 

Music Elective 1 2 

Organ Maintenance and Design 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Recital 2 

Freshman Year Credits 

Fall Spring 

Seminar 

Applied Music: Voice I, II 3 3 

Conservatory Piano Class 1 1 

Theory I, II 2 2 

Musicianship I, II 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Eurhythmies I, II 2 2 

English Composition I, II 3 3 

Italian for Musicians I, II 3 2 

Sophomore Year 

Seminar 

Applied Music: Voice III, IV 3 3 

Conservatory Piano Class 1 1 

Theory III, IV 2 2 

Musicianship III, IV 2 2 

Academic Elective 3 3 

French for Musicians I, II 3 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

History and Literature of Music 1 1 

Junior Year 

Seminar 

Applied Music: Voice V, VI 3 3 

Applied Music: Piano V, VI 1 1 



Mus. 351,352 History and Literature of Music 3 3 

Mus. 101,102 German for Musicians I, II 3 2 

Mus. 335,336 Counterpoint/Analysis 2 2 

Mus. 349,349 Vocal Repertoire 1 1 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Elective Academic Elective 3 3 

Senior Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 403,404 Applied Music: Voice VII, VIII 3 3 

Communi- 
cations 280,380 Acting I, II (Academic Elective) 3 3 

Physics Acoustics 3 

Mus. Music Elective 2 

Elective Academic Elective or Theology 3 

Mus. 349,349 Vocal Repertoire 1 1 

Mus. 379,380 Conducting I, II 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Mus. 400 Recital (2) 2 

MAJOR IN ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENT/CLASSICAL GUITAR 

Freshman Year Credits 

Courses Fall Spring 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 103,104 Applied Music 3 3 

Mus. 115,116 Piano Class 1 1 

Mus. 131,132 Theory 2 2 

Mus. 133,134 Musicianship I, II 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Mus. 121,122 Eurhythmies 2 2 

Eng. 101,102 English Composition 3 3 

Mus. 141,141 Chamber Music 2 2 

Sophomore Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 203,204 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 215,216 Piano Class 1 1 

Mus. 231,232 Theory 2 2 

Mus. 233,234 Musicianship III, IV 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Elective Academic Elective 3 3 

Mus. 141,141 Chamber Music 2 2 

Mus. 251,252 History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Junior Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 303,304 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 335,336 Counterpoint/Analysis 2 2 

Mus. 351,352 History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Mus. 141,141 Chamber Music 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Elective Academic Elective 3 

Physics Acoustics 3 

Elective Academic Elective 3 3 

Senior Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 403,404 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 438,439 Composition 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Art 101 Academic Elective (3) 3 

Elective Academic or Theology Elective 3 (3) 

Mus. 379,380 Conducting 2 2 

Mus. 340 Orchestration 2 (2) 

Mus. 141,141 Chamber Music 2 2 

Mus 400 Recital (2) 2 



89 

MAJOR IN JAZZ PERFORMANCE 

Freshman Year Credits 

Courses Fall Spring 

Mus. 103,104 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 131,132 Theory 2 2 

Mus. 133,134 Musicianship 2 2 

Mus. 121,122 Eurhythmies 2 2 

Mus. 1 18,1 19 Applied Music Minor (Piano Class) 1 1 

Eng. 101,102 English Composition 3 3 

Mus. 151,152 Evolution of Jazz Styles 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Mus. 147,148 Jazz Chamber Music 2 2 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Sophomore Year 

Mus. 203,204 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 231,232 Theory 2 2 

Mus. 233,234 Musicianship 2 2 

Mus. 218,219 Applied Music Minor (Jazz Class) 1 1 

Mus. 226,227 Jazz Improvisation 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Mus. 251,252 History and Literature of Music I and II 2 2 

Elective Academic Elective 3 3 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Junior Year 

Mus. 303,304 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 333 Ear Training for Jazz Musicians 2 

Mus. 336 18th C. Counterpoint 2 

Mus. 430,440 Jazz Arranging I and II 2 2 

Mus. 426,427 Jazz Improvisation „ 2 2 

Mus. 351,352 History and Literature of Music III and IV 2 2 

Elective Academic Elective 3 

Elective Academic Elective 3 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Mus. 379,380 Conducting 2 2 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Senior Year 

Mus. 403,404 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 453,453 Jazz Composition 2 2 

Mus. 327 Jazz Pedagogy 2 

Mus. 400 Recital 2 

Mus. 141 Jazz Chamber Music 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Elective Academic Elective 3 

Physics Acoustics 3 

Elective Academic Elective 3 

Elective Academic Elective 3 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

SACRED MUSIC— MAJOR IN ORGAN 

Freshman Year Credits 

Courses Fall Spring 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 103,104 Applied Music Major (organ) 3 3 

Mus. 111,112 Applied Music Minor (piano) 1 1 

Mus. 407,407 Service Playing I, II 1 1 

Mus. 408,408 Church Music Practicum 1 1 

Mus. 131,132 Theory I, II 2 2 

Mus. 133,134 Musicianship I, II 2 2 

Mus. 121,122 Eurhythmies 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Eng. 101,102 English Composition I, II 3 3 

Mus. Chapel Choir 



90 



Sophomore Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 203,204 Applied Music Major (organ) 3 3 

Mus. 211,212 Applied Music Minor (piano) 1 1 

Mus. 407,407 Service Playing III, IV 1 1 

Mus. 408,408 Church Music Practicum 1 1 

Mus. 231 Theory III 2 

Mus. 233,234 Musicianship III, IV 2 2 

Mus. 185,186 Voice Class 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Mus. 251,252 History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Theology 213,214 Old and New Testaments 3 3 

Mus. 380 Conducting II 2 

Mus. Chapel Choir 

Junior Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 303,304 Applied Music Major (organ) 3 3 

Mus. 407,407 Service Playing V, VI 1 1 

Mus. 408,408 Church Music Practicum 1 1 

Mus. 209 Children's Choirs 1 

Mus. 351,352 History and Lit. of Music 2 2 

Mus. 335,336 Counterpoint 2 2 

Mus. 340 Orchestration 2 

Mus. 322 Sacred Choral and Solo Literature 2 

Theology Liturgies 3 

Elective Academic Elective 3 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Elective Academic Elective 3 

Mus. Chapel Choir 

Senior Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 403,404 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 431,432 Organ Improvisation 2 2 

Mus. 451,452 Organ Literature 2 2 

Mus. 408,408 Church Music Practicum 1 1 

Mus. 420 Hymnody 2 

Mus. 421 Gregorian Chant 2 

Mus. 476 Organ Maintenance and Design 2 

Mus. 400 Recital 2 (2) 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Physics Acoustics 3 

Elective Academic Elective 3 3 

Mus. Chapel Choir 

SACRED MUSIC— MAJOR IN VOICE 

Freshman Year Credits 

Courses Fall Spring 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 103,104 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 113,114 Piano Class 1 1 

Mus. 131,132 Theory 2 2 

Mus. 133,134 Musicianship 2 2 

Mus. 121,122 Eurhythmies 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Eng. 101,102 English Composition 3 3 

Theology 213,214 Old and New Testament 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 203,204 Applied Music Major 3 3 

Mus. 213,214 Piano Class 1 1 

Mus. 231,232 Theory 2 2 

Mus. 233,234 Musicianship 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 



91 



Elective 




Lang. 


193,194 


Mus. 


251,252 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


303,304 


Mus. 


311,312 


Mus. 


209 


Mus. 


351,352 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


335,336 


Mus. 


340 


Mus. 


322 


Elective 




Physics 




Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


403,404 


Mus. 


411,412 


Mus. 


407,408 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


421 


Mus. 


420 


Elective 




Mus. 


479 


Mus. 


451,452 


Elective 




Mus. 


400 


MUSIC EDUCATION 


Courses 




Mus. 


105,105 


English 


101,102 


Mus. 


131,132 


Mus. 


133,134 


Mus. 


181 


Mus. 


381 


Mus. 


101,102 


Mus. 


113,114 


Mus. 


121,122 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


189,190 


Mus. 


251,252 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


231,232 


Mus. 


233,234 


Mus. 


185,186 


Mus. 


213,214 


Elective 




Mus. 


201,202 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


289,290 


Mus. 


351,352 


Mus. 


281 


Mus. 


481 


Mus. 


105,105 


Mus. 


389,390 


Mus. 


143,143 


Mus. 


301,302 


Mus. 


387 



Academic Elective 3 3 

Italian for Singers , 3 2 

History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Junior Year 

Seminar 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

Applied Music Minor (Organ) 1 1 

Children's Choirs 1 

History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Counterpoint/Analysis 2 2 

Orchestration 2 

Sacred Choral and Solo Literature 2 

Academic Elective 3 

Acoustics 3 

Senior Year 

Seminar 

Applied Music Major 3 3 

Applied Music Minor (Organ) 1 1 

Service Playing 1 1 

Ensemble 1 1 

Gregorian Chant 2 

Hymnody 2 

Academic Elective 3 

Choral Methods 2 

Organ Literature 2 2 

Academic Elective 3 

Recital 2 

Freshman Year Credits 

Fall Spring 

Seminar 

English Composition 3 3 

Theory 2 2 

Musicianship 2 2 

Woodwind Class 2 (2) 

String Class (2) 2 

Applied Music Major 2 2 

Piano Class 2 2 

Eurhythmies 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Field Observation 

History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Sophomore Year 

Seminar 

Theory 2 2 

Musicianship 2 2 

Voice Class Methods 2 2 

Piano Class 2 2 

Academic Elective 3 3 

Applied Music Major 2 2 

Ensemble 1 1 

Field Observation 

History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Brass Class 2 

Percussion Class 2 

Junior Year 

Seminar 

Field Observation 

Ensemble 1 1 

Applied Music Major 2 2 

Marching Band Techniques or 



92 



Mus. 385 Choral Techniques or 2 

Mus. 327 Jazz Pedagogy & Directing 

Mus. 379,380 Conducting 2 2 

Mus. 340 Orchestration or 

Mus. 440 Jazz Arranging 2 

Mus. 383 Elementary Methods 2 

Mus. 384 Secondary Methods 2 

Elective Academic Electives 9 9 

(History, Sociology, Economics, Communications, Psychology, Acoustics, etc.) 

Senior Year Credits 

Professional Residence* 

Courses Semester Semester 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 401 Applied Music Major 2 

Mus. 143 Ensemble 1 

Education Education Elective 4 

Education Education Elective 3 

(Developmental Foundations of Ed., Orientation to Early Childhood Ed., Foundations of Ed., etc.) 

Elective Academic Elective 2 

Mus. 490 Student Teaching 12 

MUSIC EDUCATION— MAJOR IN MUSIC THERAPY 

Freshman Year Credits 

Courses Fall Spring 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 101,102 Applied Music Major 2 2 

Mus. 113,114 Piano Class 2 2 

Mus. 131,132 Theory 2 2 

Mus. 133,134 Musicianship 2 2 

Mus. 121,122 Eurhythmies 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Mus. 107 Music Therapy Orientation 3 

Mus. 124 Music Therapy Practicum 1 

Soc. 101 Survey of Sociology 3 

English 101,102 English Composition 3 3 

Sophomore Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. 201,202 Applied Music Major 2 2 

Mus. 213,214 Piano Class 2 2 

Mus. 231,232 Theory 2 2 

Mus. 233,234 Musicianship 2 2 

Mus. 251,252 History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Psych. 103 Introduction to Psychology 3 

Mus. 108 Music in Therapy 3 

Mus. 124,124 Music Therapy Practicum 1 1 

Elective Academic Elective 3 3 

Junior Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. *301,302 Applied Music 2 2 

Mus. 315 Piano Improvisation or 

Mus. Methods Class of your choice 2 

Mus. 185,186 Voice Class Methods 2 2 

Mus. 351,352 History and Literature of Music 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Psych. 202 Educational Psychology 3 

Education 309 Foundations in Special Education 3 

Mus. 374 Music and Movement for the Exceptional Child 3 

Physics Acoustics 3 

Mus. 308 Influence of Music on Behavior 2 

Ed. 002 Drug Abuse 1 

Mus. 124,124 Music Therapy Practicum 1 1 



93 



Senior Year 

Mus. 105,105 Seminar 

Mus. *40 1,402 Applied Music 2 2 

Mus. 143,143 Ensemble 1 1 

Mus. 600 Psychological Foundations of Musical Behavior 3 

Mus. 379 Conducting 2 

Mus. 340 Orchestration 2 

Psych. 352 Abnormal Psychology 3 

Bio. 207 Anatomy and Physiology 3 

Mus. 309 Directed Study — Music Therapy 2 

Mus. 310 Recreational Instruments 1 

Elective Academic Elective 3 

Elective Academic (Theology) Elective 3 

Psychology Psychology Elective 3 

Mus. 124,124 Music Therapy Practicum 1 1 

*In accordance with the recommendations made by the School's faculty, the National Association for Music 
Therapy, and taking into consideration performance needs of music therapists, the applied music require- 
ments for therapy majors are altered in this manner: Upon satisfactory completion of the first two years as 
an applied major on the instrument of the individual's choice, determined by audition and juries with the 
appropriate faculty, the student may study one or several instruments for the remaining two years. This 
will enable the student to develop a degree of versatility which can be of considerable use in the practice of 
music therapy. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

APPLIED MUSIC 

101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402. 118, 119, 218, 219. Applied Music 

Applied Music Major for the Bachelor of Minor — Jazz Class. 1 cr. each 

Science in Music Education. 2 cr.each For non-piano majors. Jazz piano techniques 

The study of voice, piano, organ, string, wind, or including comping, harmonic continuity through 

percussion instruments throughout all semesters. common chord progressions, using triads and 7th 

cnorc * s - "^ m any include more advanced comp- 

1 i. j», .' t!v • * in & harmonic continuity through standard and 

Applied Music Major for ■ and harmonic extensions of 9ths, 1 1 ths, 

the Bachelor of Music. 2 or 3 cr. j j -^ 

Private study of voice, piano, organ, string, wind, 

or percussion instruments throughout all semes- 400. Recital. 2 cr. 
ters. Credits are distributed according to depart- Transfer of Credit. Transfer credit in the under- 
mental curricula. graduate program can be evaluated by a faculty 
The candidate for the Bachelor of Music degree panel. 

must give a recital during the senior year. The Changing Assigned Applied Music Teacher. 

recital will be presented to a faculty committee for Ch in assi d teachers can become eflfectlve 

approval at least one month prior to the date of on , at the b inning of a new semester and can . 

F not be accomplished while a semester is in pro- 
Ill, 112, 211, 212, 218, 219, 311, 312, gress. The student must discuss the feasibility of a 
411, 412. Applied Music Minor for all proposed change with the appropriate chairman. 

Bachelor Degrees. 1 cr. each 

All students must choose an applied music minor BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

upon entrance. Those students who do not elect „ 

• * * a •* a Bassoon 
piano as a major must study it as a secondary 

instrument. 103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Students not majoring in piano must satisfy the Scales and arpeggios in all keys; Kovar scales, five 

following piano requirements before graduation: note studies and interval studies; selected studies 

(a) construct and play with facility major and and Weissenborn and Milde; solos by Weis- 

minor scales and cadences in all keys: (b) read senborn, Foret and Mouquet 

simple four-part music: (c) play a simple Clementi ~rn -04 -i u 

Sonatina and excerpts from Schumann's "Album ^ V. . , T , 4 i . , 

*. + . „ v ^ .. • , . A . j . Continue scales and arpeggios; Kovar technical 

lor the Young , or their equivalent. A student . ,. ~ , , of jt^i r\ u 

" • • • •„ , . .- A studies, Oubradous. Scales and Daily Drills; 

majoring in piano or organ will select an applied . ... , V> * e* a- u a * c * A 

_ , • ?■„ *u+u -a cu- a • c* Milde. Concert Studies; Handel, Sonata in C 

music minor with the guidance of his advisor. Stu- x , , , n '. ,,., , ' 

* , u c i * ^u • • • Minor; solos bv Bozza and Vidal. 
dents who fail to meet the minimum requirements ' y 

in the time allotted for their particular degree must 303, 304. 3 cr. each 

continue study until the requirements have been Oubradous, Scales and Daily Drills; Milde, Con- 

fulfilled, cert Studies; Orefici, Bravura Studies; selected 



94 



passages from the Bach Canatas; Mozart Concerto 
in B flat; Beethoven Quintet, representative con- 
temporary solos; orchestra studies. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Gambaro, Etudes for Bassoon; Bozza, Fifteen 
Daily Studies; Sonatas by Hindemith and Saint- 
Saens; orchestral and chamber music studies; 
Bozza, Concertino: the contra bassoon. 

Clarinet 

103,104. 3 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in various articulations; 
Langenus, Scale Studies; Rose, Forty Studies, 
Cavallini, Thirty Caprices; Weber, Fantasy; Le 
Fevre, Fantasie Caprice; J. B. Albert, 24 Varied 
Etudes; H. Klose, Part II. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios continued; Rose, Twenty 
Studies after Rode; Jeanjean, Twenty-five Etudes; 
Weber Concertos; Mozart, Quintet for Clarinet 
and Strings; Weber First Concerto; representative 
contemporary solos; orchestral studies. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Oubradous, Scales and Daily Drills; Milde, Con- 
cert Studies; selected passages from the Bach Can- 
tatas; Mozart Concerto; Beethoven Quintet; 
Weber, 2nd Concerto; Brahms Sonatas; French 
Contemporary solos; representative contemporary 
solos; orchestral studies. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Jeanjean, Sixteen Modern Studies; Perrier, 
Vingtdeux Etudes Modernes; Spohr, Concertos; 
Debussy, Premier Rhapsodie; Weber, Grand Duo 
Concertante; representative contemporary solos 
and sonatas. 

Double Bass 

103,104. 3 cr. each 

Scales and intervals in all keys, Simandl, Thirty 
Etudes. Selected pieces. Orchestral studies. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Hrabe, Eight-six Etudes, Short pieces by Kous- 
sevitsky and Bottesini. Orchestral studies. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Nanny, Etudes de Kreutzer et de Fiorillo; con- 
certos by Koussevitsky, Dittersdory and Bottesini, 
Orchestral studies. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Nanny, Dix Etudes Caprices; Storch, Twenty Con- 
cert Etudes; concertos by Koussevitsky and 
Dragonetti, Orchestral studies. 

Flute 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Analysis of student's playing and basic corrections 
if necessary, Taffanel-Gaubert, scales, scales in 
thirds, trills. Selected studies by M. Moyse and 
Andersen, Etudes Op. 33 and 37; Boehm Etudes, 



Op. 37; Kuhlau, Duets, Sonatas of the Baroque 
Period. Solos by Doppler, Chaminade, Mozart, 
Moyse, Kuhlau. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Taffanel-Gaubert Scales, scales in thirds and 
sixths, chromatic scales, arpeggios and trills. 
Anderson, Etudes Op. 21; Boehm, Caprices Op. 
26; Moyse, De la Sonorite. Selected duets by 
Kuhlau, Koechlin, etc. concertos by Haydn and 
Mozart; sonatas by LeClair, J. S. Bach and 
Vivaldi; L. Moyse, French Music for Flute. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Continue scale study; Taffanel-Gaubert, Progres- 
sive Studies; Barrere, The Flutists Formulae; 
Anderson, Etudes Op. 30; Altes-Barrere, 26 
Selected Studies; Moyse, Etudes et Exercises Tech- 
niques; Torchio-Wummer, Orchestral Studies, 
Bach, sonatas and arias from the religious works. 
Arrieu, Sonatine; Telemann, Suite in a minor; M. 
Moyse, Golden Age; Solos by Hue, Enesco, Grif- 
fes, Gaubert, and Varese. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Taffanel-Gaubert Scales, the half note equals MM 
120; scales in thirds, sixths, octaves and tenths; 
Moyse, De la Sonorite, Mechanism and Chromat- 
ics; Anderson, Etudes Artistiques Op. 15, includ- 
ing the memorization of certain selected studies; 
Anderson Op. 63; Jeanjean, Etudes Modernes; 
Orchestral Studies; Bach, Sonata in A minor for 
unaccompanied flute: sonatas by Hindemith, Rei- 
necke; Concerto by Ibert; works by representative 
contemporary composers. 

Guitar — Classical 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Evaluation of student's abilities and basic correc- 
tions if necessary. Scales, major and minor up to 
four sharps and flats; Carcassi Method; selected 
studies from Carcassi Twenty-Five Etudes Op. 60; 
Renaissance dances; works by Carulli, Aguado, 
Sor. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

All Scales major and minor, two and three 
octaves; Henze Method; Sor Concert Etudes; one 
suite and selected pieces from the Renaissance and 
Baroque; works by Luis Milan, Tarrega, Ponce, 
and Villa-Lobos. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Continuation of technical studies of the first two 
years; lute music transcribed for guitar; Dowland, 
Bach, Sor Concert Etudes and Sonatas; chamber 
ensemble works by Boccherini, Schubert, 
Scheidler, Ibert, Paganini. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Bach suite, a sonata or suite by a 20th-century 
composer; concerto by Vivaldi, Giuliani, Caruli, 
or by a 20th-century composer. 



95 



Guitar — Jazz 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Evaluation of student's abilities; basic technique 
and reading abilities including reading knowledge 
through VII positions' all major scales in all posi- 
tions, Berklee Method Book I and Melodic 
Rhythm Studies Book by William G. Leavitt; 
basic chord theory, basic position folk chords and 
alterations, all barre chords, and working knowl- 
edge of basic jazz chord forms; beginning study of 
chord-melody solo playing and single-note tech- 
niques; standard guitar solos. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Continue single-note technique, chord studies; all 
major and minor scales; continue chord-melody 
playing; Joe Pass Guitar Style, Improvised Chord 
Solos and Single Note Improvised Solos Books; 
intensive rhythm jazz chord studies (may use 
Bucky Pizzarelli's. A Touch of Glass or Ronny 
Lee's Jazz Guitar Method Bk. II); intensive chord- 
melody playing, including arrangements done by 
the student; beginning single-note improvisation; 
standard guitar repertoire; Berklee Method Book I. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Continue rhythm playing studies, chord-melody 
playing, and single-note improvisation studies; 
Berklee Method Book III; chord-soloing and 
development of repertoire, including solos by 
George M. Smith, Eddie Lang, Dick McDonough, 
Carl Kress, John Smith, Tony Mottola, George 
Van Eps; Single-string studies; Bach inventions, 
Kreutzer violing studies, Paganini violin studies. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Intensive single-note improvisation and improvi- 
sational lines; REH Publications for single-note 
study (Diorio, Carlson, Mock, Kato, Hutchinson, 
Joe Pass' Jazz Solos and Jazz Classics); Charlie 
Christian Studies, Howard Roberts' Method and 
Materials; Wes Montgomery's Octave-Style Play- 
ing; understanding "fusion" music; chord-melody 
arranging from traditional and contemporary liter- 
ature; record transcription both already existing 
and ones done by the student (Coryell, Pass 
Barnes, Burrell, Roberts, DeMaeola, Benson and 
others.) 

Harp 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Lariviere Exercises and technical studies. Standard 
orchestra parts. Bochsa Etudes opus 318, Book II. 
Pieces grade of difficulty of Grandjany Aria in 
Classic Style; Tournier, Images (Suite I); Saint- 
Saens, Fantasie. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Technical studies. Bochsa Etudes, opus 62. Stan- 
dard orchestra cadenzas. Pieces of grade difficulty 
of: Tournier, Feerie; Rousseau, Variations Pasto- 
rales; Grandjany, Fantasie on a Theme of Haydn. 



303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Technical studies. Orchestra parts. Bochsa Etudes, 
opus 34. Pieces grade of difficulty of: Hindemith, 
Sonata; Handel, Concerto in Bb major; Ravel, 
Introduction and Allegro. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Technical studies. Pieces grade of difficulty of: 
Faure Impromptu; C.P.E. Bach, Sonata; Salzedo, 
Scintillation; Debussy, Danses Sacre et Profane. 

Horn 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in all keys; review of funda- 
mentals: etudes from Kopprasch, Pottag, and 
Mueller; selected etudes from Mozart and Strauss. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Continuing of fundamentals; etudes from Kling, 
Belloli, Alphonse; selected solos from Mozart, 
Haydn, R. Strauss; orchestral studies. 

303-304. 3 cr. each 

Etudes from Alphonse, Gallay, Pottag; selected 
solos from Beethoven, Dukas, and Saint-Saens; 
orchestral studies. 

403-404. 3 cr. each 

Etudes from Alphone, Schuller, and Gallay; solos 
from Schumann, Dukas, and Saint-Saens; orches- 
tral studies. 

Oboe 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Review of basic technique; Barret Studies; 
Andraud, Vade Mecum; scales and arpeggios in all 
keys, Telemann, Sonata in A minor; solos by 
Schumann, Handel and Bach. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Continue scales and arpeggios including scales in 
thirds and measured trills; Barret, Grand Etudes 
and Duets; Andraud, Vade Mecum; Bleuzet, 
selected studies from Technique of the Oboe; Han- 
del sonatas; Marcello Concerto. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Continue scales and arpeggios; Bleuzet, selected 
studies for range and endurance; orchestral stud- 
ies; Cimaros, Concerto; paris Conservatory solos; 
representative contemporary compositions. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Blauzet, Technique of the Oboe; scales in all artic- 
ulations, scales in groups of five and seven, scales 
by interval, arpeggios and broken arpeggios: 
orchestral studies including the works of J. S. 
Bach; sonatas by Telemann and Hindemith; solos 
by Busser, Jolivet, Rivier; Mozart Concerto, 
Symphonie Concertante and Quartet; Concerto by 
Goosens; contemporary solos. 

Organ 

103, 104. 2-3 cr. each 

Review of basic organ technique. Selected works 
from the early English, Italian, German and 
French schools. Bach, Orgelbuchlien; selected 



96 



preludes and fugues. Vierne, 24 Pieces; Langlais, 
Dupre, Franck. Organ Class I, Pedal Scales in all 
major keys pedals alone; Hymn playing; transposi- 
tion; modulations to closely related keys. Intro- 
duction to figured bass and harmonization of sim- 
ple melodies. 

203, 204. 2-3 cr. each 

Selected works by Brahms, Mendelssohn, Schu- 
mann, Hindemith. Joseph Willcox Jenkins, Six 
Pieces; Dupre, Antiphons; Messiaen, Le Banquet 
Celeste or Ascension Suite, mvts. 1 or 4; Langlais; 
Franck; Schroeder or Pepping; Vierne, Pieces de 
Fantaisie; Bach, Orgelbuchlein, Schubler Chorales, 
Concerti, Preludes and Fugues, Trio Sonatas. 

Organ Class II; Continuation of pedal scales, 
hands and feet. Hymn playing. Modulation, trans- 
position, counterpoint and figured bass. Contin- 
ued harmonization of melodies. Score and clef 
reading. 

303, 304. 2-3 cr. each 

Selected works by D'Aquin; deGrigny; Handel; 
Mozart; Sweelinck; Franck; Langlais; Messiaen; 
Bach, Preludes and Fugues, Trio Sonatas, 
Orgelbuchlien, Great 18 chorales. Works by con- 
temporary American composers. 

Organ Class III; Continuation of pedal scales, 
hymn playing; accompaniments, transposition, fig- 
ured bass, clef reading in open score; conducting 
from the console. 

403, 404. 2-3 cr. each 

Franck, Chorales; Messiaen, Nativite; Lizst; 
Dupre; Durufle; Langlais; Vierne and Widor, Sym- 
phonies; Alain; Tournemire and selected works by 
contemporary composers; Bach, Passacaglia and 
Fugue, extended Preludes and Fugues, 
Clavierubang Part III selections. Recital. 

407, 408. Service Playing. 1 cr. each 

The objective of this course is to develop the ser- 
vice playing skills necessary to play for church 
services of all denominations through a study of 
applied harmony, counterpoint, hymnody, 
anthem accompaniments and conducting from the 
console. 

431, 432. Organ Improvisation. 2 cr. each 

A practical application of the basic tools of 
improvisation including harmonization of melo- 
dies at the organ and the use of two and three 
voice counterpoint in varying styles, short ABA 
forms and chorale preludes with emphasis on their 
liturgical application. 

413. Organ Pedagogy. 2 cr. each 

Students learn through demonstation the philoso- 
phies, methods, and materials of teaching both 
beginning and advanced students. Junior standing 
is required. 

Percussion 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Fundamental snare drum technique and its appli- 
cation to musical notation, exercises in rhythm 



phrasing, control. Elements of tympani technique, 
their application to classical literature, tuning. 
Rudimentary xylophone technique; scales, arpeg- 
gios, forms. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Advanced snare drum studies, repertoire. Three 
and four tympani exercises, orchestral literature. 
Intermediate xylophone studies, transcriptions for 
solo. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Tympani study through romantic and contempo- 
rary literature. Advanced xylophone exercises, 
transciptions. Latin American instrumental tech- 
niques; use of special accessories in late 1 9th and 
20th century literature. Repertoire in all instru- 
ments. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Examination of representative solo material for all 
percussion instruments, preparation of solo for 
recital. 

Piano 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Bach, Three-Part Inventions; Haydn and Mozart, 
selected sonatas, Beethoven, Op. 10 and Op. 14; 
Chopin waltzes, mazurkas, nocturnes; selections 
from modern repertoire. Major and minor scales 
in different rhythms and tempi, and deminished 
arpeggios. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Scarlatti, selected sonatas; Bach, Well-Tempered 
Clavier; Beethoven, Op. 22, Op. 31; Chopin, 
preludes, impromptus, and nocturnes; Brahms, 
Intermezzi, Rhapsodies; selections from Impres- 
sionistic and Contemporary repertoire. All major 
and minor scales, dominant and diminished sev- 
enth arpeggios. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Bach, French Suites, Partitas, Well-Tempered Cla- 
vier; Beethoven, sonatas of the difficulty of Op. 10 
No 3; Chopin, Scherzi, Ballades, and Etudes; 
Schumann, Fantasiestucke. Papillons; Debussy, 
Preludes; selected Contemporary repertoire. Con- 
tinue scales and dominant and diminished sev- 
enth arpeggios, plus major and minor arpeggios. 

313. Piano Pedagogy I. 2 cr. each 

Students will become acquainted with the tech- 
niques and materials for teaching piano at the ele- 
mentary level. For piano majors; junior standing 
is required. 

314. Piano Pedagogy II. 2 cr. each 

A continuation of 313 concentrating on the tech- 
niques and materials for teaching piano at the 
intermediate and advanced levels. 

243, 244, 343, 344. Piano 

Accompanying 2 cr. each 

This course is designed for the undergraduate with 
the purpose of affording the student instruction in 
the art of piano accompanying. 



403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Bach, English Suites, Partitas, Toccatas, Well- 
Tempered Clavier; Beethoven sonatas from mid- 
dle and late periods; more extensive compositions 
from the Romantic Period; Ravel, Jeu d'eau; 
Debussy, Estampes; at least on work selected from 
the standard concerto literature; contemporary 
literature. Continue scales and arpeggios. 

Saxophone 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Mule. Scales and Arpeggios; Small, 27 Melodious 
and Rhythmic Exercises; Labanchi-Iasilli, 33 Con- 
cert Etudes, Vol. I; Concertino by Mulihaud. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Mule, Scales and Arpeggios Vol. II, Lamotte 18 
Studies for Saxophone; Salviani-Iasilli, Exercises 
in All the Practical Keys; Guillon, Sontaine; 
Glazounov, concerto. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Mule. Scales and Arpeggios Vol. Ill; Left, 24 
Etudes; Capella. 20 Grand Etudes; Bozza, 12 
Etudes; Bozza. Concertino; Ibert, Concertino. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Rascher, Top Tones and Four Octave Studies; 
Mule. 53 Studies, Lyon. Thirty-two Studies; 
Moritz. Concerto; Contemporary solos, orchestra 
studies. 

Trombone 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Tone production and diaphragmatic breathing, 
embouchure development. Lip studies, Remen- 
ington or Stacey, and Gaetke Daily Lip and 
Tongue exercises. All major and minor scales and 
arpeggios. Methods, Voxman, Rouchut Melodius 
Etudes I, R. Fink Clef Studies, Arban Complete 
Method, La Fosse School of Sight Reading Stud- 
ies. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Tone production, embouchure development, lip 
flexibility, clef studies. Major and minor scales in 
all keys and arpeggios. Rochut Melodious Etudes 
II, Blue Studies Complete, Kopprasch, Tonguing 
studies, Single, Double and Triple, Arban Com- 
plete Method. Solos, Golliard Sonata; Marceau, 
Symphonique, Ropartz, andante and allegro 
orchestral studies; K. Brown, and Band studies. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Stacy lip studies or Gaetke Daily lip and tongue 
exercises. Rouchut Melodious Etudes III, Werner, 
Thirty-eight Studies. Blazhevich, Clef studies. 
Bach, Cello suites transcribed for trombone; La 
Fosse; Hindemith Sonata, Vivaldi, cello sonatas; 
Handel, Sonata #3 in F Major; Orchestral and 
Band exerpts (K. Brown). 

403, 404. 2 cr. each 

Gaetke, Lip Flexibility; La Fosse, complete 
method. School of Sight reading D, E, F; 
Blazhevich, Twenty-six Sequences in Bass, Tenor, 



97 



and Alto Clefs; P. Masson, Method-Thirty Cap- 
pricio Studies; Bozza, Twelve Fantasies; 
Telemann, Ballade; Grondahl, Concerto, Band 
and Orchestral studies. Also study of Bass Trom- 
bone. 

Trombone and Euphonium 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

All major and minor scales and straight arpeggios 
m.m. quarter note 72. Remington warmups; 
Stacey, Lip studies; Arban, Complete Methods for 
Trombone; Blume, Studies Vol. I; Rochut, Melo- 
dious Studies Vol. I; La Fosse, Sight Reading stud- 
ies. Voxman, selected studies. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

All major and minor scales and straight arpeggios, 
one or two octaves, in simple and compound 
rhythmic patterns, MM quarter note = 72. Stacey, 
Lip Flexibility, Arban, Complete Method for 
Trombone; Intensive study of tonguing (single, 
double and triple); La Fosse, Sight Reading Stud- 
ies; Rochut, Melodious Studies Vol. II; Blume, 
Studies Vol. II; Kopprasch, Studies Vol. I; study of 
tenor clef; Guilmant, Morceau Symphonique; 
Ropartz, Andante and Allegro; orchestral and 
band studies. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Gaetke, Daily Lip and Tongue Exercises; Gaetke, 
Scales and Arpeggios; Rochut, Melodious Studies 
Vol. Ill; Blume, Studies Vol. Ill; Kopprasch, Stud- 
ies Vol. II; Blazhevich, Clef Studies; Bach Cello 
Suites transcribed for Trombone; Blazhevich, 
Concert Duets; Sanders Sonata; Galliard, Six 
Sonatas; Vivaldi, Cello Sonatas; Hindemith, 
Sonata; Orchestral Studies. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Gaetke, Lip Flexibility; La Fosse, Complete 
Method for Trombone; Blazhevich, 26 Sequences 
in Bass, Tenor and Alto Clefs; P. Creston, Fantasy; 
J. Casterede, Fantasie D. Milhand, Concerto 
d'Hiver; orchestral studies. 

Trumpet 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Major and Minor scales and arpeggios; Schloss- 
berg, Daily Drills; Clark, Technical Studies; 
Arban, Complete Method; Hering, The Orchestra 
Trumpeter; Corelli/Fitzgerald, Sonata VIII; 
Latham, Suite. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Scales in rhythmic and articulation patterns; Con- 
tinued Schlossberg and Clark; Sachse, 100 Etudes; 
Goldman, Practical Studies; Glantz, The Com- 
plete Harry Glantz; P. M. Dubois, 12 Etudes 
variees; J. Haydn, Concerto; E. Bozza, Caprice; H. 
Purcell, Sonata. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Major and minor diatonic scales; Continued 
Schlossberg and Sachse; Nagel, Speed Studies; 
Brandt, 34 Studies, Charlier, 36 Etudes, Bartold, 
Orchestral Excerpts; M. Gisondi, Bach for the 



98 



Trumpet; J. N. Hummel, Concerto, P. Hindemith, 
Sonata; G. F. Handel, Suite in D. Major. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

M. Broiles, Studies and Duets, Vol. I; R. Sabarich, 
10 Etudes; Continued Bartold, Orchestral 
Excerpts; Kennan, Sonata; J. M. Molter, Concerto 
No. 1; G. Enesco, Legend. 

Tuba 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in all keys; review of tone 
production; Rochut, Melodious Studies Vol. I; 
Blume Studies Vol. I; selected solos. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in all keys with various artic- 
ulations; Rochut, Melodious Studies Vol. II; 
Blume Studies Vol. II; selected solos; orchestral 
and band studies. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Rochut, Melodious Studies Vol. Ill; Blume Stud- 
ies, Vol. Ill; Blazhevich, Seventy Etudes; Eby, 
Bass Studies; selected solos; orchestral studies. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Grigoriev, Tuba Studies, Bernard, Etudes and 
Exercises for Tuba; transcriptions of horn and 
violoncello literature; solos by Cimera, Barat, 
Schroen; orchestral literature. 

Viola 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves, selected 
scales in thirds, sixths and octaves, Flesch, Scale 
Studies; Sevcik, Studies (Lifschey); Campagnoli, 
Forty-one Caprices, Fuchs, Twelve Caprices, 
Enesco, Concert Piece. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each 

All major and minor scales and arpeggios, scales in 
octaves, thirds, sixths, and tenths. Selected studies 
from Rode, Caprices; Hermann, Sox Concert 
Studies Op. 18. Concertos by C.P.E. Bach, and 
Hoffmeister; Vaughan-Williams, Suite; Sonata by 
Milhaud; parts from orchestral and chamber 
music literature. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Continue scales and arpeggios. Selections from 
Rode, Caprices and Gavinies, Twenty-four Mati- 
nees. Sonatas by Brahms and Creston. Viola parts 
from orchestral and chamber music literature. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Selected Studies from Paganini, Caprices; Reger, 
Three Suites; Bach, unaccompanied violin or vio- 
loncello works transcribed for viola; Bloch, Suite 
for Viola; concertos by Bartok, Walton, Porter. 



Violin 

103, 104. 3 cr. eachi 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves; scales in 
thirds, sixths, octaves, tenths, harmonics; Fiorillo 
or Kreutzer; concertos by Bach, Mozart, 
Vieuxtemps, Wieniawski, Bruch, Lalo; short 
pieces from the romantic period. 

203, 204. 3 cr. eacW 

Continued study of repertoire listed above; Kreut- 
zer or Rode. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios continued; Rode or Gavinies; 
Bach Solo Sonatas and Partitias; any of the major 
sonatas and concertos (Beethoven, Brahms, Men- 
delssohn, Bartok, Siberlius, Tschaikovsky). 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios continued; Dont Op. 35 or 
Paganini Caprices; continue solo Bach and study 
of major concertos and sonatas. 

Violoncello 

103, 104. 3 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves with varied 
bowings. Duport Studies; Franchomme, Twelve 
Caprices. Sonatas of Veracini, Locatelli, and Boc- 
cherini. 

203, 204. 3 cr. each* 

Scales and arpeggios in four octaves with varied 
bowings, scales in thirds, sixths and octaves, chro- 
matic scales, and seventh chords. Franchomme. 
Twelve Caprices; Dupont, Etudes. Concertos by 
Romberg, Popper and Saint-Saens; sonatas by;' 
Boccherini and Haydn. Orchestral studies. Con-! 
temporary works. 

303, 304. 3 cr. each' 

Continue scales, etudes by Servais and Piatti, Con- 
certos by Davidoff, Dohnanyi, Lalo; Boellmann. 
Symphonic Variations; six solo sonatas of Bach. 
Orchestral Studies. Contemporary works. 

403, 404. 3 cr. each 

Etudes by Servais, Piatti and Popper. Concertos by 
Haydn. Boccherini, Elgar, Barber; Schubert. 
Arpeggione Sonata. Contemporary solos and sona- 
tas. Orchestral studies and chamber music litera- 
ture. 

Voice 

103, 104. 2-3 cr. each 

Technical exercises to fit the needs of the student. 
Literature from all periods to fit the needs of the 
student. 

203, 204. 2-3 cr. each| 

Continuation of technical exercises. More chal- 
lenging repertoire from all periods. 

303, 304. 2-3 cr. each 

Continuation of technical exercises. Opera andi 
oratorio repertoire emphasized in addition to 
more advanced concert repertoire and including) 
contemporary theater repertorie. 



403, 404. 2-3 cr. each 

Continuation of technical exercises. All students 
should have at least one complete oratorio and 
one complete opera role ready for performance 
before graduation. The student's repertoire should 
contain representative songs in Italian, French, 
German, and English, including significant exam- 
ples of contemporary vocal literature. The stu- 
dent's senior recital should include examples from 
all of these. 

349, 350, 449, 450. 

Vocal Repertoire. 2 cr. each 

Study and performance of vocal solo and ensem- 
ble literature. Four semesters encompass Italian, 
German, French, and English music, with concen- 
tration on one category each semester. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Bassoon 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

All scales and arpeggios; Weisenborn Op. 8 Vol. I; 
Milde Studies; Galliard, 6 Sonatas for Bassoon. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Continue scales and arpeggios with various articu- 
lations; Weissenborn Op. 8 Vol. II; continue Milde 
Studies; Kovar Studies; Weinberger, Sonatine. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Milde, Studies in all Keys; Jancourt, Grand 
Method Book II; Kavor Studies; solos by Marcello 
and Cools; orchestral studies. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Selected studies from Milde, Concert Studies Vol. 
1; Telemann, Sonata; orchestral studies. 

Clarinet 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios: Klose, Celebrated Method 
for Clarinet, Part II; Baerman, Method Book II; 
selected solos. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Continue scales and arpeggios in various articula- 
tions; continue Klose Method; Rose, 32 Studies 
for Clarinet; Voxman, Duets; selected solos. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Langenus, Scale Studies; continue Rose, 32 stud- 
ies; Klose, 20 Characteristic Studies, Weber, Fan- 
tasy and Rondo; orchestral and band studies. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Continue Langenus, Scale Studies; Rose, 42 Stud- 
ies; Polatchak, 12 Etudes for Clarinet, Mozart, 
Concerto in A; solos by Jeanjean; contemporary 
solos; orchestral studies. 

Double Bass 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

All positions up to thumb position; scales and 
intervals in all keys; Simandl, New Method for the 
Double Bass. 



99 



201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Scales continued including thumb positions; 
Simandl Method continued; selected pieces. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Scales and intervals continued, Simandl Method 
completed; Simandl, Thirty Etudes; selected 
pieces, violoncello sonatas by Marcello and others; 
orchestral studies. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Simandl, Thirty Etudes; selected studies from 
Hrable, Eighty-six Etudes; pieces by Koussevitsky 
and others; orchestral studies. 

Flute 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Kohler, Etudes Book I; Terschak Studies; Drouet, 
25 Celebrated Etudes; M. Moyse, selected etudes; 
scales and arpeggios in all keys; selected solos; 
Sonatas by Marcello, Handel, Blavet, and 
Telemann. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Continue scales and arpeggios; Drouet, 25 Cele- 
brated Etudes; Anderson, Etudes Op. 37 selected 
solos from 19th century composers; Sonatas of 
Baroque composers. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Anderson Etudes, Op. 33 and Op. 21; Berbiquier, 
Studies; Taffanel-Gaubert, Daily Studies; all scales 
and arpeggios in various ariculations; pieces by 
Anderson, Widor, Quantz; Handel sonatas. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Anderson, Etudes Op. 30; Taffanel-Gaubert Scales, 
scales in thirds and in sixths, chromatic scales, 
arpeggios and trills; sonatas by Handel, Telemann 
and Blavet; representative contemporary pieces, 
and Paris conservatory solos. 

Guitar — Classical 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Evaluation of student's abilities and basic correc- 
tions if necessary. Scales, major and minor up to 
four sharps and flats; Carcassi Method; selected 
studies from Carcassi Twenty-Five Etudes Op. 60; 
Renaissance dances; works by Carulli, Aguado, 
Sor. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

All scales major and minor, two and three octaves; 
Henze Method; Sor Concert Etudes; One suite and 
selected pieces from the Renaissance and Baroque; 
works by Luis Milan. Tarrega, Ponce, and Villa- 
Lobos. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Continuation of technical studies of the first two 
years; lute music transcribed for guitar; Dowland, 
Bach, Sor Concert Etudes and Sonatas; chamber 
ensembel works by Boccherini, Schubert, 
Scheidler, Ibert, Paganini. 



100 



401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Bach suite, a sonata or suite by a 20th-century 
composer; concerto by Vivaldi, Giuliani, Carulli, 
or by a 20th-century composer. 

Guitar — Jazz 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Evaluation of student's abilities; basic technique 
and reading abilities including reading knowledge 
through VII positions, all major scales in all posi- 
tions; Berklee Method Book I and Melodic 
Rhythm Studies Book by William G. Leavitt; 
basic chord theory, basic position folk chords and 
alterations, all barre chords, and a working knowl- 
edge of basic jazz chord forms; beginning study of 
chord-melody solo playing and single-note tech- 
niques; standard guitar solos. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Continue single-note technique, chord studies; all 
major and minor scales; continue chord-melody 
playing; Joe Pass Guitar Style, Improvised Chord 
Solos, and Single Note Improvised Solos Books; 
intensive rhythm jazz chord studies (may use 
Bucky Pizzarelli's A Touch of Glass or Ronny 
Lee's Jazz Guitar Method Bk. II); intensive chord- 
melody playing, including arrangements done by 
the student; beginning single-note improvisation; 
standard guitar repertoire; Berklee Method Book I. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Continue rhythm playing studies, chord-melody 
playing and single-note improvisation studies; 
Berklee Method Book III; Chord-soloing and 
development of repertoire, including solos by 
George M. Smith, Eddie Lang, Dick McDonough, 
Carl Kress, Johnny Smith, Tony Mottola, George 
Van Eps; Single-string studies: Bach inventions, 
Kreutzer violin studies, Paganini violin studies 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Intensive single-note improvisation and improvi- 
sational lines; REH Publications for single-note 
study (Diorio, Carlson, Mock, Kato, Hutchinson, 
Joe Pass' Jazz Solos and Jazz Classics); Charlie 
Christian Studies, Howard Roberts' Method and 
Materials; Wes Montgomery's Octave-Style Play- 
ing; understanding "fusion" music, chord-melody 
arranging from traditional and contemporary liter- 
ature; record transcription both already existing 
and ones done by the student (Coryell, Pass 
Barnes, Burrell, Roberts, DeMeola, Benson and 
others.) 

Harp 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Lariviere Exercises and technical studies. Standard 
orchestra parts. Bochsa Etudes opus 318, Book II. 
Pieces grade of difficulty of: Grandjany, Aria in 
Classic style; Tournier, Images (Suite I); Saint- 
Saens, Fantasie. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Technical studies, Bochsa Etudes; opus 62. Stan- 
dard orchestra cadenzas. Pieces grade of difficulty 



of; Tournier, Feerie; Rousseau, Variations Pasto- 
rales; Grandjany, Fantasie on a Theme of Haydn. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Technical studies. Orchestra parts. Bochsa Etudes, 
Opus 34, Pieces grade of difficulty of: Hindemith, 
Sonata; Handel, Concerto in Bb major; Ravel, 
Introduction and Allegro. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Technical studies, Pieces grade of difficulty of: 
Faure, Impromptu; C.P.E. Bach, Sonata; Salzedo, 
Scintillation; Debussy, Danses Sacre et Profane. 

Horn 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Fundamentals of tone production; major scales 
and arpeggios; chromatic scales; ability to read in 
at least two clefs; selected etudes from Schantl, 
Kopprasch; selected solos. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Extension of range in all keys and articulations; I 
prepatory trill and multiple tonguing studies; Kop- 1 
prasch, Mueller, and Alphonse etudes; selected 
solos from F. Strauss, Haydn, and Mozart. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Continuing work on fundamentals; ability to play 
in all clefs; Mueller, Kling, and Alphonse, etudes; 
selected solos from Mozart, R. Strauss, and Bach; 
orchestral studies. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Continuing work in fundamentals: selected etudes 
and solos including contemporary works; major 
chamber music works, orchestral studies. 

Oboe 

101, 102. 2 cr. each, 

Review of previous work by student and correc- ; 
tive exercises as necessary; scales and arpeggios; 
Barret, Exercises in Articulation and Progressive | 
Melodies; selected solos; reed making. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in all keys; continue Barret; 
selected studies from Bleuzet. Technique of the 
Oboe Vol. I; solos by Handel and Schumann; reed 
making. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Barret, progressive Exercises, Bleuzet, technique 
of the Oboe Vol. II; continue scales and arpeggios 
in various articulations; Handel sonatas; orches- 
tral studies; contemporary solos; reed making. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Barret, Etudes; selected etudes by Ferling; con- 
tinue scales and arpeggios; solos by Bach and Han- 
del; contemporary solos. 

Organ 

101, 201. 2 cr. each 

Gleason, Method of Organ Playing; Stanley, 
Voluntaries; Franck, l'Organist; Vierne, 24 Pieces; 
Dupre, Chorale Preludes; Selected works from the 



101 



early Italian, German, and French schools. Bach, 
Orgelbuchlein selections; 8 short Preludes and 
Fugues and selected preludes and fugues. Organ 
Class I: pedal scales in all major keys, pedals 
alone; hymn playing; introduction to figured bass 
and harmonization of simple melodies. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Selected works by Brahms, Mendelssohn; Joseph 
Wilcox Jenkins. Six Pieces; Dupre, Antiphons; 
Messiaen, Le Banquet Celeste of Ascension Suite, 
mvts. 1 or 4; Langlais; Franch; selected works by 
contemporary composers; Bach; Orgelbuchlein; 
Schubler Chorales, selected preludes and figures. 
Organ Class II: pedal scales hands and feet in all 
major and minor keys; hymn playing; modula- 
tions; transposition; score reading; continued har- 
monizations of melodies. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Selected works by D'Aquin, Clerambault; Swee- 
linck, Franck; Langlais; Messiaen; Bach, preludes 
and fugues, trio sonatas; Orgelbuchlein; Great 18 
Chorales; works by contemporary composers. 
Organ Class III: Continuation of pedal scales; 
hymn playing; score reading; transpositions; fig- 
ured bass; counterpoint accompaniments of 
anthems and canticles. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Selected works by Franck, Langlais, Tournemire, 
Vierne, Alain, and other contemporary compos- 
ers. Bach, preludes and fugues, partitas, 
Clavierubung Part III selections. Organ Class IV: 
pedal scales; free hymn accompaniments, anthem 
accompaniments and conducting from the con- 
sole. 

Percussion 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Rudimentary snare drum technique, analysis of 
existing methods. Elementary tympani technique, 
uses of tympani in classical literature, tuning. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Intermediate snare drum studies, elementary xylo- 
phone technique. Intermediate tympani studies, 
orchestral literature Beethoven to Wagner. Per- 
formance techniques of most commonly used 
equipment. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Use of tympani and percussion in late 19th and 
20th century literature. Orchestral studies in all 
instruments. Examination of percussion ensemble 
materials; group instruction methods. Selection 
and care of instruments for professional and 
school use. Extension of mallet study. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Deployment of instruments in band and orchestra 
settings, conducting the percussion ensemble. 
Review of teaching methods in basic techniques, 
the role of the percussion clinician. Problems in 
writing and scoring for percussion, discussion of 



available materials and sources for solo perform- 
ances. 

Piano 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Bach, two part inventions, short preludes and 
fugues; easier sonatas of Haydn and Mozart; Bee- 
thoven^ Rondo in C; easier nocturnes and mazur- 
kas of Chopin. Major scales M.M quarter note 
equals 96; diminished seventh arpeggios M.M. 
quarter note equals 88. All scales and arpeggios in 
triplet and quadruplet rhythms. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Bach, two and three part inventions; sonatas of 
Haydn and Mozart; easier sonatas of Beethoven; 
nocturnes and waltzes of Chopin; Schumann Op. 
15; Scales: Major and Minor M.M. quarter note 
equals 104. Dominant and diminished seventh 
arpeggios M.M. quarter note equals 96. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Bach, selected preludes and fugues from Well- 
Tempered Clavier; Beethoven, Op. 10 and Op. 14 
sonatas; Chopin, Preludes and Nocturnes; selec- 
tions from Impressionistic and Contemporary rep- 
ertoire. Continuation of major and minor scales; 
dominant and diminished seventh, and major 
arpeggios. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Bach, French Suites, selected preludes and fugues; 
Beethoven, Op. 2 No. 2 and 3, Op. 28, Op. 31; 
Preludes and Impromptus of Chopin; Brahms, 
Intermezzi; selections from Contemporary reper- 
toire. Continue scales; dominant and diminished 
seventh, and major and minor arpeggios. 

Saxophone 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

All major and minor scales and arpeggios; Univer- 
sal Method for Saxophone or equivalent material; 
Bassi-Iasilli, Concert Etudes; selected solos. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Continue scales and arpeggios with various articu- 
lations; Bassi-Iasilli, Concert Etudes; selected 
solos. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Mule, Scales and Arpeggios; Gatti-Iasilli, 35 Melo- 
dious Technical Exercises; pieces by Faure and 
Jeanjean. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Mule, Scales and Arpeggios; Gatti-Iasilli, 35 Melo- 
dious Technical Exercises; Labanchi-Iasilli, 33 
Concert Etudes; Premier Solo de concours by 
Pares; Mortiz, Sonata for Saxophone; representa- 
tive contemporary solos. 

Trombone and Euphonium 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Fundamentals of tone production, embouchure 
development, breath support and attack, work in 
elementary Legato style. Arban, Method for 



102 



Trombone; major and minor scales through two 
octaves; selected solos. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

All scales and arpeggios; continue drills and 
Arban, Method for Trombone; selected studies 
from Cimera, 1 70 Etudes; Study of single, double 
and triple tonguing. Pryor solos and other selected 
materials; band and orchestral studies. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Continue technical exercises; Stacey, Lip Flexibil- 
ity; Rochut, Melodious Etudes Book I-II, Blume, 
Studies Book I; La Fosse, Sight Reading Studies; 
study of tenor clef; Croce-Spinelli, Solo de Con- 
cours; Alary, Contest Pieces; Morel, Piece in F 
minor. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Continue technical exercises; Stacey, Lip Flexibil- 
ity; Kopprasch, Book I-II; Rochut, Melodious 
Etudes Book III; Blazhevich, Clef Studies; study of 
bass trombone; Guilmant, Morceau Sympho- 
nique; Cimera, Valse Petite; Ropartz, Andante 
and Allegro. 

Trumpet 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Major and minor scales and arpeggios; Schloss- 
berg, Daily Drills; Clark, Technical Studies; 
Arban, Complete Method; Voxman, Selected 
Studies; Balay, Petite Piece Concertante; Fitzger- 
ald, English Suite. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Continued study of major and minor scales and 
arpeggios; Continued Schlossberg and Clark; 
Bousquet, 36 Celebrated Studies; E. Gates, Odd 
Meter Etudes; Concone, Lyrical Studies; Fiocco/ 
Owen, Arioso; Ropartz, Andante and Allegro. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Continued scales in rhythmic and articulation pat- 
terns; Continued Schlossberg, and Clark; 
Goldman, Practical Studies; Clark, Characteristic 
Studies; Goedicke, Concert Etude; Gibbons/Cruft, 
Suite. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Major and minor scales in diatonic patterns; Con- 
tinued Schlossberg and Clark; P.M. Dubois, 12 
Etudes variees; Glantz, The Complete Harry 
Glantz; W. Hartley, Sonatina; E. Bozza, Badinage; 
Webber, Suite in F Major. 

Tuba 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

All scales and arpeggios; Arban, Method for Trom- 
bone and Baritone; selected solo material. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

All scales and arpeggios with various articulations; 
continue Arban; Bell, Foundations of Tuba and 
Sousaphone Playing; selected solos. 



301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Continue scales and arpeggios; chromatic scales; 
Bell, Foundations of Tuba and Sousaphone Play- 
ing; Vandercook, Etudes; Rochut, Melodious 
Etudes Book I; Blume Studies Book I; Tyrrell, 
Advanced Studies for the BB flat Tuba; selected 
solos; band and orchestra studies. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Rochut, Melodious Etudes Book II; Blume Studies 
Book II; Blazhevich, Etudes for The BB flat Bass; 
band and orchestra studies. 

Violin 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves; scales in 
thirds, sixths, octaves (Flesch); Dont, Schradieck, 
Mazas, or Kreutzer; Baroque period concertos and 
sonatas, concertos Bach and Mozart. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios continued; Fiorillo or Kreut- 
zer; concertos of Bach, DeBeriot, Mozart, Rode, 
and Viotti. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios continued; Kreutzer or Rode; 
short pieces of the Romantic period; standard con- 
certos and sonatas. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios continued; Rode or Gavinies; 
short pieces of the Romantic period; standard con- 
certos and sonatas. 

Viola 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves; Sevcik Stud- 
ies (Lifschey); Hermann, Technical Studies; 
Telemann, Concerto in G; Klengel, Album of 
Classical Pieces. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Continue scales and Sevcik Studies; selected stud- 
ies from Kreutzer, 42 Etudes; Stamitz, Concerto in 
D; Bruch, Romance. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Continue scales and arpeggios; scales in thirds, 
sixths and octaves; Palachko, 20 Etudes; Fiorillo, 
selected studies from 36 Etudes; Bach, Three viola 
de gamba sonatas adapted for viola. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios continued; selected studies 
from Campagnoli, 41 Caprices; Concerto in B 
minor by Handel-Casadesus; Hindemith, Music of 
Mourning; selected contemporary solos; viola 
parts from orchestral and chamber music litera- 
ture. 

Violoncello 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves; 
Franchomme, 12 Studies; sonatas by Handel, 
Corelli; Concertos by Goltermann and Romberg. 



103 



201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios continued; Duport Etudes; 
Galeotti, Sonata No. 2; Marais Suite; Romberg 
Concerto in D minor. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios continued; Duport Etudes; 
Grutzmacher Etudes; sonatas by Grazioli, Sam- 
martini; Goltermann Concerto No. 1. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Scales and arpeggios as before but including thirds, 
sixths and octaves. Duport Studies; selected stud- 
ies from Franchomme, 12 Caprices; Concerto No. 
2 Romberg; Sonatas by Nardini and Sammartini; 
orchestral studies. 

Voice 

101, 102. 2 cr. each 

Technical exercises to fit the needs of the student. 
Literature from all periods to fit the vocal needs of 
the student. 

201, 202. 2 cr. each 

Continuation of technical exercises. More chal- 
lenging repertoire from all periods. 

301, 302. 2 cr. each 

Continuation of technical exercises. Opera and 
oratorio repertoire included when vocally suitable 
in addition to concert repertoire. 

401, 402. 2 cr. each 

Continuation of technical exercises. More 
advanced opera, oratorio, and concert repertoire 
and contemporary theater literature. 

CONDUCTING 



379, 380. Conducting I, II. 2 cr. each 

This course provides a study of the fundamentals 
of conducting as a performing skill, teaching tech- 
nique, and as an interpretive art. Use of the baton, 
choral and instrumental rehearsal techniques, and 
score reading. Two hours a week. 

327. Jazz Pedagogy & Directing. 2 cr. each 

Methods and materials pertinent to rehearsing and 
conducting jazz ensembles, studio orchestras and 
theater orchestras with an emphasis on conducting 
as a performing skill as well as an interpretive art. 

ENSEMBLE 

Required for all students as laboratory work dur- 
ing each semester of full-time enrollment. Non- 
music majors are invited to register for ensemble 
with permission of instructor. 

Major Ensembles 0-1 cr. each 

Voice, Piano, and Organ Majors will participate in 
a choral ensemble for each semester of enrollment. 
Instrumental Majors will participate in Band or 
Orchestra for each semester of enrollment. 



Instrumentalists are encouraged to take advan- 
tage of opportunities to participate in choir; key- 
board or voice majors are likewise encouraged to 
gain experience in one of the instrumental ensem- 
bles. 

Small Ensembles. 0-1 cr. each 

The Small or Minor Ensembles include Brass 
Ensemble. Guitar Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Per- 
cussion Ensemble, String Orchestra, Tamburitza 
Ensemble, and Woodwind Ensemble. See cata- 
logues. 

115. Opera Coaching. 1 cr. each 

Individual work with pianist as a supplement to 
opera workship. 

116. Opera Workshop. 0-1 cr. each 

A performing class in which students learn stan- 
dard and other opera repertory in English and the 
original languages. 

141. Chamber Music. 2 cr. each 

Study and performance of all types of chamber 
music for the various instrumental combinations. 

248-249. Percussion Ensemble. 0-1 cr. each 

Meets on Fridays, 1:15-3:05 pm. Required of all 
Percussion Majors. The objective is to perform 
works of varying styles and levels of difficulty in a 
very professional manner. Members will have an 
opportunity to perform in the various percussion 
groups. The ensemble performs at least one recital 
each semester. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

189, 190, 289, 290, 389, 390. Music 

Field Observation. cr. 

Music education majors are required to complete 
six field observations per year. The observations 
are not credit bearing, but are preparation for stu- 
dent teaching. Each student must register for field 
observation every semester (except senior year) in 
order to fulfill the pre-requisite for student teach- 
ing. 

181. Woodwind Class. 2 cr. 

Performance technique on clarinet. Teaching tech- 
nique of oboe, bassoon and saxophone covered. 
Two hours a week. 

185. Vocal Methods I. 2 cr. 

Fundamentals of vocal production including pos- 
ture, breath control, placement, diction interpreta- 
tion. Voice classifications, ranges and a sampling 
of art songs and operatic repertoire will be cov- 
ered. For potential teachers and music therapists. 
Two hours per week. 

186. Vocal Methods II. 2 cr. 

Instructional methods for the elementary class- 
room K-6, including development of the child 
voice, song materials, pedagogy, lesson planning 
and curriculum sequencing. Two hours per week. 
Prerequisite: Vocal Methods I 185 



104 



220, 221. Voice Class. 1 cr. each 

Fundamentals of voice production including 
placement, breathing, breath control, study of 
vowels and consonants, posture, elementary song 
materials, interval and scale drill, sight singing. 
Proper stage presence for recitals and concerts and 
comportment in the classroom will be empha- 
sized. 

113, 114, 213, 214. Piano Class. 2 cr. each 

The development of functional keyboard skills in 
sight reading, transposition, harmonization of 
melodies, and improvisation of accompaniments. 
Required of all Music Education students. 

115, 116, 215, 216. Conservatory 

Piano Class. 1 cr. each 

The development of functional keyboard skills in 
sight reading, transposition, harmonization of 
melodies, and improvisation of accompaniments. 

117. Piano Class for Organists. 1 cr. 

Organ majors study the development of functional 
keyboard skills in sight reading, transposition, 
accompaniments and techniques 1 hr. per week. 

281. Brass Class. 2 cr. 

Performance technique on trumpet. Teaching 
technique of French horn, trombone, baritone, 
and tuba. Two hours a week. 

381. String Class. 2 cr. 

Fundamental principles and techniques of playing 
and teaching the violin, viola, cello, and bass. 
Bowing, positions, vibrato, and an examination of 
class methods and materials are presented. Two 
hours a week. 

383. Elementary Methods. 2 cr. 

Philosophy and pedagogy of music in the context 
of the elementary general music class. The princi- 
ples of Kodaly, Dalcroze and Orffare incorporated 
with field observations, in-class demonstrations, 
research assignments and active student participa- 
tion to develop required competencies for teaching 
on the elementary level. Two hours per week. Pre- 
requisite: Vocal Methods 185 and 186. 

384. Secondary Methods. 2 cr. 

Principles, practices, and materials for the general 
music program in the secondary schools including 
voice classification; the organization of ensemble 
activites; concerts; assembly programs; and the 
relationship of the school to the community. Two 
hours a week. 

385. Choral Methods. 2 cr. 

This course deals with all aspects of choral singing 
and their application to school music programs. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of per- 
formance ensembles, rehearsal techniques, special 
choral problems, planning musical productions 
and practical work in choral conducting and 
arranging. Includes principles, practices, materials, 
and an overview of current teaching strategies and 



curriculum trends as applied to the total music 
program of the secondary school. Offered Spring 
Semester only. 

387. Marching Band Methods. 2 en 

Principles, practices, and materials for the march- 
ing band, including its role in the total music pro- 
gram; organization and maintenance; planning 
and executing of the field show; basic maneuver' 
and rehearsal procedures. 

481. Percussion Class Methods. 2 cr 

Fundamental principles and techniques of playing 
and teaching the percussion instruments of th< 
band and orchestra with special emphasis on the 
snare drum. Two hours a week. 

490. Student Teaching. 12 cr 

Practice teaching in approved elementary and sec : 
ondary schools under the guidance of a critic 
teacher and the college supervisor. Note: Before < 
student will be permitted to begin Student Teach 
ing, all field observations and methods classe: 
including instrumental classes, piano, woodwinds 
brass, strings, and voice must be satisfactorily 
completed. Percussion, elementary and secondary 
methods must be taken in the same semester a: 
student teaching. Students will receive completi 
instructions, together with lists of materials, whei 
they enroll in the Music Education program. Prac 
tical techniques to aid students in fulfilling th< 
requirements will be explored in various method 
classes. 



MUSIC HISTORY, LITERATURE AND ART 



251, 252, 351, 352. History and 

Literature of Music. 2 cr. eacl 

An historical survey of the ideas and cultura 
achievements of Western man in the context o 
the political and sociological developments t( 
which the art of music is bound. The survey 
embraces four semesters which are arrangec 
chronologically. These courses seek to provide ; 
broad historical frame of reference within whicl 
the relationship of music to the development o 
man's thought can be clearly seen, along with < 
survey and analysis of representative literature. 

451, 452. Organ Literature. 2 cr. eacl 

A survey of organ literature and organ building a: 
it relates to organ registration. The first semste 
treats organ music from the Renaissance througl 
J. S. Bach. The second semester deals with th< 
literature from 1750 to the present. Outside listen 
ing and readings will be required. 

151. Evolution of Jazz Styles I. 2 cr 

A study of the origin, development and styles o 
jazz music and its ramifications with an emphasi; 
on recorded music as well as scores. 



105 



152. Evolution of Jazz Styles II. 2 cr. 

A study and analysis of recorded improvised solos 
by major jazz artists from 1940 to the present. 

MUSIC THEORY, MUSICIANSHIP, COM- 
POSITION, EURHYTHMICS 

The Theory Department recognizes the individual 
differences of students and provides an opportu- 
nity for them to advance according to their abili- 
ties. 

121, 122. Dalcroze Eurhythmies. 2 cr. each 

Experiencing, analyzing and creatively manipulat- 
ing the materials of music through rhythmic 
movement. Two hours per week. 

010. Fundamentals of Musicianship. 1 cr. 

The purpose of this course is to introduce students 
to sightsinging and musical dictation using the 
Moveable system of solfeggio. The course is 
designed for prospective music majors and non- 
majors and is a preparatory course for Musician 
ship I. 

Students enrolled in Fundamentals of Musician- 
ship and/or Fundamentals of Theory must suc- 
cessfully complete these courses before enrolling 
in Eurhythmies, Theory I, or Musicianship I. 

Oil. Fundamentals of Music Theory. 1 cr. each 

Students will learn to read clefs, name intervals, 
spell scales in major and minor keys, key signa- 
tures, identify triads, and begin four-part writing. 
This is a prepatory course for theory 131. One 
hour per week. 

131, 132. Theory. 2 cr. each 

This course is designed to acquaint the student 
with the materials of musical composition using 
diatonic harmony. Opportunities for the student 
to do creative work are provided. Two hours a 
week. 

133, 134. Musicianship. 2 cr. each 

The goals of the course are to develop good into- 
nation and the ability to sight sing, the ability to 
identify and notate melodies, rhythms, chords, 
and complete compositions, and to develop inner 
hearing and memory. The course uses the movea- 
ble Do system, based on the Kodaly method. Two 
hours a week. 

231, 232. Theory. 2 cr. each 

A continuation of 132 introducing chromatic har- 
mony and the basic principles of contrapuntal 
writing. Creative opportunities continued. Three 
hours a week. 

233, 234. Musicianship. 2 cr. each 

A continuation of 134. Two hours a week. 

335. Counterpoint I. 2 cr. 

The course is devoted to a study of the polyphonic 
technique of the sixteenth century. 

336. Counterpoint II. 2 cr. 

A course study concerned with the harmonic con- 
trapuntal technique of the period of J. S. Bach. 



340. Orchestration. 2 cr. 

A study of the basic problems of scoring for indi- 
vidual instruments, particularly orchestral choirs, 
the entire orchestra, and unique instrumental 
combinations. Analysis of the techniques of 
orchestration of selected composers of the 18th, 
19th, and 20th centuries. 

JAZZ STUDIES 



118, 119, 218, 219. Jazz Piano Class. 2 cr. 

This course is designed to give the college student 
a thorough understanding of Jazz Chords and Har- 
mony. The student will study a wide range of Jazz 
Chords, Jazz Chord Progressions, and learn to 
incorporate them into tunes. Major and Minor 
Scales will be studied in these sessions as well as 
famous Jazz Piano Arrangements. 

430. Jazz Arranging. 2 cr. 

A study of the basic techniques of scoring for indi- 
vidual instruments and jazz ensembles of various 
sizes, from small groups to studio orchestras. 
Analysis of scores by contemporary big band 
arrangers. 

440. Advanced Jazz Arranging. 2 cr. 

Advanced arranging techniques for the jazz and 
studio ensembles. 

138, 139. Composition. 2 cr. each 

The study of writing of musical composition in the 
smaller forms. 

238, 239. Composition. 2 cr. each 

These courses are offered in order to provide gifted 
young composers an opportunity to receive gui- 
dance in the development of advanced composi- 
tional techniques. Permission of the chairman of 
the Theory Department is required. 

226. Jazz Improvisation I. 2 cr. 

Beginning study and practice of melodic improvi- 
sation; conventional forms and chord progres- 
sions, employing idiomatic jazz and articulations, 
major-minor and modal scales. 

227. Jazz Improvisation II. 2 cr. 

A continuation of 226 with an introduction to 
altered scales and chords. 

426. Jazz Improvisation III. 2 cr. 

A continuation of 227 with an emphasis on chro- 
matically altered scales, chords, and extended 
forms. 

427. Jazz Improvisation IV. 2 cr. 

Extension and continuation of 426 with an 
emphasis on the practical application of advanced 
techniques to standard and jazz literature. 

453. Jazz Composition I. 2 cr. 

A study of advanced compositional techniques as 
applied to contemporary jazz styles. Analysis of 
jazz compositions from 1940 to the present. 



106 



454. Jazz Composition II. 2 cr. 

A continuation of 453 with emphasis on individ- 
ual style development. 

333. Ear Training for Jazz Musicians. cr. 

The course is designed to train the student to rec- 
ognize aurally the melodic, rhythmic and har- 
monic elements of contemporary jazz. The devices 
used are sight-singing, keyboard work and exten- 
sive dictation. Emphasis is placed on four, five 
and six-note chords, chromatically altered chords 
and polychords. 

141. Chamber Music Jazz. 

The purpose of this course is to develop the skills 
and techniques necessary for small jazz ensemble 
performance. Emphasis is on rhythm section tech- 
niques, interaction among the members of the 
group, and development of repertoire. 

MUSIC THERAPY 



107. Music Therapy Orientation. 3 cr. 

An introduction to Music Therapy as practiced in 
a variety of rehabilitation settings. Observations 
followed by informal group discussions. Basic the- 
ory about the validity of music as therapy; the 
relationship of theory to practice. Intensive class 
participation will be required to prove qualifica- 
tion for further, in-depth study of the profession. 

108. Music in Therapy. 3 cr. 

An exposure to music therapy techniques used in 
working with handicapped children and adults. 
Applications to current Practicum work will be 
emphasized. Prerequisite: Music Therapy Orienta- 
tion 107. 

307. Psychology of Music. 3 cr. 

An exploration of musical behaviors, and to a 
lesser degree, all other art behaviors of a variety of 
cultures and sub-cultures, beginning with the stu- 
dent's personal experience. Extensive class partici- 
pation will be expected. Prerequisite: Introduction 
to Psychology. 

308. Influence of Music on Behavior. 2 cr. 

Reviews different treatment theories and their 
relationship to music therapy. Emphasizes the 
effects of music on behavior and total health. 
Develops a philosophy of music therapy with a 
background in holistic health. 

309. Directed Study in Music Therapy. 2 cr. 

Study topics from areas of music therapy, psychol- 
ogy of music, brain research and other expressive 
therapies are reviewed and discussed. 

310. Recreational Instruments. 1 cr. 

Stresses a typical and functional uses of guitar, and 
covers other musical instruments and devices for 
recreational purposes. No Specific text used. Each 
student required to have a guitar and harmonica. 



315. Piano Improvisation for 

Music Therapy. 2 cr. 

Development of functional keyboard skills in 
improvisation on rhythm and dissonant chords as 
an aid in non-verbal communication with the 
handicapped client. 

124. Music Therapy Practicum 

and Internship. 1 cr. each 

Each practicum is a field placement in a clinical 
setting for a minimum of one hour per week for 
12-15 weeks per semester. Students are placed 
with music therapists who practice in a variety of 
clinical settings, or with staff who can provide a 
structured therapeutic program. Attendance at 
four monthly seminars per semester is required. A 
six month internship is the culminating experience 
of this 7 credit unit. 

SACRED MUSIC 



209. Children's Choirs. 1 cr. 

Materials and techniques used in dealing with 
children's choirs. 

431, 432. Improvisation. 2 cr. each 

A practical application of the basic tools of 
improvisation including harmonization of melo- 
dies at the organ, two and three part counterpoint, 
short ABA forms and chorale preludes with 
emphasis on their liturgical application. 

478, 479. Choral Conducting 

and Methods. 1 cr. each 

Development of conducting technique. The study, 
rehearsal and class performance of choral works in 
various styles. 

407, 408. Church Music Practicum. 2 cr. 

Seminar in practical aspects of church music; 
establishing the music program in a church; 
graded choir systems; children's choirs; instru- 
ments in workshop; contracts; cantor systems; 
worship commissions, etc. 

421. Gregorian Chant. 2 cr. 

The history, notation and modal system of Grego- 
rian chant. Class participation in the singing of 
chant. Chant as prayer and current liturgical appli- 
cation. 

420. Hymnody. 2 cr. 

A study of the church's heritage of song; the 
psalms; the great hymns of the Medieval Church; 
the heritage of Luther, Calvin and their followers; 
English hymnody; American contributions; twen- 
tieth-century humnody with special emphasis on 
the theological framework for each major develop- 
ment in the history of hymns. 

476. Organ Design and Maintenance. 2 cr. 

A study of the basic concepts of organ construc- 
tion with emphasis on the historical development 
of the organ and the mechanical operation of the 
pipes and console. Tuning, voicing, and esthetics 
of organ design will be discussed. 



107 



322. Sacred Choral and Solo Literature. 2 cr. 

A survey of choral and vocal literature for the 
church with emphasis on practical materials for 
church choirs, soloists and congregations. 

NON-MUSIC MAJORS 



161, 162. Introduction to 

Folk Dance. 2 cr. each 

The course introduces folk dance as a genre of 
movement, examining the types and styles of folk 
dance found among different nations and cultures 
of the world. In addition, it will familiarize the 
student with the varying types of music and 
rhythms used as dance accompaniment in differ- 
ent nations and cultures; and it will touch upon 
the related areas of folk instruments, folk singing 
styles, language, customs and folk costuming. 

255. Introduction to Balkan Music. 2 cr. 

An analytical study of the primitive and tradi- 
tional folk music of the Balkans, its musical styles, 
forms and characteristics in terms of its geographi- 
cal setting and historical background, and its gen- 
eral structure and aesthetics. 

256. Introduction to Balkan Dance. 2 cr. 

A survey of folk dances of the Balkan highlighting 
their development, form, indigenous characteris- 
tics, differences and similarities from one ethno- 
graphic region to another. 

147. Tamburitza Ensemble. 1 cr. 

The Tamburitza Ensemble involves the study and 
performance of music specifically composed and 



arranged for both small and large Tamburitza 
string ensembles. It encompasses the fundamental 
principles and techniques for both playing and 
teaching the Tamburitza and includes appropriate 
literature. 

149. Ballet. 2 cr. 

Fundamentals of ballet technique and practice, 
including barre and center floor work. 

151. Jazz Dance. 1 cr. 

Fundamentals of jazz dance styles and technique 
and practice. 

321. Music for the Classroom Teacher. 2 cr. 

The aim of this course is to assist the student in 
gaining an appreciation of the importance of 
music in the lives of children; a knowledge of fun- 
damental principles of instruction in music; and a 
familiarity with the variety of musically enriching 
experience. 

492. Development of the Creative 

Personality. 3 cr. 

This course encourages creative growth through 
the development and execution of individual and 
group projects in music, music education and 
music therapy. Limited enrollment with the con- 
sent of the instructor. Prerequisites: Introduction 
to Psychology and Educational Psychology. 

Descriptions of courses in English, modern lan- 
guages, psychology, sociology, and education, 
required in several curricula will be found in the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and School of 
Education sections of this Catalog. 




108 



School of Nursing 



HISTORY 

Since it is the policy of the University to establish 
its schools under control of an already established 
school, the School of Nursing was originally organ- 
ized in 1935 as a unit in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. On March 15, 1937, the Department 
of Nursing Education was given the status of a 
separate school with a Dean in charge. 

On December 3, 1937, the State Board of Educa- 
tion of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
approved the school and authorized Duquesne 
University to confer the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Nursing and the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing Education upon graduates 
according to the appropriate curriculum. Previ- 
ously, the School of Nursing offered two programs 
both leading to the degree of bachelor of Science of 
Nursing; however since 1964, both generic nursing 
students and registered nurse students enroll in the 
same program. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING PHILOSOPHY 
AND DEFINITION OF NURSING 

The philosophy of the School of Nursing evolves 
from that of Duquesne University. As such, it 
guides the development of a personal philosophy 
of life based on a Judeo-Christian frame of refer- 
ence and supports a commitment to the values 
which give meaning to life. 

The faculty believes that the academic discipline 
of nursing is a human science profession primarily 
concerned with the health care of man with fam- 
ily, evolving from conception through death. 
Nursing focuses on helping individuals and fami- 
lies to enhance the quality of living through the 
promotion of health. 

The nurse initiates interrelationships with fami- 
lies to help them describe their health, evaluate 
alternatives and mobilize their resources for plan- 
ning change. Central to nursing practice is the 
Nurse/Client/Family process which is deliberate, 
systematic, and individually designed. This is a 
shared process where decision-making is focused 
on freedom to choose within the limitations of 
situation while considering the safety of all 
concerned. 

The nurse uses theories, concepts and research 
findings to substantiate nursing practice. The pro- 
fessional nurse is a creative innovator who finds 
satisfaction in giving service to others, regularly 
evaluates self and plans for continuing self-growth. 
Through systematic inquiry, the professional 
nurse promotes the discipline of nursing and pro- 
vides direction for the future of nursing. 

The educational process is a co-constituted one 
in which teacher and learner plan experiences and 
share knowledge. The emergence of new knowl- 
edge is encouraged through the ongoing interroga- 
tion of present knowledge and new experience. 



This enhances the nurse's preparation for future 
and evolving responsibilities within professional 
nursing based on changes and characteristics of 
the population for whom health care will be 
delivered. 

In making explicit the philosophy that under- 
pins the theoretical framework of nursing, the con- 
cepts of man and health are studied in relation to 
nursing as a human science. Man is a sentient 
living unity, a creative act of God. Man and envi- 
ronment in their openness evolve unidirectionally. 

Existence with others in the world, co-existence, 
is recognized through patterns of expression. This 
existence is co-constituted; that is, man's relation- 
ship with the environment is participative. Within 
limitations of situation, man has the freedom to 
choose a way of being with the world, and in that 
choosing, gives meaning to a situation. 

Health is a process of being and becoming which 
is experienced by man. It is a personal process that 
affords each individual the potential for produc- 
tive and meaningful life that is congruent with 
individual belief systems and values which arise 
from a multicultural society. Every person has the 
freedom to choose changing dimensions of health 
and health values which emerge from ethnic and 
cultural customs and characteristics. Health is 
assessed by citizens and promoters of health care 
through a participative process which involves 
joint planning and decision-making. 

The faculty of the School of Nursing has defined 
nursing as an academic discipline that seeks to 
understand man as living health through the 
processes of life, caring, change, inquiry, and valu- 
ing. The practice of nursing applies knowledge and 
theories from this discipline and from the humani- 
ties and natural sciences in the promotion of 
health. Health promotion occurs through the utili- 
zation of the Nurse/Client/Family process as the 
nurse participates in care giving, health education 
and leadership. 

The uniqueness of the Duquesne University 
graduate is based on an appreciation and under- 
standing of the philosophy and the beliefs about 
man and health. These beliefs are reflected in nurs- 
ing practice through an approach that embraces 
man in his wholeness as one who continually 
moves forward, increasing in complexity through 
individual patterns of expression. The nursing 
practice of this graduate is also based on the recog- 
nition that the responsibility for the health situa- 
tion is a shared process in which the nurse, client, 
and family participate. 

The Duquesne University School of Nursing 
baccalaureate program graduates a generalist who 
has the flexibility to practice in a variety of set- 
tings. The program emphasizes nursing as a 



109 



human science and provides a foundation for 
graduate study. 

PROGRAM PURPOSES, GOAL AND 
INDICATORS 

The purposes of the program are: 

1. To prepare the graduate for beginning levels 
of professional nursing in a variety of settings. 

2. To provide the foundation for graduate edu- 
cation in nursing. 

The program goal is to practice nursing as a 
human science in a variety of settings. 

Within the philosophy and purposes of the 
School of Nursing, the faculty has formulated a 
curriculum that provides learning experiences to 
assist students to acquire specific knowledge and 
skills. The indicators of this program state that 
upon completion of the program, the graduate: 

1. Promotes the rights and dignity of man in 
health care. 

2. Initiates health care from the perspective of 
client's and family's belief about health. 

3. Engages client and family in a health care 
decision-making process relative to the man — 
environment inter-relationship. 

4. Evaluates nursing as a human science in pro- 
viding health care to clients and families and 
groups. 

5. Promotes professional standards of responsi- 
bility and accountability in nursing practice. 

6. Uses current research findings in providing a 
basis for change in nursing practice. 

7. Participates in studies/projects which 
enhance nursing practice. 

8. Enhances own effectiveness in nursing based 
on continuous self-evaluation. 

9. Synthesizes knowledge from related sciences 
and the humanities in the utilization of the nurs- 
ing process. 

10. Evaluates the values and goals of the nursing 
profession in light of the continued development 
of nursing. 

DEGREE 

The School of Nursing undergraduate program 
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The School of Nursing offers a program with a 
major in nursing leading to a bachelor's degree to 
qualified high school graduates, registered nurses, 
non-nursing baccalaureate graduates, and qualified 
transfer students. The program includes four years 
of study, and is designed to provide the student 
with the knowledge and the skills needed to prac- 
tice as a professional nurse generalist upon gradua- 
tion. The general and professional education 
acquired in this program provides a basis for the 



graduate to progress to positions of increasing 
responsibility and to undertake graduate study. 

The curriculum design has three components: 
complementary courses, supplementary courses, 
and core nursing courses. The course offerings in 
the natural, biological and human sciences support 
the philosophy that provides the basis for the con- 
ceptual framework of the professional nursing pro- 
gram. Professional nursing courses, which consti- 
tute the nursing major, include theory and practice 
in the nursing care of individuals and families. 
Learning opportunities are provided in hospitals, 
in homes, and in the community. 

The faculty of the School of Nursing conducts 
all professional nursing courses and also guides 
and directs the practicum learning experiences. A 
variety of hospitals and agencies cooperate with 
the School of Nursing to provide a wide selection 
of excellent practice settings. 

Upon the successful completion of this pro- 
gram, graduates will be eligible to write the exami- 
nation for licensure in the state in which they wish 
to practice. 

The faculty reserves the right to make changes 
in the curriculum and program requirements 
which are believed to be in keeping with the 
changing health needs of society and/or the best 
interest of the students and the School to maintain 
quality professional nursing education. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

ADMISSION OF HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES 

Students who are interested in applying for admis- 
sion to the School of Nursing should request an 
application from the Office of Admissions, 
Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15282. The 
specific entrance requirements for admission are: 

1. The applicant's high school curriculum must 
include a minimum of 16 units distributed as 
follows: 

English 4 units required 

Social Studies 3-4 units recommended 

Language 2 units recommended 

Math & Science 6 units recommended 

(1 unit Chemistry and 

1 unit Algebra 

required) 

2. A candidate must have been graduated from 
an approved secondary school in the upper two- 
fifths of the class, and must have demonstrated 
exemplary personal conduct in the institution. 

3. The primary consideration for admission is 
the secondary school academic record. This is con- 
sidered to be the most important criterion of suc- 
cess at Duquesne University. It is the desire of the 
Admissions Committee to admit those candidates 
who possess qualities of character and intellect 
and who show promise of development into useful 
and contributing citizens. 



110 



4. A candidate must present satisfactory scores 
of the required College Entrance Examination 
Board Scholastic Aptitude Test in accordance with 
the standards to which the University adheres. 

In specific instances, and at the discretion of the 
Committee on Admissions, the equivalent of these 
requirements may be accepted in lieu of the fore- 
going precise requirements. See the section on 
Admissions for other University requirements. 

REGISTERED NURSE STUDENTS 

Duquesne University School of Nursing currently 
offers an evening program for registered nurses. 
This program is designed to meet the needs of the 
registered nurse student who is a graduate of a 
hospital diploma program or an associate degree 
in nursing program. The nursing major portion of 
the program is being scheduled during the evening 
hours for the convenience of the working nurse. 

All students in the B.S.N. Evening Program 
must complete the University's liberal arts 
requirement prior to progressing to the nursing 
major. Any previously earned college credits will 
be evaluated for application toward the degree 
requirements. Please contact the School of Nurs- 
ing for a brochure describing this program. 

Admission Requirements — 
R.N./B.S.N. Program 

Students who are interested in applying for admis- 
sion to the R.N. — B.S.N, program should request 
an application from the Office of Admissions, 
Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15282. 

• High school diploma or equivalent 

•Graduation from an accredited associate 
degree (2.5 Q.P.A. minimum) or diploma nursing 
program 

• Verification of current licensure as a registered 
nurse in Pennsylvania 

• Present or past experience in nursing 

• Verification of active malpractice insurance 

• Fulfillment of prescribed science and math 
requirements of the School of Nursing 

• Personal interview 

Further information can be obtained from the 
Director of the R.N./B.S.N. Program in the School 
of Nursing. 

TRANSFER STUDENT ADMISSION 

See Admissions Section for further 

requirements 

Admission criteria for transfer students 

1. A cumulative QPA of 2.5 from the transfer- 
ring student's institution. 

2. 1 unit of chemistry and 1 unit of algebra, 
which can be from either a secondary school or 
postsecondary institution. 



3. Personal interview with the Academic Advi- 
sor in the School of Nursing. 

Provisions affecting placement 

1. No transfer student can be accepted into nurs- 
ing practicum courses during the first semester of 
attendance at Duquesne University. 

2. Only courses taken within the past ten years 
will be evaluated for transfer credit. For courses in 
the natural sciences, the limit is five years. This 
time limit may be evaluated in specific instances. 

SECOND DEGREE PROGRAM 

Applicants holding a baccalaureate with a major 
other than nursing must follow transfer student 
admission procedures. They should also arrange 
for a personal interview with the Academic Advi- 
sor in the School of Nursing. 

TEMPORARY TRANSFER 

With the approval of the Academic Advisor, a 
nursing student may take courses during the sum- 
mer at an accredited college or university other 
than Duquesne University. A student wishing to 
do this will become a temporary transfer student, 
providing he or she receives the necessary clear- 
ance from both institutions. 

1. A student must bring to the Academic Advi- 
sor both the catalog description of courses he or 
she wishes to take and the schedule for the sum- 
mer session in which they are given. The Aca- 
demic Advisor will evaluate the proposed courses 
and confirm the other institution's accreditation 
status. 

2. Ordinarily, a student who has acquired 60 or 
more credits may not receive advanced standing 
for courses taken at accredited community or two- 
year colleges. Language courses at the elementary 
or intermediate level are exceptions and may be 
taken even though the student has already earned 
60 or more credits. Other courses require special 
permission. 

3. A candidate for the Bachelor's degree must 
complete the last 30 credits (exclusive of challenge 
credits) toward the degree at Duquesne 
University. 

4. A student is responsible for earning a C grade, 
or its equivalent, or better, if he or she expects to 
receive advanced standing. The student must 
arrange to have an official copy of the transcript of 
grades earned at the institution in which he or she 
is a temporary transfer sent to the Academic Advi- 
sor in the School of Nursing in order to receive 
advanced standing. This transcript must be sent 
immediately upon completion of the course to be 
transferred. 



Ill 



ADDITIONAL EXPENSES AND 
REQUIREMENTS 

Student Liability Insurance (Professional) 
for three years $45.00 

Uniforms, nurse's cap, duty shoes, 
identification pin. (approx.) 107.00 

Transportation to and from clinical 
agencies (weekly) 10.00 (approx.) 

School of Nursing pin, if desired. . . . cost varies 

Physical examinations, diagnostic procedures, 
and immunizations (cost varies) 

Physical Assessment Kit 40.00 

Mosby Assess Test 20.00 (approx.) 

All students entering Nursing III are expected to 
produce evidence of completion of first aid certifi- 
cation and CPR certification. Students will not be 
permitted to enter clinical without evidence of 
these competencies. Students are expected to 
maintain currency in these competencies as they 
progress through the program. 

An annual physical examination and certain 
immunizations and health tests are required for all 
students in the School of Nursing. Pre-clinical stu- 
dents must complete specific health requirements 
by August 1 before proceeding to the Junior and 
Senior clinical practicum. The School of Nursing 
provides information on required school uniforms 
to students prior to entrance into the clinical area. 

Each student is responsible for transportation to 
and from hospital and other clinical resources. 
Each student will be expected to have access to an 
automobile to permit experience with home care 
of clients and their families in Nursing VI. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Each nursing student is a member of the general 
student body and may select and participate in 
any of the campus organizations. There are 
numerous social sororities and organizations as 
well as professional organizations. These organiza- 
tions exist for the promotion of the scholarly and 
professional interests of members: 

Alpha Tau Delta (meaning "through force of char- 
acter") is a national professional fraternity for per- 
sons in nursing. Theta Chapter was chartered on 
the Duquesne University campus on April 21, 
1938. Only full-time students who have completed 
a minimum of one semester in the School of Nurs- 
ing with a cumulative quality point average of 2.5 
are eligible. 

Sigma Theta Tau is the national nursing honorary 
Society. The Duquesne University Nursing Honor 
Society was granted a chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, 
Epsilon Phi, in November of 1981. Membership is 
open to students, faculty, and alumni who meet 
the criteria for election. 

Class Organizations. Each of the four classes is an 
officially recognized organization in the School of 



Nursing. Each class elects its own officers and con- 
ducts such programs and affairs as its members 
deem desirable toward achieving its goals. 

HONOR AWARDS 

In addition to graduation honors, these awards are 
presented at Honors Day: 

The Mary W. Tobin Gold Metal and The Dean 
Johnson Memorial Medal are awarded annually to 
two outstanding seniors chosen by the faculty. The 
Mary W. Tobin Gold Medal is awarded by the 
Theta Chapter of Alpha Tau Delta National Pro- 
fessional Fraternity for persons in nursing. It was 
established in 1945 to honor Mary Tobin on the 
occasion of her retirement from the University. 
The Dean Johnson Memorial Medal commemo- 
rates Dean Johnson's contributions to the growth 
of the School of Nursing. 

Four new awards were presented for the first 
time in 1983. The first award on behalf of Miles 
Laboratories, Inc., is awarded annually to the out- 
standing graduating senior in the area of acute care 
nursing. The award is called the Miles Laborato- 
ries Award for Excellence in Nursing Practice in 
the Acute Care Setting. The second award is called 
the Lanza Award for Excellence in Home Health 
Nursing, and is sponsored by Lanza, Hospital 
Equipment for the Home. This award is presented 
annually to the student demonstrating outstanding 
ability in the area of community health. The third 
award is sponsored by the United States Air Force. 
This award, the Air Force Leadership in Nursing 
Award, is presented to the graduate best demon- 
strating outstanding leadership qualities (in gen- 
eral), contributions to the nursing program and/or 
class, and evidence of community service and 
commitment to the profession. The last new 
award is for general excellence in the area of nurs- 
ing research and is awarded to a graduating senior. 
This award is sponsored by Sigma Theta Tau — 
Epsilon Phi Chapter. 

MOSBY ASSESS TEST 

The Mosby Assess Test Battery is required of all 
second semester seniors. The purpose of this bat- 
tery of tests is to provide a mechanism for feed- 
back to students to help in identifying strengths 
and weaknesses in preparation for the licensing 
examination. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

General University requirements for graduation 
are in the Academic Policies section of this cata- 
log. In addition, specific School of Nursing 
requirements are: 

1. Completion of 120 credits. 

2. A minimum cumulative over-all quality point 
average of 2.0. 

3. Successful completion of all clinical 
practicums. 

4. Completion of the required curriculum plan. 



112 



5. A candidate for the Bachelor's degree must 
complete the last 30 credits toward the degree at 
Duquesne University. Challenge credits are not 
included in this 30 credit requirement. 

6. Submission of an application for the degree. 
No student is considered a degree candidate until 
he/she files an application for the degree on a form 
provided by the Registrar. 

Degree requirements must be completed within 
10 years after initial enrollment. At the end of the 
10-year period, the student's record is re-evaluated 
in terms of the curriculum in effect at that time, 
and the student is advised of any additional 
requirements for graduation. The responsibility 
for fulfilling degree requirements rests with the 
student. 

RECOMMENDED COURSE 
SEQUENCE 



First Year 



Courses Credits 

Natural Science** 4 

Eng. 101 — 

English Comp 3 

Psych. 103.— 

Intro, to Psych 3 

Speech 3 



13 



Courses Credits 

Natural Science** 3 

Eng. 102. — 

Eng. Comp. II 3 

Soc. 101.— 

Survey of Soc 3 

N. 199.— Nursing I** . . . 3 
Phil. 104. — 

Intro, to Phil 3 



15 



Second Year 



Bio. 207 and 208. — Anatomy 

& Physiology** 4 

Psych. 225. — Developmental 

Psychology I** 3 

N. 255. — Nutrition** ... 3 
Philosophy 

or Theology 3 

N. 200.— Nursing** .... 3 



16 



N. 212.— Pathology** ... 4 
Psych. 266. — Developmental 

Psychology** 3 

Math 225.— Fund. 

of Stats 3 

Pharm. 3 — 

Basic Pharm.** 3 

Nursing Elective 3 

16 



N. 340.— Nursing III* 
Soc. 325. — 

Family Systems . 
General Elective . . . 



Third Year 

9 N. 341 



Nursing IV* ... 9 
Philosophy 

or Theology 3 

Nursing Elective 3 

15 



N. 460— Nursing V* 
Nursing Elective . . . 
N. 470— 

Research Process 



Fourth Year 

9 N. 461.— Nursing VI* . . . 9 

3 General Elective 3 

General Elective 3 



15 



*These courses must be taken during the semesters indicated. 
**Pre-requisite to Nursing III. 
Natural Sciences: Students are directed to enroll in Principles of 
Chemistry I during the Fall semester and General Biology II 
during the Spring semester 

Student Rights 

Bill of Rights — A statement of the student Bill of 
Rights is available to all students in the Duquesne 
University Student Handbook. The Student 



Handbook can be acquired in the student govern- 
ment office located in the student union. 

School of Nursing Student Handbook — A copy 
of the School of Nursing Student Handbook is 
available to all nursing students in the School of 
Nursing Office. This handbook contains informa- 
tion important to the students within the School of 
Nursing. 

School of Nursing Grievance Procedure 

Grievance procedures must be initiated within 30 
days of the occurrence which gave rise to the griev- 
ance. With the knowledge of the involved parties, 
either party may request that another person be 
present during the discussions. 

If difficulty arises between student and faculty, 
the student should first discuss the difficulty with 
the person directly involved. 

If the matter is not satisfactorily resolved, the 
appropriate course coordinator should be con- 
sulted. If the problem persists, the Associate Dean 
should then be contacted. 

In the event that a satisfactory agreement still 
has not been reached, the student should present 
his/her case before the Student Standing Commit- 
tee of the School of Nursing. 

If the problem is not satisfactorily resolved, a 
consultation with the Dean of the School of Nurs- 
ing should be arranged. 

Should the problem still remain unresolved, a 
"Request of Hearing" form should be filed with 
the Vice President for Academic Affairs within 20 
days of the Dean's decision. 

If the Academic Vice President's findings deter- 
mine that a legitimate grievance exists he will con- 
vene the academic due process committee. In all 
cases, the decision of the academic due process 
committee is final. If the Academic Vice President 
finds that a legitimate grievance does not exist, 
he/she will inform the student within (30) days of 
his/her determination. 

REGULATIONS 

Students in the School of Nursing are preparing 
themselves for entry into a respected health pro- 
fession where the highest degree of character and 
sense of responsibility are basic requirements. As 
such, they are expected to conduct themselves, at 
all times, in a manner befitting this position and 
according honor to it. For these reasons, the 
School of Nursing insists on strict adherence to the 
following regulations: 

1. Class Attendance. Attendance is mandatory 
for every class session of each course within the 
School of Nursing. Students are required to attend 
the entire class session. Specific class attendance 
requirements (in relation to grading) will be stated 
in each course syllabus. Acceptable reasons for 
absence will be in accordance with the current 
Undergraduate Catalog statement of scholastic 
policies. Consideration of any other request for an 



excused absence will be at the instructor's discre- 
tion. 

A student who is unable to attend class because 
of serious illness, hospitalization, a serious acci- 
dent or other extenuating circumstance is respon- 
sible for notifying the office of the Dean of the 
School of Nursing. A student who is absent for 
cause is expected to complete all of the work in all 
courses. It is the student's responsibility to make 
up all assignments in all courses and to be familiar 
with any instructions which may have been given 
during the absence. Attendance is mandatory for 
all scheduled hours in the clinical area. This 
includes community clinical hours as well as those 
scheduled in the acute care area. Acceptable rea- 
sons for absence will be in accordance with the 
current Undergraduate Catalog statement of scho- 
lastic policies. The student is expected to notify 
the clinical instructor of the absence prior to the 
scheduled clinical time. The specific procedure for 
this notification will be at the discretion of the 
clinical instructor. Consideration of any other 
request for an excused absence will be at the 
instructor's discretion. Tardiness or unexcused 
absence(s) are serious offenses of professional 
responsibility and accountability that may result 
in failure to meet course goals and indicators. 

Handicapped students requiring special assis- 
tance are urged to notify the class instructor before 
or at the first class. 

2. Health Requirements. All School of Nursing 
students entering studies are required to conform 
to the health requirements of the School of 
Nursing. 

Curriculum Standards 

To progress to the nursing practice courses, a min- 
imum cumulative QPA of 2.0 is required with a 
minimum of a C grade in the natural sciences 
(Biology and Chemistry), Anatomy and Physiol- 
ogy (including laboratory), Nutrition, Pathology, 
Nursing I and II, Basic Pharmacology, and Devel- 
opmental Psychology I and II. 

The School of Nursing faculty reserves the right 
to withdraw any student from the nursing major 
who, in its opinion, has not progressed satisfacto- 
rily in nursing practice even though the quality 
point average meets required standards. 

Students must maintain a minimum of a C 
grade in each clinical practice. An F in either the- 
ory or clinical practice will result in an F grade for 
the course. 

Students may repeat non-nursing courses one 
time only. This includes support courses offered in 
and out of the School of Nursing: that is Anatomy 
and Physiology and Lab, Pathology, Basic Phar- 
macology and Nutrition. Students may repeat only 
one course at the 300 level and one at the 400 level 
in the nursing major. 

The student is cautioned to seek regular advice 
from the faculty and to keep a record of credits 



113 



earned and the calculated averages. The School 
assumes no responsibility for such errors appear- 
ing in student records which may prevent the stu- 
dent from being graduated. 

The faculty of the School of Nursing reserves 
the right to make any changes in the curriculum 
that seem necessary or desirable. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Descriptions of courses in liberal arts and sciences 
may be found in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences section, pages 14 to 63. 

199. Nursing I. 3 cr. 

This course introduces the students to the disci- 
pline of nursing as a human science. The students 
in the course explore nursing as a human science 
in light of the major concepts of man and health. 
Students are introduced to key themes of the con- 
ceptual framework which have been identified as 
the processes of life, change, valuing, inquiry, car- 
ing, and family/nurse/client. Students explore the 
valuing process and look at self esteem as a means 
of valuing self. Students explore the process of 
man coming to know and investigate the historical 
emergence of nursing as a profession and a 
discipline. 

200. Nursing II. 3 cr. 

This course builds on Nursing I. The students 
examine nursing as a human science in light of 
interrelating health and man-in-his-family. Stu- 
dents will examine man as he lives in his health 
situation and as he participates in the health care 
system. Students will explore the process of valu- 
ing nursing research through systematic inquiry 
toward development of nursing theory. Students 
are encouraged to identify the meaning of respon- 
sibility for self as learner moving toward becoming 
a professional nurse. Students will begin to explore 
the nursing process and the components of a basic 
nursing assessment. Prerequisite: Nursing I. 

212. Pathology. 4 cr. 

The students in this course examine the major 
processes associated with disease, such as infec- 
tion, inflammation and the immune response. The 
major diseases affecting man and health in today's 
society are explored. Lecture, four hours. Prerequi- 
sites: Anatomy and Physiology Lecture and Labo- 
ratory. Offered during Spring Semester only. 

255. Nutrition. 3 cr. 

This course studies nutrition principles and their 
importance to all ages. Topics covered include: 
factors influencing food habits; exploration of 
ways in which nurses may help families and indi- 
viduals apply nutrition facts for promotion of 
health and well-being, and recent research in rela- 
tion to such national problems as heart disease, 
obesity, and increased life span. Lecture, three 
hours. Sophomore year. 



114 



340. Nursing III. 9 cr. 

This is the first clinical nursing course, building on 
Nursing II, in which the student begins to examine 
the processes of life, valuing, change, inquiry, car- 
ing and the nurse/client/family process. In Nurs- 
ing III, these processes will be further explored in 
relation to man's unidirectional movement as 
lived through health patterns. 

The nurse/client/family process is practiced as 
the method used by the discipline to promote 
health. Use of theory as a basis for practice is 
emphasized. The student will utilize knowledge 
from the sciences and humanities as he/she prac- 
tices the Nurse/Client/Family process in a clinical 
setting, with clients experiencing changing pat- 
terns of health. The course is offered during the 
Fall semester. Prerequisites: Natural Sciences, 
Anatomy and Physiology lecture and lab. Pathol- 
ogy, Nutrition, Pharmacology, Nursing I and II. 
Developmental Psychology I and II. Please con- 
tact the School of Nursing for information regard- 
ing health requirements, uniforms, CPR and First 
Aid certification, etc. 

341. Nursing IV. 9 cr. 

Nursing IV is the second clinical nursing course 
and builds on the learnings of Nursing III. The 
course focuses on decision-making as a participa- 
tive endeavor within the nurse/client/family 
process. 

Nursing IV also provides the student the oppor- 
tunity to explore adult man as he experiences 
changing patterns of energy in select nurse/client 
situations. 

The course is divided into three units emphasiz- 
ing nurse/client decision-making. These decisions 
are made in the following health care situations: 
high risk, crisis, short-term and long-term. The 
family and community are discussed as client sup- 
port systems. 

Nursing IV offers a clinical component in which 
the student cares for select clients in the acute 
medical-surgical and psychiatric settings. The 
course is offered during the Spring semester. Pre- 
requisite: Nursing III. 

460. Nursing V. 9cr. 

Nursing V, the third clinical nursing course, builds 
upon the learning in Nursing IV. The student 
examines nursing as a participant with evolving 
families. For the purpose of this course, the term 
evolving family will be viewed as a family pri- 
marily concerned with childbearing and childrear- 
ing. The student will focus on the interrelatedness 
and vulnerability of the family members as they 
strive toward family unity. The student will initi- 
ate interrelationships with evolving families as 
they experience separateness/togetherness to 
describe their health, evaluate alternatives and 
mobilize resources in planning change. Nursing 
practice will be based upon caring, valuing, and 



change processes to assist the family in the mobili 
zation of resources for health care. 

The course is presented in two units. Unit 
utilizes the nurse/client/family process with evolv 
ing families as they experience life processes. Th 
concept, separateness/togetherness, is utilized t 
explore the needs of the individual within the fam 
ily; the interrelatedness of family members, an> 
family dynamics as the family progresses toward 
unity. The major focus in Unit II is the concept c 
family vulnerability. The concept, separateness 
togetherness, continues to be used to explore ma 
and his family's experience of health. This cours 
is offered during the Fall semester. Prerequisite; 
Nursing IV, Family Systems. 

461. Nursing VI. 9 ci 

Nursing VI is the final clinical nursing course an 
builds on prior learnings. The focus of the cours 
is on the promotion of health with groups, in bot 
community and acute care settings. The nurse 
client/family process is the vehicle through whic 
the student participates in health promotior 
Emphasis throughout this course is on the collabc 
rative function of the nurse leader. The collaborc 
tive process with multi-disciplinary health tear 
members provides the opportunity for the genere 
tion of nursing research possibilities. 

The course is presented in two units. The fin 
unit deals with the nature of groups, groups c 
clients, the family as a group, and the communit 
as a group. The second unit deals with the nurse a 
a member and a leader of the nursing team, and a 
a member of the multi-disciplinary health can 
team. The course is offered during the Sprin 
semester. Prerequisite: Nursing V. 

470. The Research Process. 3 Ci 

This introductory course offers students an oppoi 
tunity to examine the historical perspectives c 
nursing research as well as trends and issues whic 
have emerged. These are discussed and criticall 
analyzed. Ethical implications of nursing researc 
are considered integratively. The students an 
encouraged to examine the research process fror 
a natural scientific viewpoint as well as from 
human science approach. Further application c 
the research process to nursing studies is explore! 
through critical evaluation of current research 
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Statistics and Nurs 
ing IV. 



NURSING ELECTIVES 

215. Computer Applications in Health Care. 3 ci 

This is an introductory computer course. Com 
puter Applications in Health Care is an electiv 
course designed to introduce the student to th 
basic fundamentals of data processing with a focu 
on applications in the health care field. Student 
will become familar with the basics of compute 
terminology and technology and be able to utilize 



a simple program. Learners will explore the vari- 
ous applications of information processing as they 
relate to health care including applications in edu- 
cation, practice, administration, and research. 
Trends and issues related to the various applica- 
tions will be introduced and discussed. This 
course will assist the student in following the 
inquiry theme throughout the curriculum. 



260. Ways of Healing. 3 cr. 

This course will explore many of the ways in 
which clients and their families are involved in the 
process of healing which are not thought to be 
medically traditional. This course will begin by 
looking at man's belief systems and how they 
affect his life and specifically, the healing process. 
The student will explore the mystery around 
unconventional or unexpected healing and look at 
this in relationship to man's belief systems, which 
are a reflection of how man participates in his own 
health. The student will then look at, in depth, two 
ways of healing. One way is biofeedback. The 
other is visual imagery with relaxation techniques 
as researched by Dr. Carl O. Simonton. The 
underlying theory will be explored, case histories 
will be discussed, and the student will get an 
opportunity to practice these techniques on him/ 
herself. In addition, the application of these tech- 
niques to the nurse/client/family process will be 
explored. There will also be student group 
presentations around seven other ways healing can 
i occur. These are: psychic surgery, hypnosis, spiri- 
tual healing, acupuncture, acupressure, laying on 
of hands and hex/voodoo. Prerequisite: Nursing I. 

299. Nursing and Spirituality. 3 cr. 

This course will initially identify the universal and 
timeless truth of the spiritual dimension of man's 
nature. It will then investigate case histories in 
nursing which focus on spiritual needs encoun- 
tered in the nurse-client relationship. The student 
will be encouraged to develop an awareness of his/ 
her own spiritual growth through nursing experi- 
ences. In addition, the student will discover the 
gift he/she brings to the nursing situation when 
spiritual needs are recognized and shared (entered 
into) with the client. 

300. Ways of Relating. 3 cr. 

This course builds on basic communication theory 
and skills. It offers the student the opportunity to 
enhance relationships through increasing self- 
awareness and critical analysis of one's own pat- 
terns. This knowledge promotes the motivation 
toward changing the individual's style of relating, 
the student learns to apply the skills of critical 
analysis, evaluation, and change to simulated 
nurse/client/family situations. 

353. Health Care Ethics. 3 cr. 

This course studies the practical and theoretical 
issues in the ethics of health care. Students will 
explore a number of ethical theories and will 
become aware of theological bases of and 



115 



approaches to health care ethics. Students are 
introduced to a model which offers direction for 
ethical decision-making in the health care context. 
The role of the nurse in ethical decision-making is 
discussed and some case studies involving dilem- 
mas that are faced by nurses are used to demon- 
strate the use of this model. However, the model is 
broad enough to be used in all areas of health care 
ethics and the student composition in the individ- 
ual class will give direction for the case studies 
used in this course. This course is offered jointly 
by the School of Nursing and the Theology 
Department. 

397. Health Care of Women. 3 cr. 

Health Care of Women is a nursing elective that 
will provide students with an opportunity to 
explore many of the prevalent health experiences 
of women in contemporary society. This course 
investigates aspects of women's health that 
involve choices relative to the quality of their 
lives. It will provide students with an opportunity 
to analyze health promotion for women from a 
nursing perspective. It will provide them with the 
knowledge of health resources available to meet 
the specific needs of women. 

398. Communicating with Children 

Through Play. 3 cr. 

Communicating with Children through Play is a 
non-clinical elective for any student who is inter- 
ested in pre-school-aged, school-aged and adoles- 
cent children. The focus of the course is on play as 
an evolutionary life experience. Emphasis is 
placed on play as a means of understanding chil- 
dren's behavior, as a valuable resource for antici- 
patory guidance with children, and as a means for 
the child to work through some of his/her immedi- 
ate life stresses. The participants will expand their 
perspectives of children's play as a form of com- 
munication by observation and evaluation of chil- 
dren's play by utilizing selected techniques. The 
selected play techniques that will be presented are: 
Drawings (draw-a-man, draw-a-family, draw-a- 
house-tree-person), Pigem's Question, Three 
Wishes, Story Completion, Make-up a Story, Pup- 
pet Play, and Therapeutic Play Interviews. Prereq- 
uisite: Psych 225 Developmental Psychology I and 
Psych 206 Developmental Psychology II or cur- 
rent enrollment in Developmental Psychology II. 
Open to any University student. 

399. Health Education. 3 cr. 

This course focuses upon the nurse's role as health 
educator and allows the student to explore the 
dynamic world of health education in today's soci- 
ety. The major issues confronting the nurse as a 
teacher are emphasized together with the processes 
of valuing and change in health education. The 
learning needs of the client-family are carefully 
scrutinized. The student has the opportunity to 
write and implement a teaching plan, design an 
evaluation tool, and create teaching aids. Prerequi- 
site: Nursing III. 



116 



400. Practical Approaches to Implementing 

the Nursing Process. 3 cr. 

This course is a clinical nursing elective designed 
to provide students with the opportunity to utilize 
the process of inquiry specifically through a prob- 
lem solving methodology. Students will re- 
examine the elements of the Nurse/Client/Family 
process drawing upon past learning, utilizing data 
and information derived from the current practice 
setting. Students will then synthesize these ele- 
ments and formulate relevant nursing care plans 
which reflect a refinement of problem solving 
skills. Outcomes realized through the utilization of 
the nurse/client process will then be analyzed and 
evaluated. Through the selected learning experi- 
ences occurring within the actual practice setting, 
students will also have the opportunity to examine 
the values that exist in the practice setting itself 
and the impact that they have on the Nurse/Cli- 
ent/Family process. Prerequisite: Nursing IV. 

458. Family Nursing in the 

Appalachian Community. 3 cr. 

This course offers the student an opportunity to 
implement the Nurse/Client/Family process with 
families in a rural community whose cultural ref- 
erence is different from that usually encountered. 
Students examine history and cultural patterns of 
the geographical area for their influence on health 
and health care delivery systems. Group process is 
explored as it relates to communal living and 
intense working relationships with a temporary 
multidisciplinary team of volunteer health provid- 
ers. This course is offered during the summer and 
is by special permission only. Prerequisite: Nurs- 
ing IV, Family Systems. 

463. Patterns of Aging. 3 cr. 

This course is an elective course designed to 
examine the aging process with a focus on the 



older adult. Emphasis is placed on the meaning of 
increasing complexity in the life process. Learners 
will examine changing belief systems as they relate 
to health services for the older adult. Learners are 
expected to critically investigate the Nurse/Client/ 
Family process through selected situations. 

466. Choosing the Living in Dying. 3 cr. 

Choosing the Living in Dying is a three-credit, 
non-clinical elective for nursing majors. The focus 
of the course is on dying as an evolutionary life 
experience. Emphasis is placed on the quality of 
living throughout the dying process. The learners 
will develop their prespectives of the dying process 
and current issues in America related to that pro- 
cess. Meaning will be enhanced through the shar- 
ing of thoughts, feelings and perceptions within 
the group process. 

480. Senior Nursing Seminar 3 cr. 

This senior nursing seminar focuses upon clients' 
experiencing a wide range of health related 
problems throughout the life continuum. The syn- 
thesis of nursing theory and related science bases 
is accomplished through utilization of case studies 
and faculty/student discussions. Inquiry and deci- 
sion making are emphasized within the framework 
of Nurse/Client/Family process. This course is 
offered only in the spring. Prerequisite: Nursing V. 

499. Directed Study. 3 cr. 

This course in Directed Studies provides students 
with the opportunity to pursue an area of individ- 
ual interest in nursing which is consistent with the 
curriculum. Students will have the opportunity to 
generate goals related to the area of interest they 
wish to pursue and to formulate and implement a 
plan for achieving these goals. By special permis- 
sion only. 




117 



School of Pharmacy 



HISTORY 

Plans for establishing a School of Pharmacy were 
instituted in 1911, when the charter of the Univer- 
sity was amended and authority obtained to grant 
degrees in Pharmacy. On April 20, 1925, the final 
work of organizing the School of Pharmacy was 
completed. The first class was received September 
21, 1925. 

Duquesne University School of Pharmacy is 
housed in Richard King Mellon Hall of Science, 
whose design by master architect Mies van der 
Rohe won the "Laboratory of the Year" award for 
1969 in the annual Industrial Research, Inc. sur- 
vey of new science buildings across the country. 
The School's specialized facilities include the 
Hugh C. Muldoon Model Pharmacy, animal oper- 
ating room, bionucleonics laboratory, eight addi- 
tional teaching laboratories, and a manufacturing 
pharmacy laboratory containing basic pharmaceu- 
tical manufacturing equipment and separate 
tableting and aerosol technology areas. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

The School of Pharmacy, as an integral part of the 
University, embodies as its own, the mission and 
goals set forth by the University. 

The School of Pharmacy has many important 
missions, but the primary mission of the School is 
to prepare practitioners for life-long careers in 
pharmacy and allied health sciences. Academic 
training must build sufficient knowledge and skill 
to allow graduates to practice in the present envi- 
ronment and to grow and adapt as the practice 
environment changes. 

The curriculum in pharmacy represents a com- 
posite of educational experiences that results in a 
well-educated and well-trained professional and 
offers the undergraduate student a well-rounded 
and broad education which will inspire a perma- 
nent interest in learning 

In order to be a competent pharmacist, the stu- 
dent must become a therapeutic specialist who has 
knowledge of drugs and their actions. Secondly, 
the pharmacist must possess skills and knowledge 
to manage a professional practice. The compre- 
hensive and specialized nature of the curriculum 
offers the Pharmacy graduate a choice of occupa- 
tions within the profession and its closely allied 
fields, as well as an adequate foundation for the 
continuation of studies on a graduate level in 
many areas. 

Within the profession of Pharmacy, a graduate 
may become a community pharmacist, hospital 
pharmacist, or a pharmacist in government ser- 
vice. Many pharmacists find employment as medi- 
cal service representatives for drug manufacturers. 
Some enter the wholesale drug business and the 
pharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Gradu- 
ates in pharmacy are exceptionally well-qualified 



to become agents for the enforcement of narcotic 
and pure food and drug laws. In recent years, phar- 
macists have entered the fields of nuclear 
pharmacy and drug information-poison control. 
Many pharmacists find employment as chemists 
or biologists in industrial and research organiza- 
tions in allied fields; others enter the profession of 
teaching. Additional study is required for some of 
these positions. A few pharmacists continue their 
study in other health professions leading to a sec- 
ond professional degree or an advanced degree in 
the basic pharmaceutical and medical sciences. 

The School of Pharmacy directs the professional 
program leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy 
degree. Those graduates are qualified for place- 
ment in clinical pharmacy positions in hospitals 
across the nation. 

Medical technologists work under the direction 
of a pathologist or clinical scientist. In the field of 
Medical Technology, positions are available in 
hospital and industrial laboratories preparing tis- 
sue samples and slides for microscopic study, tak- 
ing blood samples, storing plasma, and keeping 
records of tests. 

In the field of Radiological Health, positions as 
health physicist are available in hospitals and any 
laboratories and industrial facilities which use 
radioisotopes. 

The Graduate School of Liberal Arts and Sci- 
ences of Duquesne University offers programs 
through the Department of Pharmaceutical Sci- 
ences, leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree 
in pharmaceutical chemistry and medicinal chem- 
istry, and the Master of Science degree in the fields 
of pharmaceutics, pharmaceutical chemistry, 
pharmacology-toxicology and medicinal 
chemistry. 

DEGREES 

The School of Pharmacy offers programs leading 
to three undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Pharmacy, Bachelor of Science in Medical 
Technology, and Bachelor of Science in Radiologi- 
cal Health; these are described on the following 
pages. 

Descriptions of advanced degrees offered by the 
faculty of the School of Pharmacy are found in 
other catalogs available from the School of 
Pharmacy office. 

PROGRAMS 
PHARMACY 

The School of Pharmacy offers a Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree in Pharmacy upon completion of the 
undergraduate professional program. The first two 
years encompass many courses offered by the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences in addition to 
several professional courses. The latter three years 



118 



of study are taught mainly by the pharmacy 
faculty, with electives being available from both 
that faculty and all other schools of the University. 
Students are enrolled in the School of Pharmacy 
for all years. Transfer students are enrolled accord- 
ing to qualifications in the first, second or third 
year of the five-year sequence. Legal requirements 
of all states are met with regard to graduation from 
an accredited college of pharmacy. Licensure in 
the several states may be acquired by meeting spe- 
cific additional requirements of each particular 
state. 

Residency Requirements 

The pharmacy curriculum has been designed to 
provide a sequence of courses leading to profes- 
sional competence. The minimum time period in 
which this may be accomplished has been deter- 
mined by the faculty to be three years of full-time 
residency. This residency requirement for the final 
years of the professional curriculum is in accor- 
dance with a policy statement ratified by the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 
and followed by all colleges of pharmacy in estab- 
lishing minimum residency requirements, as well 
as guidelines for professional education. The resi- 
dency requirement is applicable to all students 
regardless of advanced standing status. 



Curriculum 

A minimum of 30 credits in the combined general 
education areas of humanities and social sciences 
is required for graduation from the School of 
Pharmacy (fifteen in the Humanities including 
English Composition and Theology and six in the 
Social Sciences and nine credits chosen from 
either area in consultation with the advisor). 
Courses fulfilling the Theology requirement are 
listed under the Department of Theology in the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this 
catalog. 



The faculty recommends and reserves the right 
to require completion of course clusters in the 
humanities and social sciences as a means to pro- 
vide a strong general education for all health pro- 
fessionals. A list of suggested course clusters 
appears at the end of this section. 



The student is cautioned to seek regular advice 
from the faculty and to keep a record of credits 
earned and the calculated averages. The School 
assumes no responsibility for such errors appear- 
ing in student records which may prevent the stu- 
dent from being graduated. 



PHARMACY CURRICULUM 
For classes entering in Fall, 1982 and thereafter. 



First Year 



Fall Semester 

1 1 1 General Biology I 

121 General Chemistry I 

101 English Composition I 

115 Calculus I 

101 Pharmacy Orientation 



Fall Semester 
205 Organic Chemistry I 
201 General Physics I 
Humanities Elective 
Social Science Elective 

General Elective 



Fall Semester 

317 Human Anatomy & 

Physiology II 
301 Basic Pharmaceutics- 
Pharmacy Math I 
309 Biochemistry-Nutrition 
333 Drug Literature Resources 
325 Pharmacy Management 



D* 

3 
3 
3 
4 
1 
14 

D* 

3 
4 
3 
3 

3 
16 



L* 

4 
4 



C* 

4 
4 
3 
4 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 
112 General Biology II 
122 General Chemistry II 
102 English Composition II 
Humanities Elective 



* 


L* 


C* 


3 


4 


4 


3 


8 


5 


3 


— 


3 


3 


— 


3 



12 12 15 



L* 

4 

2 



Second Year 

C* Spring Semester 

4 206 Organic Chemistry II 

4 Social Science Elective 

3 Humanities Elective 

3 220 Human Anatomy 

& Physiology I 
3 230 Pharmacy Law 

17 



Third Year 

Y)* l* £* Spring Semester 

318 Pathophysiology 



3 4 

4 2 
1 1 
4 — 

15 10 



302 Basic Pharmaceutics II 
319 Medical Microbiology- 
Immunology 
310 Analysis of Drug Substances 
326 Pharmacy Administration 



D* 

3 

3 
3 

4 

3 

16 

D* 

3 



3 

4 

3 

16 



L* 

4 



4 
L* 

4 
3 



C* 

4 
3 

3 

4 

3 
17 

C* 

3 



7 1 



Fall Semester 

321 Pharmacology-Drug 
Mechanisms I 

305 Pharmaceutics- 

Biopharmaceutics III 

313 Medicinal Chemistry- 
Natural Products I 

324 Public Health-Emergency 
Treatment 

General or Professional 
Elective 



Fall Semester 

440 Therapeutics 

323 OTC Drugs 

430 Patient Counseling & 
Education 
Professional and/or 
General Electives 



Fourth Year 

Q* L* q* Spring Semester 

322 Pharmacology-Drug 
4 — 4 Mechanisms II 

306 Pharmaceutics- 

3 — 3 Pharmacokinetics IV 

314 Medicinal Chemistry- 

4 — 4 Natural Products II 

431 Behavioral Aspects of Illness 
3 — 3 General or Professional 

Elective 



D* 



119 



C* 



3 


— 


3 




17 


— 


17 








Fifth Year 


D* 


L* 


C* 


Spring Semester 


6 


— 


6 


441 Practical Pharmacy I- 


2 


— 


2 


Clinical Clerkship 
432 Practical Pharmacy II- 


2 


2 


3 


Community 
433 Practical Pharmacy III 


6 




6 


Hospital 
434 Practical Pharmacy IV 
Optional 



4 — 



4 — 

2 — 

3 — 
16 4 



17 



16 



17 



D* L* C* 

— — 3 

— — 3 

— — 3 

— — 3 

— — 12 



D* — Didactic hours, L* — Laboratory hours, C* — Credit hours. 

Courses are to be completed in the designated sequence. 

Minimum credits for B.S. in Pharmacy Degree — 163; sufficient elective courses must be taken to satisfy the 

minimum credit requirements. 

Portions of the new curriculum are being phased in for students in the Classes of 1985 and 1986. 

Changes may be made in some parts of the curriculum indicated for the Class of 1987 and succeeding classes 

as a result of faculty evaluation of the new Pharmacy curriculum. 



AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

During the fourth year (earlier if possible) each 
pharmacy student is urged to select an area of 
concentration from one of the following areas: 
Community Practice, Institutional Practice, 
Industrial Pharmacy, Nuclear Pharmacy, or Pre- 
Graduate Study. Six credits in Professional 
Pharmacy Electives is the minimum requirement 
for graduation. 

1. Community Practice 

481 — Pharmacy Sales and Marketing 
482 — Community Pharmacy Practice 
561 — General Toxicology 
566 — Clinical Toxicology 

2. Institutional Practice 

491 — Hospital Pharmacy Management 

814 — Parenteral Therapy 

501 — Manufacturing Pharmacy 

539 — Bionucleonics 

540 — Advanced Bionucleonics and 

Radiopharmaceuticals 
561 — General Toxicology 
566 — Clinical Toxicology 

3. Industrial Pharmacy 

501 — Manufacturing Pharmacy 
502 — Pharmaceutical Formulation 
and Development 



The course clusters represent depth in a profes- 
sional area of choice. Students may make their 
own selection of courses in consultation with their 
advisors. 

The following courses are approved for the 
respective areas of concentration: 



504 — Industrial Pharmacy and 

Governmental Affairs 
510 — Advanced Pharmacokinetics I 
522 — Spectral Methods 
539 — Bionucleonics 
Pharmacy students who select the Industrial 
Pharmacy area of concentration, may spend part 
of the required B.S. in Pharmacy practicum in an 
industrial setting. 

4. Nuclear Pharmacy 
539 — Bionucleonics 
540 — Advanced Bionucleonics and 

Radiopharmaceuticals 
489 — Problems in Health Physics 

(offered by Physics Department) 
Students who satisfactorily complete the nine- 
credit requirement of the Nuclear Pharmacy area 
of concentration, are awarded a certificate. Also, 
Pharmacy students who select the Nuclear 



20 



Pharmacy area of concentration, may spend part 
of the required B.S. in Pharmacy practicum in a 
nuclear pharmacy and/or nuclear medicine set- 
ting. 

5. Pre-Graduate Study 

Students who elect this option must consult 
with the chairman of the department of their area 



of interest in order to select courses most adapta- 
ble to the program they desire to pursue. A com- 
bined B.S. in Pharmacy/M.S. program is available 
to qualified students. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

The program, leading to the degree B.S. in Medical 
Technology, is a joint effort between Duquesne 
University and Mercy Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
The program involves completion of 124 credits, 
with 30 of the credits being taken in the Mercy 
Hospital School of Medical Technology in the 
fourth year of the program. Graduates of the pro- 
gram are eligible for national certifying examina- 
tions. 

The School of Medical Technology at Mercy 
Hospital is approved by the National Accrediting 
Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences which 
acts as adviser to the Council on Medical Educa- 
tion of the American Medical Association. It is 
responsible for establishing and maintaining high 
standards of education in A.M. A. -approved 
schools of medical technology. 

Students in the program enroll in the School of 
Pharmacy as medical technology majors. These 
students are advised through the Office of the 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Admission to the fourth year of the program will 
be on a competitive basis with these as the deter- 
mining factors: 

1. A minimum cumulative quality point average 
of 3.00 in the sciences is recommended. 

2. No student with a grade lower than C in any 
chemistry course will be considered for admission. 

3. Written recommendations. 

4. Personal interview with the Student Selection 
Committee of the Mercy Hospital School of Medi- 
cal Technology. 



Fall Semester 

101 English Composition I 

105 College Algebra and 

Trigonometry 
1 1 1 General Biology I 
121 General Chemistry I 



Fall Semester 
201 General Physics I 
205 Organic Chemistry I 
Humanities Elective 
Social Science Elective 
Theology or Elective 



Applications for entrance to the fourth year are to 
be made before October 15 of the third year. Infor- 
mation and applications are available from the 
Office of the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

During the fourth year of the program, students 
will register and pay tuition to Duquesne Univer- 
sity. They will be permitted to reside in the Uni- 
versity dormoritories and enjoy all of the privi- 
leges of Duquesne University students. 

Failure in any of the major courses included in 
the fourth year will lead to immediate dismissal 
from the Mercy Hospital School of Medical Tech- 
nology. 

Curriculum 

A minimum of 15 credits in the combined areas of 
humanities and social sciences is required for 
graduation (nine in the Humanities, including 
Theology, and six in the Social Sciences, including 
Principles of Management). Courses for fulfilling 
the Theology requirement are listed under the 
Department of Theology in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences section of this catalog. 

The faculty recommends and reserves the right 
to require completion of course clusters in human- 
ities and social sciences. A list of the suggested 
course clusters appears at the end of this section. 

The student is cautioned to seek regular advice 
from the faculty and to keep a record of credits 
earned and the calculated averages. The School of 
Pharmacy assumes no responsibility for such 
errors appearing in student records which may 
prevent the student from being graduated. 







First Year 








D* 


L* 


C* 


Spring Semester 


D* 


L* 


C* 


3 . 


. — 


3 


102 English Composition II 


3 


— 


3 








115 Calculus I 


4 


— 


4 


4 





4 










3 


4 


4 


112 General Biology II 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


122 General Chemistry II 


3 


8 


5 


13 


8 


15 




13 


12 


16 






Second Year 








D* 


L* 


C* 


Spring Semester 


D* 


L* 


C* 


4 


2 


4 


306 Applied Electronics 


3 


2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


206 Organic Chemistry II 


3 


4 


4 


3 


— 


3 


319 Medical Microbiology- 








3 


— 


3 


Immunology 


3 


3 


4 


3 


— 


3 


220 Human Anatomy 














& Physiology I 


4 


— 


4 


16 


6 


17 




13 


9 


15 



121 









Third Year 


Fall Semester 


D* 


L* 


C* Spri 


317 Human Anatomy & 






318 


Physiology II 


3 


3 


4 361 


309 Biochemistry-Nutrition 


4 


2 


4 421 


Humanities Elective 


3 


— 


3 202 


Electives 


6 


— 


6 




16 


5 


17 



Spring Semester 

Pathophysiology 
Principles of Management 
Analytical Chemistry 
General Physics II 



D* 

3 
3 
3 
4 



C* 

3 
3 
4 
4 



13 10 14 



D* — Didactic hours, L* — Laboratory hours, C* — Credit hours. 

Courses may be offered in semesters other than those indicated as the Pharmacy curriculum is revised. 

Fourth Year 

The fourth year of the program will begin in July and continue for twelve consecutive months. Courses and 
laboratory assignments will be held at Mercy Hospital. The following syllabus will be covered with 30 
credits awarded for completion of the courses. 

Credits 

2 

2 

1 



Courses Credits 

61 Clinical Chemistry 7 

62 Urinalysis 2 

63 Hematology 5 

64 Blood Banking 3 

65 Bacteriology 5 

All of the required course work, laboratories, sup- 
plies, facilities and faculty for the fourth year of 
the program will be provided by Mercy Hospital 



Courses 

66 Parasitology 

67 Immunology 

69 Mycology 

70 Virology 1 

71 Nuclear Pathology 2 

Total 30 

School of Medical Technology. The faculty of the 
School of Medical Technology is recognized as 
faculty at Duquesne University. 



RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH 

Since 1972 the School of Pharmacy has offered a 
four-year 123-credit program leading to a Bachelor 
of Science degree in Radiological Health. Gradu- 
ates from the program qualify for positions of 
health physicist in any facilities using radioactive 
isotopes. 

Students in the radiological health program 
enroll in the School of Pharmacy as radiological 
health majors. These students are advised through 
the Office of the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 
Curriculum 

A minimum of 15 credits in the combined areas of 
humanities and social sciences is required for 
graduation (nine in the Humanities, including 

First 
Fall Semester D* L* C* 

101 English Composition I 3 — 3 

105 College Algebra and 

Trigonometry 
1 1 1 General Biology I 
121 General Chemistry I 



4 

3 

3 

13 



4 

4 

4 

15 



Theology, and six in the Social Sciences). Courses 
for fulfilling the Theology requirement are listed 
under the Department of Theology in the College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this catalog. 

The faculty recommends and reserves the right 
to require completion of course clusters in the 
humanities and social sciences. A list of the sug- 
gested course clusters appears at the end of this 
section. 

The student is cautioned to seek regular advice 
from the faculty and to keep a record of credits 
earned and the calculated averages. The School of 
Pharmacy assumes no responsibility for such 
errors appearing in student records which may 
prevent the student from being graduated. 
Year 

Spring Semester D* 

102 English Composition II 3 

115 Calculus I 4 

112 General Biology II 3 

122 General Chemistry II 3 



C* 

3 
4 
4 
5 



13 12 16 



Fall Semester 

211 General Analytical 

Physics I 
205 Organic Chemistry I 
116 Calculus II 

Theology or Elective 



D* 

3 
3 
4 
3 

13 



Second Year 

-.* C* Spring Semester 

212 General Analytical 

3 4 Physics II 

4 4 206 Organic Chemistry II 

- 4 215 Calculus III 

— 3 220 Human Anatomy and 

Physiology I 
7 15 



D* 

3 
3 
4 

4 
14 



(2* 

4 
4 
4 

4 
16 



122 



Fall Semester 

317 Human Anatomy and 

Physiology II 
309 Biochemistry-Nutrition 
225 Fundamentals of Statistics 
539 Bionucleonics 

Humanities Elective 



Fall Semester 

473 Atomic Physics 

541 Radiological Health I 

325 Applications in 
Statistics 

Social Science Elective 
Humanities Elective 







Third Year 








D* 


L* 


Q* 


Spring Semester 


D* 


L* 


C* 








306 Applied Electronics 


1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


101 Physical Geology 


3 


— 


3 


4 


2 


4 


216 Ordinary Differential 








3 


— 


3 


Equations 


3 


— 


3 


3 


3 


3 


540 Advanced Bionucleonics 


3 


3 


3 


3 


— 


3 


Social Science Elective 


3 


— 


3 


16 


8 


17 




13 


5 


14 






Fourth Year 








D* 


L* 


C* 


Spring Semester 


D* 


L* 


C* 


3 


— 


3 


483 Nuclear Physics 


3 


— 


3 


4 


— 


4 


542 Radiological Health II 


3 


4 


4 








204 Meterology 


3 


— 


3 


3 


— 


3 


451 Practice in Radiological 








3 


— 


3 


Health 


— 


16 


4 


3 


— 


3 










16 


— 


16 




9 


20 


14 



*D — Didactic hours, L* — Laboratory, C* — Credit hours. 

Courses may be offered in semesters other than those indicated as the Pharmacy curriculum is revised. 



ADMISSION 

Students who plan to enter any of the programs 
offered by the School of Pharmacy are encouraged 
to meet with the Dean, Assistant Dean, or the 
Dean's designate for a personal interview. 
Entrance requirements are listed under Admission 
Policies in the General Information section of this 
catalog. Applications should be submitted as early 
in the year of matriculation as possible. 

The national Pharmacy College Admissions 
Test (PCAT) may be taken by applicants. Results 
should be reported to the Admissions Office and to 
the School of Pharmacy. The test is not required 
for admission to the School, but the results are 
used by advisement personnel to assess the level 
of knowledge in pertinent areas related to the pro- 
gram. Superior performance in certain topics will 
alert the student to enroll for advanced placement 
examinations. 

The School of Pharmacy admits students into 
each of the first three years of the medical technol- 
ogy and radiological health programs and into the 
first, second, or third year of the pharmacy pro- 
gram. Procedures for entrance are outlined under 
Application Procedures in the General Informa- 
tion section of this catalog. 

All transfer students must be interviewed by the 
Dean, Assistant Dean, or Dean's designate in the 
School of Pharmacy. Students intending to trans- 
fer into the pharmacy program must have success- 
fully completed the appropriate math, science and 
liberal arts prerequisities for entrance into the sec- 
ond or third year of the curriculum. Advisors at 
the School of Pharmacy are available to meet with 
students to discuss the requirements necessary for 
possible future placement in the School of 
Pharmacy. 

Transfer pharmacy students must complete a 
minimum of three academic years of residence in 
the School of Pharmacy. 



In extenuating circumstances and with the per- 
mission of the School of Pharmacy Student Stand- 
ing Committee, a waiver of the three years of resi- 
dence required by the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy will be sought by the faculty 
on behalf of the student. Failure to request and 
obtain such a waiver requires the pharmacy stu- 
dents to complete a minimum of six semesters in 
residence as full-time students. 

Advanced credit for courses completed at other 
institutions may be allowed for those courses 
which appear in the Duquesne curricula. No credit 
is allowed in any subject in which a grade lower 
than C was earned or for a course not equivalent 
to one among the University curricula. Once 
enrolled at Duquesne, students may not pursue 
courses at other institutions for transfer credit 
without specific permission from the Office of the 
Dean. 

Advanced standing is conditional until the stu- 
dent completes a minimum of one semester's 
work (16 semester hours). If his work proves 
unsatisfactory, the student will be requested to 
withdraw. 

Applicants who have completed advanced 
courses in high school are encouraged to take 
advanced placement tests (see Admission section 
of this catalog). Partial advanced placement credit 
for some courses may be awarded for these exami- 
nations. Students are advised to investigate care- 
fully the credit equivalency. 

SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

Any student designated as an Admissions Scholar 
upon entrance to the University and to the School 
of Pharmacy or who has obtained a cumulative 
average of 3.50 is named to the School of 
Pharmacy Scholars Program. Students enrolled in 
any major offered by the School are eligible. Selec- 
tion is made annually on the basis of academic 
standing. No application is required. Scholars are 



123 



. recognized annually at the fall social gathering and 
encouraged to investigate Advanced Placement, 
CLEP, and Challenge Examination opportunities, 
faculty research projects in which they may par- 
ticipate, and independent study courses. 

SPECIAL FEES 

Laboratory 

Required laboratory courses scheduled by all 
schools of the University are subject to fees as 
published. Pharmacy laboratories require a fee of 
$40 each a semester. This is a prorated charge 
derived from the total costs of all laboratory oper- 
ations throughout the professional years. Other 
courses offered in the program of medical technol- 
ogy and radiological health are subject to special 
fees. No laboratory fees are assessed for courses 
scheduled in the fourth year of the medical tech- 
nology program. 

Activities 

Instituted by student request, this fee of $30 a 
semester for a minimum of six semesters covers 
such miscellaneous items as local and national 
Student American Pharmaceutical Association 
dues and journal subscription; laboratory jacket, 
towels and name pin fees; class dues and support 
of the pharmacy student newsletter, Phorum; and 
partial travel expenses for one required field trip to 
a pharmaceutical manufacturing firm. Payment is 
made at registration each semester. This prorated 
fee is assessed only to those students in the last 
three years of the pharmacy program. 

School of Pharmacy Fee 

All students enrolled in any program of the School 
of Pharmacy are required to pay a fee designated 
by the University. This fee, which is assessed for 
each semester that a student is enrolled in the 
School of Pharmacy, assists with the special oper- 
ating expenses of the School of Pharmacy. 

REGULATIONS 

Students in the School of Pharmacy are preparing 
themselves for entry into a respected health pro- 
fession where the highest degree of character and 
sense of responsibility are basic requirements. As 
such, they are expected to conduct themselves, at 
all times, in a manner befitting this position and 
according honor to it. For these reasons, the 
School of Pharmacy insists on strict adherence to 
the following regulations: 

1. Class Attendance. Regular class attendance in 
the School of Pharmacy is normally required for 
maximum educational advantage. The responsi- 
bility for all course material rests wholly with the 
student. Under no circumstances will class attend- 
ance be used as the sole basis for altering a grade 
in a course. This principle shall not modify the 
prerogative of each instructor to establish specific 
policies for attendance at tests, examinations, class 
lectures, deadlines for reports, and other specific 
school or course requirements. 



A student who is unable to attend class because 
of serious illness, hospitalisation, a serious acci- 
dent or other extenuating circumstances is respon- 
sible for notifying the office of the Dean of the 
School of Pharmacy. The student should supply a 
written verification as soon as possible. A student 
who is absent for cause is expected to complete all 
of the work in all courses. It is the student's 
responsibility to make up all assignments in all 
courses and to be familiar with any instructions 
which may have been given during the absence. 

Handicapped students requiring special assis- 
tance are urged to notify the class instructor before 
or at the first class. 

2. Academic Standards. All students who are 
admitted to the School of Pharmacy must main- 
tain a 2.0 QPA (quality point average) in the 
required courses in the professional pharmacy cur- 
riculum, throughout the program. Students who 
do not achieve a 2.0 QPA by the end of the first 
professional year may be admitted to the second 
year on a probationary basis. No student will be 
admitted to the third, fourth, or fifth years of the 
program with less than a 2.0 QPA in all courses 
and in professional courses. A minimum cumula- 
tive 2.00 QPA in the pre-pharmacy science and 
math courses is required for entrance into the 
third year of the pharmacy program. A student 
will not be admitted to the fifth year of the 
Pharmacy program without successful completion 
of all required courses in Pharmacy I, II, III, IV. 

3. Required Programs. Pharmacy students in the 
fourth year of the curriculum are required to par- 
ticipate in one industrial visit arranged by the 
School. 

The faculty of the School of Pharmacy may 
require Pharmacy student attendance at other 
seminars and special programs. 

4. Health Requirements. Any School of 
Pharmacy student entering studies in a hospital or 
other institutional setting may be required to con- 
form to the health requirements of that institution. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The Student American Pharmaceutical Association 
whose membership includes all pharmacy stu- 
dents registered in the last three years of the 
School of Pharmacy aims to promote their inter- 
ests, academic, social and professional. Under its 
auspices, many worthwhile events are arranged 
during the school year. The executive committee 
meets regularly with the Dean and the faculty 
moderator to act as liaison between students and 
faculty. The annual membership fee includes one 
year's student membership in the American Phar- 
maceutical Association and a year's subscription 
to its Journal. Interested pharmacy students 
enrolled in their first and second years at the Uni- 
versity are also eligible for membership and are 
encouraged to become actively involved in 
SAPhA. 



124 



The Alpha Beta Chapter of Rho Chi, national 
pharmacy honor society at Duquesne University, 
was organized to promote the advancement of the 
pharmaceutical sciences. Pharmacy students who 
have completed three and one-half years of work 
at the University level and have achieved a B 
average are eligible for membership. A maximum 
of 20 percent of the class enrollment may be 
admitted to membership. Faculty, graduate stu- 
dents in the pharmaceutical sciences, and Doctor 
of Pharmacy students may also be invited to join. 

Eta Chapter of Phi Lambda Sigma, a national 
professional pharmaceutical society, was chartered 
at Duquesne University in 1980. The society rec- 
ognizes and encourages leadership in the profes- 
sion of pharmacy. The society selects members 
who have completed at least two and one half 
years in the pharmacy program and have demon- 
strated exemplary leadership qualities. 

Tau Chapter of Lambda Kappa Sigma, an inter- 
national pharmaceutical fraternity for women, was 
established at Duquesne University in 1932. The 
organization numbers among its members some of 
the most outstanding women in pharmacy. Its 
purposes are to promote the profession of 
pharmacy and to create a center of culture and 
enjoyment for its members. 

The Beta Gamma Chapter of Phi Delta Chi, an 
international pharmaceutical fraternity, was 
chartered at Duquesne University in 1960. The 
fraternity endeavors to integrate academic, spiri- 
tual and social activities and thereby foster the 
highest professional and personal ideals among its 
members. Membership is open to students in 
pharmacy. 

The Delta Epsilon Chapter of Kappa Psi Phar- 
maceutical Fraternity was chartered in 1967. This 
international fraternity strives to develop indus- 
try, sobriety, and fellowship and to foster high ide- 
als, scholarship, and pharmaceutical research 
while supporting all projects advancing the profes- 
sion of pharmacy. Membership is open to students 
in pharmacy. 

Class Organizations. Each of the five classes is 
an officially recognized organization in the School 
of Pharmacy. Each class elects its own officers and 
conducts such programs and affairs as its members 
deem desirable toward achieving its goals. All stu- 
dents are included in these organizations regard- 
less of degree curriculum. 

HONOR AWARDS 

American Institute of the History of Pharmacy 
Award. A recognition certificate and gift publica- 
tions are awarded annually by the American Insti- 
tute of History of Pharmacy for superior achieve- 
ment in pharmacohistorical study or activity. 

American Pharmaceutical Association Award. A 
plaque provided by the McKesson Company is 
presented annually to the graduate who has made 
the most significant contribution to the Student 



American Pharmaceutical Association at 
Duquesne University. 

Bernard and Blanche Schiller Award in the 
Humanities and Social Sciences. Annually an 
award of $50 provided by The Drug House, Inc., 
Allegheny Division, is presented to the graduate 
who has demonstrated an understanding of the 
value of the humanities and social sciences in his 
development as a professional person. This award 
is to be used for the purchase of books on any 
aspect of the humanities in which the student is 
interested. 

Mary McPartland Beck Award. An award of $25 
is presented annually to the graduate who has 
shown outstanding ability and interest in the 
clinical practice of pharmacy. 

Bristol Award. An award is presented annually 
by the Bristol Laboratories, Inc., Syracuse, NY, to 
a Doctor of Pharmacy candidate for excellence in 
scholastic achievement. 

Bristol Award. A copy of a standard reference 
book is awarded annually by the Bristol Laborato- | 
ries, Inc., Syracuse, NY, to the graduate who has 
in the opinion of the faculty attained unusual dis- 
tinction in the work of pharmaceutical 
administration. 

The Drug House, Inc., Allegheny Division 
Award. Annually an award of $50 is presented to 
the graduate who has shown outstanding ability 
and interest in the fields of medical microbiology 
and pharmacognosy. 

Faculty Award. The faculty of the School of 
Pharmacy may present an appropriate award to an 
outstanding member of the graduating class who 
has displayed exceptional qualities of academic 
excellence and a QPA of over 3.75. 

Maurice H. Finkelpearl Award. An award of $50 
is presented annually to a student who intends to 
practice Community Pharmacy. 

Galen Society Award. The Galen Society of 
Pittsburgh annually offers two $25 awards to the 
two members of the graduating class who have 
achieved the highest standing in the departments 
of pharmacology and pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Samuel W. Curtis Award. Annually an award of 
$25 is presented to the graduate who has shown 
outstanding ability and interests in the field of 
pharmaceutics. 

McNeil Dean's Award. A replica of an Early 
American Mortar and Pestle is awarded annually 
to an outstanding student of Pharmacy 
Administration. 

Lilly Achievement Award. A gold medal is 
presented annually to a member of the graduating 
class who has demonstrated superior scholastic 
and professional achievement as well as qualities 
of leadership. 

Merck Sharp and Dohme Award. Each year 
Merck and Company, Rahway, New Jersey, offers 
a set of valuable reference books to a member of 



125 



the graduating class who attains the highest aver- 
age in medicinal chemistry. 

Rho Chi Award. Alpha Chapter of Rho Chi 
awards annually a suitably inscribed key to the 
student who earns the highest general average in 
all subjects during the first two years of the 
pharmacy program. It is presented at a meeting of 
the Student Chapter of the American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. 

Roche Pharmacy Communications Award. A 
personalized plaque is awarded annually to the 
graduating student who has shown exceptional 
ability in patient communication through course- 
work and application. 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories Award. A 
personalized plaque is presented annually by the 
Smith Kline & French Laboratories, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, for superior achievement in 
Clinical Pharmacy. 

Student American Pharmaceutical Association 
Award. Annually a certificate of recognition is 
presented to the graduating student who has 
demonstrated through service, reporting and 
activity, an avid interest in organization work. 

Syntex Preceptor of the Year Award. An appro- 
priately designed plaque is awarded annually by 
the Syntex Laboratories, Inc., of Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia to the preceptor who, in the opinion of the 
Pharmacy Interns, best exemplifies professional- 
ism, ethics, and clinical practice. 

Upjohn Award. A suitably inscribed plaque 
awarded annually by the Upjohn Company, 
Kalamazoo, Michigan, for outstanding public 
service. 

Western Pennsylvania Society of Hospital Phar- 
macists Award. Annually an award of $50 is 
presented to the graduating senior who demon- 
strates outstanding ability and interest in the area 
of Hospital Pharmacy. 

Lemmon Company Award. A certificate and 
award of $150 to the graduating senior who has 
completed the degree program through unusual 
and extraordinary perserverance and determina- 
tion in the opinion of the graduating class. 

Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical Association 
Award. A certificate of recognition and one-year 
membership in the PPA awarded annually to the 
graduate who has been most actively involved in 
pharmacy organizations. 

J. Cornetti Tucci Memorial Award. An award of 
$100 is presented to the graduating student who 
had demonstrated excellence in pharmaceutics. 

Sandoz Doctor of Pharmacy Award. A com- 
memorative plaque and $100 which is provided 
by Sandoz, Inc., East Hanover, NJ, is awarded 
annually to an outstanding Doctor of Pharmacy 
graduate. 

Fisher Scientific Award for Outstanding Medical 
Technology Student. A personalized plaque is 



presented annually to the graduating Medical 
Technology student who achieved the highest 
standing during the four-year program of study. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

A committee of the faculty will review the 
record of each candidate for graduation to ascer- 
tain full compliance with specific School of 
Pharmacy curricula requirements and the general 
University Graduation Requirements, as stated in 
Academic Policies section of this catalog. This 
committee will then recommend candidates for 
faculty certification for graduation or for remedial 
work to be fulfilled during the last semester of 
residence. Communications pertaining to this cer- 
tification may be entered in the Office of the Dean. 

STATE LICENSING 
PENNSYLVANIA 

A candidate for licensure as a Registered Phar- 
macist in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
must meet the following requirements before he 
may be admitted to the licensing examinations 
which are conducted by the Pennsylvania State 
Board of Pharmacy: 

1 . Character — be of good moral character. 

2. Professional Training — have a degree in 
Pharmacy granted by a School or College of 
Pharmacy, which is accredited by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education. 

3. Practical Experience and Internship — any 
person enrolled as a student of pharmacy in an 
accredited college may at the end of the second 
year of college file with the Pennsylvania State 
Board of Pharmacy an application for registration 
as a pharmacy intern. 

To insure proficiency in the practical aspects of 
pharmacy, the State Board shall by regulation pre- 
scribe internship requirements which must be sat- 
isfactorily completed prior to issuance of a Phar- 
macist's License. 

Specific information concerning practical expe- 
rience requirements as well as all other require- 
ments concerning licensure may be obtained from 
the State Board of Pharmacy, Department of 
State, Box 2649, Transportation and Safety Bldg., 
6th Floor, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17120. 

STATES OTHER THAN PENNSYLVANIA 

According to law, the licensing of an applicant 
seeking to become registered as a pharmacist is 
under the sole jurisdiction of the state in which he 
seeks to practice. Although the requirements for 
licensure in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
are similar to those of other states, differences may 
exist. Space limitations preclude a complete listing 
of the requirements of other states and the District 
of Columbia. The candidate for licensure in 
another state is advised to consult the Board of 
Pharmacy in that particular state for complete and 
current information. 



126 



CAREER GUIDANCE CENTER 

A Guidance Center has been established within 
the School of Pharmacy to keep students informed 
about the latest career opportunities available to 
those possessing a pharmacy education and to 
attract high school and college students to the 
profession. 

The Center consists of faculty members, School 
of Pharmacy alumni, and pharmacy practitioners. 
It provides upon request speakers for career day 
programs and information to high school counsel- 
ors on all matters relating to a pharmacy educa- 
tion and career. 

Pamphlets containing career information on 
pharmacy are also available through the Guidance 
Center. Inquiries should be directed to the 
Pharmacy Career Guidance Center, School of 
Pharmacy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 15282. 

RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

The Hugh C. Muldoon and Pharmacy Alumni 
Foundation of Duquesne University, established 
in 1950 to celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of 
the founding of the School of Pharmacy, is an 
increasingly valuable aid in helping to achieve the 
aims of the University and of the School of 
Pharmacy. The foundation provides funds for 
improving the instructional and research facilities 
of the School; it assists in the advancement of 
pharmacy by supporting the training of undergrad- 
uate and graduate students in industrial and 
research procedures; it helps to extend the knowl- 
edge from research being conducted under the aus- 
pices of the School. Contributions are solicited 
from graduates and others interested in the work 
of the Foundation. They may be addressed in care 
of the School of Pharmacy. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

The courses of instruction are numbered in accor- 
dance with a plan uniform throughout the 
University. 

University courses numbered 100 are Freshman 
courses; 200 Sophomore; 300 Junior; 400 Senior. 
Courses described in this section are required 
courses in the professional curriculum and those 
courses offered by the School of Pharmacy faculty 
as a University service. Courses numbered 500 are 
graduate level courses in which qualified under- 
graduate students may be enrolled with the per- 
mission of the instructor of the course. Credit for 
these courses cannot be used to satisfy require- 
ments for a second degree. Most courses in the 800 
series are generally restricted to Doctor of 
Pharmacy candidates. 

DEPARTMENT OF 
PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 
AND PHARMACEUTICS 

Chairman: Mitchell L. Borke, Ph.D. 



101. Pharmacy Orientation. 1 cr. 

Introduction to the profession of pharmacy. Dis- 
cussion of various aspects of pharmacy education 
and professional practice. Pharmaceutical organi- 
zations are discussed and evaluated. The pharma- 
ceutical literature is reviewed and a brief history of 
pharmacy is presented. Lecture, one hour. 

301. Basic Pharmaceutics — 

Pharmacy Math I. 4 cr. 

A study of the basic physiochemical principles 
applicable to an understanding of drugs and the 
pharmaceutical systems in which they are con- 
tained. Subject areas include: solubility and solu- 
tions; pH; diffusion; osmocity; drug stability, pack- 
aging, storage and administration; physio- 
cochemical evaluation of pharmaceutical prod- 
ucts; the clinical applications of pharmaceutics. 
Mathematical methodologies (algebraic and 
graphical) relevant to modern pharmaceutical 
practice are integrated into both the didactic and 
laboratory portions of the course. Laboratory 
emphasis is on practical and clinical application. 
Prerequisites: Calculus 115. General Physics (one 
semester), Organic Chemistry I, II. Lecture, three 
hours; Recitation, conference, and laboratory, four 
hours. 

302. Basic Pharmaceutics II. 4 cr. 

A continuation of Pharmaceutics I. Prerequisite: 
Pharmaceutics I. Lecture, three hours; Recitation, 
conference, and laboratory, four hours. 

305. Pharmaceutics-Biopharmaceutics III. 3 cr. 

A study of the physio-chemical, biological, and 
pharmaceutical factors which affect absorption, 
distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs 
in man. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of 
biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic knowl- 
edge in problems of bioavailability and bioe- 
qui valence of drug products and in the determina- 
tion of appropriate drug dosage regimens. 
Prerequisite: Basic Pharmaceutics I, II. Lecture, 
three hours. 

306. Pharmaceutics-Pharmacokinetics IV. 4 cr. 

A continuation of Pharmaceutics III with empha- 
sis on pharmacokinetics and on drug delivery sys- 
tems. Prerequisite: Pharmaceutics III. Lecture, 
three hours; Laboratory, four hours. 

309. Biochemistry — Nutrition. 4 cr. 

A course designed to integrate basic biochemistry 
with the application to selected clinical cases. 
Emphasis is placed on metabolism of carbohy- 
drates, lipids and proteins as the source of energy 
derived from foods; certain aspects of nutrition 
are discussed. The function of enzymes, vitamins 
and hormones is presented in relation to their role 
in metabolism. Clinical applications, including 
laboratory tests encountered on patients' charts, 
parenteral nutrition, and pertinent clinical cases 
which illustrate the interrelationship of biochemis- 
try with physiology, are discussed. Prerequisite: 
Organic Chemistry I, II. Lecture, four hours; Lab- 
oratory, two hours. 



127 



310. Analysis of Drug Substances. 4 cr. 

A survey course covering the basic principles of 
analytical chemistry, statistics as applied to mea- 
surement, the analytical process, problem solving 
and data interpretation. Examples used come from 
pharmaceutical manufacturing, clinical and bio- 
chemical analysis, pharmacokinetics, pharmacol- 
ogy and drug therapeutics. Prerequisites: General 
Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, and Biochemistry. 
Lecture, four hours. 

313. Medicinal Chemistry — 

Natural Products I. 4 cr. 

Relationship between chemical structure and the 
biological action of natural and synthetic drug 
molecules. Emphasis is on underlying principles as 
well as on specific therapeutic agents. Organiza- 
tion is by pharmacological classification, with 
chemical properties relating to mechanism of 
action, drug disposition (absorption, distribution, 
metabolism, and excretion) and chemical incom- 
patibilities considered for each class. Prerequisites: 
Organic Chemistry I, II and Biochemistry. Lec- 
ture, four hours. 

314. Medicinal Chemistry — 

Natural Products II. 4 cr. 

A continuation of Medicinal Chemistry I. Lecture, 
four hours. 

365. Analytical Chemistry. 4 cr. 

Rigorous training in stoichiometric relationships 
and in the application of equilibrium principles, 
with laboratory experience in the principal meth- 
ods of gravimetric, volumetric and instrumental 
analysis. Prerequisites: General Chemistry, 
Organic Chemistry. Lecture, three hours; Labora- 
tory, seven hours. 

499. Independent Study 

and Research. 1-2 cr./sem. 

To stimulate interest in furthering a student's edu- 
cation, the School of Pharmacy uses this course as 
a vehicle to provide the means whereby those who 
wish to be involved in a programmed self-study 
educational experience may do so. To accomplish 
this aim, the student in cooperation with a specific 
instructor chosen by the student will develop a 
course of study that will realistically be able to fill 
the learning objectives stated by the student. The 
student and instructor will meet at stipulated regu- 
lar time intervals for guidance and evaluation of 
progress being made by the student. Contact 
School of Pharmacy office for restrictions on total 
credits allowed and on eligibility for registration. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY- 
TOXICOLOGY 

Chairman: Gene A. Riley, Ph.D. 

2. Drug Abuse. 1 cr. 

A course designed to present the pharmacological 
and toxicological properties of substances of 
abuse. The major classes of drugs are described 



with direct reference to toxic and adverse effects. 
The myths and misconceptions commonly attrib- 
uted to some substances of abuse are clarified. The 
philosophy of the course is to present an objective 
picture of the "drug abuse era" in this country. 
The course is intended for all students beginning 
their collegiate studies. Admission to this course 
for students who have completed Pharmacology- 
Drug Mechanisms I or its equivalent is by 
approval of the instructor. Lecture, one hour. 

3. Basic Pharmacology. 3 cr. 

A course dealing with the major classes of thera- 
peutic agents, designed for students with a limited 
background in biological sciences. Drugs are con- 
sidered from a "disease state" point of view and 
include basic mechanisms of action. Important 
drug interactions as they relate to patient care are 
included. Not open to Pharmacy Students. Prereq- 
uisites: Six credits of biological science, including 
physiology. Lecture, three hours. 

4. Social Diseases. 1 cr. 

Causes, course of diseases, prevention, treatment 
and social effects of venereal diseases. Awareness 
and common sense should be awakened in stu- 
dents by the course. Open to students who have 
completed Pharmacology-Drug Mechanisms I 
only with the permission of the instructor. Lec- 
ture, one hour. 

130. History of Pharmacy. 2 cr. 

A survey of the origins of science, medicine, and 
pharmacy from the earliest recorded events to the 
present with emphasis on nineteenth and twenti- 
eth century pharmacy in the United States. Lec- 
ture, two hours. 

220. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. 4 cr. 

A lecture course dealing with the structure and 
function of the various cells, tissues and organ 
systems of the body. Emphasis is on the complexi- 
ties of regulation and integration of function of 
these organ systems. Prerequisites: General Biol- 
ogy I, II. Lecture, four hours. 

317. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. 4 cr. 

A continuation of the Human Anatomy and Phys- 
iology I lecture series, with laboratory. The labora- 
tory portion of the course deals with gross anat- 
omy, a histological study of tissues, and the 
clinical appraisal of physiological functions. Lec- 
ture, three hours; Laboratory, three hours. 

318. Pathophysiology. 3 cr. 

A lecture presentation of the cellular, organ and 
systemic changes associated with the human dis- 
ease process. Also discussed are the physiological 
responses of the body's organ systems to the dis- 
ease process and the contribution these responses 
make to the production of signs and symptoms 
that are normally associated with each disease 
state. Prerequisites: Human Anatomy and Physi- 
ology I, II. Lecture, three hours. 



128 



319. Medical Microbiology- 
Immunology. 4 cr. 

Covers the general characteristics and morphology 
of bacteria, the important staining techniques, 
methods of growing bacteria on artificial media, 
testing the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on 
pathogenic bacteria, and immunology. It includes 
discussions of the important bacterial, rickettsial, 
bedsonial, viral, and protozoal diseases along with 
worm infestations, their causes, symptoms, and 
treatment. Lecture, three hours; Laboratory, three 
hours. 

321. Pharmacology-Drug Mechanisms I. 4 cr. 

A course in the mechanisms and pharmacody- 
namic actions of drugs. Side effects, toxicity, drug 
interactions and the rational for therapeutic use in 
relation to drug mechanism and actions are 
stressed. Prerequisites: Human Anatomy and 
Physiology I, II and Pathophsiology. Lecture, four 
hours. 

322. Pharmacology-Drug Mechanisms II. 4 cr. 

A continuation of Pharmacology-Drug Mecha- 
nisms I. Lecture, four hours. 

323. OTC Drugs. 2 cr. 

A course designed to familiarize students with the 
pharmacological and toxicological properties of 
over-the-counter drugs. The course will prepare 
the student to counsel the public on the appropri- 
ate use of OTC drugs, to select the proper non- 
prescription drug for a particular disease state, and 
to determine if treatment with a non-prescription 
drug is appropriate. Prerequisites: Pharmacology- 
Drug Mechanisms I, II. Lecture, two hours. 

324. Public Health-Emergency Treatment. 3 cr. 

A discussion of public health measures such as 
immunization, water purification, sewage dispo- 
sal, disinfection of individuals and objects, control 
of rodents and insects, and the relationship of 
these to the spread of disease. Health statistics, 
disaster preparedness, and the health effects of 
environmental pollutants are also discussed. In 
the first aid portion, the course teaches how to 
render first aid in cases of emergency, while await- 
ing the arrival of a physician. Special emphasis is 
placed on emergencies which the pharmacist is 
most likely to experience: epileptic seizures, heart 
attacks, fainting, diabetic coma, and others. Lec- 
ture, three hours. 

DEPARTMENT OF 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

ADMINISTRATION 

Chairman: Anthony J. Amadio, M.B.A. 
230. Pharmacy Law. 3 cr. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the 
philosophy of law and its relationship to 
pharmacy. Federal, state, and local laws and regu- 
lations pertinent to the handling and sale of drugs, 
cosmetics, narcotics, poisons, and alcohol are dis- 
cussed. A review of antitrust laws, trade regula- 
tions, and court decisions of importance to the 



pharmacist is included. Elements of business law 
and civil responsibilities of the pharmacist are also 
covered. Lecture, three hours. 

262. International Health Issues. 3 cr. 

The course will explore factors that influence 
health care in diverse countries. Topics covered 
include: a comparison of health services; the use of 
regional planning by groups of small countries; 
prevention and control of specific diseases with 
special emphasis on communicable diseases; pri- 
mary health care; the role of international agencies 
from the perspective of developed and developing 
countries; the constitutional, administrative and 
financial influences on health care; health priori- 
ties in the context of general needs. Lecture, three 
hours. 

325. Pharmacy Management. 4 cr. 

A course designed to familiarize students with the 
fundamentals of personnel, inventory, and finan- 
cial management decisions with the overall objec- 
tive of improving pharmacy practice efficiency. 
Lecture, four hours. 

326. Pharmacy Administration. 3 cr. 

A course designed to familiarize the student with 
the diverse social, political, economic, and legal 
forces affecting the practice of pharmacy. The 
course considers the persons, places, and activities 
involved in providing health care services with 
special emphasis on the role of the community 
pharmacist. Lecture, three hours. 

430. Patient Counseling and Education. 3 cr. 

A course designed to examine current counseling 
and communication techniques in terms of how 
they relate to patient education regarding personal 
health problems and compliance with medication 
regimens. The course will examine in detail basic 
interviewing techniques. Lecture, two hours; Lab- 
oratory, two hours. 

431. Behavioral Aspects of Illness. 2 cr. 

A course designed to examine the current theory 
and research in the psycho-social correlates and 
consequences of illness and health. Topics will 
include the general areas of social stress research, 
theories of psycho-somatic medicine, the impact 
of social environment upon health, and the impact 
of illness upon the emotional and social function- 
ing of the person. Prerequisite: Introductory 
course in sociology and/or psychology is highly 
recommended. Lecture, two hours. 

432. Practical Pharmacy II — Community. 3 cr. 

Required of all final-year Pharmacy students and 
involving placement in an operating community 
pharmacy with a pharmacist-preceptor. Off-cam- 
pus placement is necessary. Note: Calendar change 
for fifth-year Pharmacy students may be required. 

433. Practical Pharmacy III — Hospital. 3 cr. 

Required of all final-year Pharmacy students and 
involving placement in an operating hospital 



pharmacy with a pharmacist-preceptor. Off-cam- 
pus placement is necessary. Note: Calendar change 
for fifth-year Pharmacy students may be required. 

434. Practical Pharmacy IV — Optional. 3 cr. 

Required of all final-year Pharmacy students and 
involving placement in an operating pharmacy or 
related practice setting with a pharmacist-precep- 
tor. Off-campus placement is necessary. Note: Cal- 
endar change for fifth-year Pharmacy students 
may be required. 

481. Pharmacy Sales and Marketing. 2 cr. 

An introduction to the pharmaceutical manufac- 
turer's role in marketing drug products. The con- 
cepts, elements, and functions involved in the dis- 
tributive chain between the manufacturer of the 
drug and the ultimate user are considered. Lec- 
ture, two hours; Practicum, one hour. 

482. Community Pharmacy Practice. 3 cr. 

The course considers the operational aspects of a 
community pharmacy with emphasis on the busi- 
ness or commercial matters pertinent to a success- 
ful operation. Lecture, three hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL 
PHARMACY 

Chairman: Thomas J. Mattei, Pharm. D. 

333. Drug Literature Resources. 1 cr. 

This course is intended to acquaint the student 
with various drug information resources and how 
to appropriately utilize these references in 
responding to information requests. The course 
will review the primary and secondary literature, 
indexing and abstracting systems, the systematic 
search process, principles of literature evaluation, 
and the approach for answering common drug 
information questions. Lecture, one hour; Labora- 
tory, one hour. 

440. Therapeutics. 6 cr. 

A course designed to provide the student with the 
information necessary to demonstrate competency 
related to the therapeutic principles of selected dis- 
ease states. Prerequisites: Pharmacology-Drug 
Mechanisms I, II and Medicinal Chemistry- 
Naturals Products I, II. Lecture, six hours. 

441. Practical Pharmacy I — 

Clinical Clerkship. 3 cr. 

An educational process designed to provide the 
student with clinical experiences necessary to 
demonstrate competency in the areas of providing 
patient education, ascertaining drug histories, par- 
ticipating in the selection and monitoring of thera- 
. peutic modalities, and other pharmacist-related 
functions. The fifth-year Pharmacy student will be 
assigned to a member of the clinical faculty and a 
given practice site. Note: Calendar change for fifth- 
year Pharmacy students may be required. 



129 



491. Hospital Pharmacy Management. 3 cr. 

A course designed to introduce the student to hos- 
pital pharmacy resource management and to ser- 
vices frequently associated with hospital 
pharmacy. Lecture, three hours. 

814. Parenteral Therapy. 3 cr. 

A lecture/laboratory course designed to present 
the principles of sterilization, aseptic processing 
and membrane filtration in the preparation of par- 
enteral products and intravenous admixtures in 
pharmacy practice. Emphasis on the principles of 
fluid and electrolyte therapy; acid-base balance 
and total parenteral nutrition is included in lec- 
ture. Lecture, three hours; Pre-laboratory and lab- 
oratory/demonstration. 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL 
TECHNOLOGY 

Director: Jeanne A. Cooper, M.D. Education 
Coordinator: M. Elaine Linkhauer, M.T. 
(ASCP) 

61. Clinical Chemistry. 7 cr. 

A comprehensive study of the chemistry and 
metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and 
electrolyte, enzyme, and hormone systems as 
revealed by the various examinations performed 
on blood and other body fluids. 

62. Urinalysis. 2 cr. 

The study of renal function and its abnormalities 
as portrayed by alterations in the composition of 
the urine. 

63. Hematology 5 cr. 

Detailed study of the anatomy and physiology of 
the blood and various laboratory methods used in 
establishing inherited or acquired abnormalities of 
blood and blood forming organs. 

64. Blood Banking. 3 cr. 

Essentials and importance of proper selection of 
blood for transfusion, pretesting methods, records, 
and administration of blood. Also included are 
studies of tests pertaining to isosensitization. 

65. Bacteriology. 5 cr. 

The study of clinical bacteriology, including cul- 
ture methods, biochemical and immunological 
aspects of identification, and the application of 
these to the disease state. 

66. Parasitology. 2 cr. 

Methods of identification of the various parasites 
infesting man, with detailed study of their mor- 
phology and habit. 

67. Immunology. 2 cr. 

Study of the procedures used in analysis of 
immune mechanisms of the body, and their appli- 
cation in disease processes. 

69. Mycology. 1 cr. 

The study of the pathogenic fungi, the diseases 
they cause, and the technical methods of identifi- 
cation. 



130 

70. Virology. 



1 cr. 



The study of the viruses causing disease and the 
technical methods of identification. 



71. Nuclear Pathology. 2 cr. 

The study of the use of radioisotopes in the diag- 
nosis and treatment of disease. 



DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGICAL 
HEALTH 

Chairman: Mitchel L. Borke, Ph.D. 



451. Practice in Radiological Health. 



4 cr. 



Designed to provide the student with practical 
experience in at least four broad areas of radiologi- 
cal health; industrial, hospital, reactor, and unver- 
sity. This experience will be acquired through 
observation and participation in daily practical 
problems of radiation protection within local orga- 
nizations representative of the four broad areas of 
radiological health. Emphasis will be placed on 
personnel monitoring and dosimetry, radiochemi- 
cal assaying of biological and environmental 
materials, field surveying of plant operations 
involving large quantities of fission products and 
other radioactive materials, environmental moni- 
toring practices, decontamination procedures, and 
radiation protection record keeping. Prerequisites: 
Bionucleonics 539; Radiological Health 541; Co- 
requisite: Radiological Health 542. Laboratory, 16 
hours. 



539. Bionucleonics. 



3cr. 



A study of the fundamental techniques of manipu- 
lation and measurement of radioisotopes. Experi- 
ments performed individually by each student 
include: measurement of radioactivity with G-M 
counters, flow counters, ionization chambers, pro- 
portional counters, crystal and liquid scintillators; 
study of the characteristics of radiation, gamma 
spectrometry; some applications of radioisotopes 
in pharmacy, chemistry, biology, etc. Prerequi- 
sites: General Chemistry, General Physics. Lec- 
ture, three hours; Laboratory, three hours. 



540. Advanced Bionucleonics and 
Radiopharmaceuticals 



3cr. 



A course devoted to the practical applications of 
radioactive isotopes in chemistry, biology, 
pharmacy, and medicine. The scope of the course 
includes neutron activation analysis, gamma spec- 
trometry, tracer methods, and radiopharmaceuti- 
cals. Prerequisite: Bionucleonics 539. Lecture, 
three hours; Laboratory, three hours. 



541, 542. Radiological Health I and II. 4 cr. each 

A course designed to review the fundamental 
physical and biological principles of radiation pro- 
tection, and the application of these principles to 
the measurement techniques, radiation hazard 
evaluation, radiation protection surveillance and 
administration. Scientific principles most applica- 
ble to solving the problems of protecting humans 
from unacceptable levels of radiation exposure 
both in occupational and public environment are 
emphasized. Lecture, three hours; Laboratory, 
four hours. 

RECOMMENDED PROFESSIONAL 
ELECTIVES 

The following courses offered by the Graduate 
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences are avail- 
able to qualified upperclassmen in the School of 
Pharmacy. 

501. Manufacturing Pharmacy. 

502. Pharmaceutical Formulation and 
Development. 

504. Industrial Pharmacy and 
Governmental Affairs. 

510. Advanced Pharmacokinetics I. 

522. Spectral Methods. 

523, 524. Advanced Medicinal 

Chemistry I and II. 

539. Bionucleonics. 

540. Advanced Bionucleonics and 
Radiopharmaceuticals. 

541. 542. Radiological Health I and II. 

560. Biosynthesis of Natural Products. 

561. General Toxicology. 
563. Pathology. 

566. Clinical Toxicology. 

569. Toxins. 

Descriptions of these courses may be found in the 
Graduate School of Liberal Arts and Sciences Cat- 
alog. 



RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES FOR 
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

107. Medical Ethics. 

101. Survey of Sociology. 

323. Medical Sociology. 

103. Introduction to Psychology. 

305. History of Medicine. 

307, 308. History of Science. 

204. Interpersonal Communications. 

121. Elements of Economics. 



RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES FOR 
RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH 

106. Logic. 

104. Introduction to Philosophy. 

105. Ethics. 

107. Medical Ethics. 

101. Introduction to Political Science. 

312. International Law and Organization. 

103. Introduction to Psychology. 

101. Survey of Sociology. 

323. Medical Sociology. 

201, 202. English Literature Survey. 

103, 104. Development of the United States. 

305. History of Medicine. 

307, 308. History of Science. 

204. Interpersonal Communications. 

121. Elements of Economics. 

203. Genetics. 

206. Environmental Biology. 



ELECTIVES— COURSE CLUSTERS 

The following courses in liberal arts and sciences 
were especially selected by the several depart- 
ments to support and complement pharmacy pro- 
grams. Students are encouraged to view these elec- 
tives with the aim of providing an appropriate 
depth of knowledge in the areas. Each cluster is 
intended to offer an interesting sequence of elec- 
tives that will count toward minimum elective 
requirements of all programs in the School. 

Department of English — 

1) 201, 202. English Literature Survey. 

2) 205, 206. American Literature Survey. 

3) 210, 21 1. World Literature Survey. 

4) Special Studies in English or World 
Literature. 

5) 207, 208, 209. Study of Literary Form. 

6) English Honors Program 12 credits. 

7) All 12 credits minors listed by the Depart- 
ment in the current catalog. 



131 

Department of History — 

1) 305. History of Medicine. 307, 308. History 
of Science. 

2) 103, 104. Development of the U.S.; 309. 
American Science and Technology. 

3) World History, Western Civilization. 

4) Non-American History Sequence. 

Department of Classics — 

1) 121 or 122, 123, 245, 246, 240. Greek 
Civilization. 

2) 121 or 122, 123, 246, 247, 248, 241. Roman 
Civilization. 

3) 245, 246, 247, 248. Ancient History. 

4) 103, 104, 203, 204, 301, 302, 303. Greek 
Language and Literature. 

5) 101, 102, 201, 202, 305, 306. Latin Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

Department of Sociology — 

1) 101, any one of areas of concentration sug- 
gested under minor. 

Department of Psychology — 

1) 103, courses suggested under minor. 

Department of Speech Communication — 
1) Courses suggested under minor. 

Department of Philosophy — 

1) 104, 105 or 107, 106. 

2) Courses suggested under minor. 

Department of Political Science — 

1) 101, courses suggested under minor. 

Department of Theology — 

1 ) Courses suggested under minor. 

Fine Arts — 

1) Courses suggested under minor. 

Any course taught in the University may be cho- 
sen as an elective course by students who have 
met the prerequisites. Descriptions for courses 
outside the School of Pharmacy may be found in 
the appropriate section of the University catalog. 



132 



Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

(ARMY OFFICERS' COMMISSIONING PROGRAM) 

PROGRAMS 



The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
(ROTC) Program has been a member of the 
"Duquesne Family'" since 1936. It is a completely 
voluntary program which is open to all male and 
female students at Duquesne. It provides students 
with the opportunity to earn a commission as an 
officer in the US Army, US Army Reserves or 
Army National Guard. After commissioning, stu- 
dents serve as an officer in the Reserves or 
National Guard while pursuing their chosen civil- 
ian careers or compete for active duty. The pro- 
gram is structured to give the student a variety of 
practical experiences in leading and managing 
people and resources while learning about the miU 
itary profession and the role it plays in our system 
of government. Four-year and two-year programs 
are offered, both of which are taken in conjunction 
with a student's required or normal course of 
study leading to a degree. 



FOUR YEAR 

The four-year program is divided into two parts: 
the Basic Course and the Advanced Course. The 
Basic Course is usually taken in the freshman and 
sophomore years during which time the student 
would take ROTC courses as they would any other 
college courses. There is no military service obliga- 
tion or special requirements of any kind. The 
freshmen and sophomore courses follow an 
adventure, skill learning and leadership track 
which is designed to enhance self-confidence, pro- 
vide new experiences, and place students in realis- 
tic leadership situations. Freshmen learn survival 
techniques, how to handle and fire a rifle, and how 
to navigate cross-country using a map and a com- 
pass. Sophomores learn about leadership, manage- 
ment and the role of the military in the United 
States. The Basic Course may be compressed into 
less than a two-year period if the student meets 
certain prerequisite conditions. 

Basic Course Curriculum: 



Freshmen (MS I) 



Fall Semester 



MS 101. Survival 

Techniques 
0-1 cr. 



Spring Semester 

MS 102. Individual 
Skills 
0-1 cr. 



Sophomores (MS II) 



Fall Semester 

MS 201. Leadership 
and 
Management 

0-1 cr. 


MS 202. Introduction 
to 

Military 
Skills 
0-1 cr. 



After completing the Basic Course, students who 
have demonstrated officer potential and meet 
Army physical standards are eligible to enroll in 
the Advanced Course. The Advanced Course is 
normally taken in the final two years of college. 
Therefore, at the beginning of the junior year, the 
student must decide whether he/she wishes to 
become an officer and enter the advanced phase of 
the program. Students who enter the Advanced 
Course receive a tax-free living allowance of $100 
per month during the school year. The junior year 
is training-oriented and prepares students for six, 
weeks of rigorous field and leadership training that 
they receive at Fort Bragg, NC at the end of the 
academic year. The senior year further prepares 
the student to perform the duties of an officer. It 
covers such subjects as military law, administra- 
tion, logistics, staff functions, professionalism, eth- 
ics, and military training. Leadership development 
is continuously emphasized. 

Advanced Course Curriculum: 

Juniors (MS III) 



Fall Semester 

MS 301. Military 
Skills 

Development 
0-2 cr. 



Spring Semester 

MS 302. Military 
Skills 

Development 
0-2 cr. 



Summer Between Junior and Senior Year 

Attend a six-week ROTC Advanced Camp 

Seniors (MS IV) 



\ 



Fall Semester 



MS 401 



Professional 
Seminar 
0-2 cr. 



Spring Semester 

MS 401. Professional 
Seminar 
0-2 cr. 



DIRECT ENTRY INTO THE 
ADVANCED COURSE 

Students may receive placement credit for MS I 
and II and be granted direct entry into the 
Advanced Course. This placement credit may be 
granted for: 

1. Completion of Army Basic Training or its 
equivalent in the Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard or 
Marine Corps. 






2. Attendance at a service academy for one or 
more years. 

3. Completion of equivalent level training in 
Navy or Air Force ROTC. 

4. Completion of three or more years training in 
Junior ROTC (any service) or NDCC. 

EARLY COMMISSIONING 

Many students are able to complete the require- 
ments for commissioning prior to graduation 
through the direct entry concept. These students 
may be commissioned upon completion of the 
Advanced Course, permitting them to serve in sal- 
aried positions with the National Guard or 
Reserves while completing their degree work. 

SIMULTANEOUS MEMBERSHIP 
PROGRAM (SMP) 

This program permits students to participate in 
the Army ROTC Advanced Course and serve in a 
Reserve or National Guard unit as an officer 
trainee at the same time. The advantage to SMP is 
that the student will receive regular drill pay from 
the Reserve or National Guard as well as the $100 
per month living allowance for participating in the 
Army ROTC. 

TWO-YEAR PROGRAM 

This two-year program is designed primarily for 
transfer students and students who did not partici- 
pate in ROTC as freshmen or sophomores. Any 
student with at least two academic years remain- 
ing (undergraduate and/or graduate) is eligible. 
Students may qualify for this program and enroll- 
ment in the Advanced Course by successfully 
completing a paid summer camp at Fort Knox, 
KY. 

ARMY ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS 

Army ROTC offers four, three, and two-year 
scholarships which are awarded on a competitive 
basis. ROTC students as well as those students not 
currently participating in ROTC are eligible to 
apply. Each scholarship pays for tuition, text- 
books, laboratory fees and other purely academic 
expenses. Scholarship students also receive a tax- 
free living allowance of $100 each month during 
the school year while on scholarship status. For 
details, see the ROTC Scholarship listing in the 
Financial Aid Section of this catalog on page 222. 

MILITARY SCIENCE CURRICULUM 

THE BASIC COURSE 

(Military Science Levels I and II). 

Military Science (MS) 101. Survival Techniques. 

This is an introductory course designed to prepare 
students to recognize survival situations, deter- 
mine directions, navigate at night, rappel, find and 
prepare food, find water, apply first aid, cross 
>r obstacles and construct shelters. 



133 



Military Science (MS) 102. Individual Skills. 

The course will provide an introduction to the 
sport of orienteering, which is a combination of 
cross-country running and land navigation with 
the aid of a topographical map and a compass. 
Instruction is presented on map reading, the use of 
the compass, and how to move quickly and safely 
through all kinds of terrain. 

Military Science (MS) 201. Leadership and 
Management Techniques. 

This is an introductory course into basic manage- 
ment and leadership techniques and includes 
effective communications techniques, small group 
processes, leadership traits and styles, decision- 
making and problem-solving techniques. The 
course is also designed to provide the student with 
the tools for a self-analysis of his/her management 
capability and the methods for improvement. 

Military Science (MS) 202. Introduction to 
Military Skills. 

This course introduces the student to the United 
States Army and provides an inside view of 
ROTC and the Army, to include its organization, 
missions, and functions. The course will discuss 
officer career fields, duties and responsibilities of 
junior leaders, additional education programs, 
pay, promotion, assignments, customs and tradi- 
tions of the Army, and the significance of military 
courtesy and discipline. The student will also be 
introduced to the operation of the basic military 
team — the squad. 

THE ADVANCED COURSE 
(Military Science Levels III and IV) 

Military Science (MS) 301 and 302. 
Military Skills Development. 

This course requires a full school year to complete. 
In addition to the two hours per week of instruc- 
tion and practical application exercises on cam- 
pus, the student periodically attends training exer- 
cises on weekends throughout the school year. The 
course provides the student with instruction and 
practical experience in tactical and technical mili- 
tary subjects with particular emphasis on leader- 
ship development. The central theme and primary 
purpose of the course is to prepare the student for 
attendance at the six-week ROTC Advanced 
Camp at Fort Bragg, NC which is normally 
attended during the summer following the comple- 
tion of this course. 

Military Science (MS) 401 and 402. 
Professional Seminar. 

To take this course, the student must have satis- 
factorily completed MS 301 and 302 as well as 
ROTC Advanced Camp. The course meets two 
hours per week and is a systematic and compre- 
hensive study of professional subject matters 
designed to facilitate the transition from student/ 
cadet to officer. It is comprised of two modules. 



134 



Module I (MS 401), Administrative/Staff Opera- 
tions and Procedures, is taught in the fall semester. 
Module II (MS 402), Military Law and Justice, is 
taught in the spring semester. 

THE COMMON HOUR 

Military Science (MS) 100. Cadet Corps Labora- 
tory. The Common Hour and Cadet Corps Labo- 
ratory are synonymous. This class is scheduled 
both semesters, meeting once a week for one hour. 
The Cadet Commander uses the lab to dissemi- 
nate information and to organize the activities of 
the Corps of Cadets. All students are required to 
attend unless a conflict exists between this class 
and their academic course work. 

VOLUNTARY ADVENTURE AND 
SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 

In an Urban environment, it is not possible to 
provide students with the kind of surroundings 



suitable for the conduct of such activities as rap- 
pelling and small unit tactics. Therefore, off-cam- 
pus sites on weekends are utilized in order to effec- 
tively apply techniques taught in the classroom. 
Weekend activities are student run and instructor 
supervised. For this reason, these activities are 
ideally suited for cadets to practice leadership and 
organizational and military technical skills. 
Some weekday or weekend evenings are set aside 
for social activities which incorporate exposure to 
military customs and traditions. These events 
include a Dining-In, the Military Ball, an Awards 
Ceremony, and the Annual ROTC Commission- 
ing Program. 




135 



Part III: 

Student Life: Programs, 

Services and Organizations 



A. DIVISION OF STUDENT LIFE 
MISSION 

The mission of the Division of Student Life is to 
establish and maintain a total living, learning and 
developmental environment that will enhance stu- 
dents' growth for individual self-actualization and 
positive involvement in the world community. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Consistent with the educational philosophy of the 
University and the above stated mission, the Stu- 
dent Life Division provides the student with 
opportunities to participate in a variety of experi- 
ences with fellow students, faculty members and 
administrators. The Student Life Staff encourages 
students to initiate new programs, implement 
change and participate in the essential processes of 
University governance on many levels. 

ORGANIZATION 

The Vice President for Student Life and his Assis- 
tant coordinate the Departments of Athletics, 
Career Planning and Placement, Dean of Students 
Office, Duquesne Union, Health Services, Resi- 
dence Life, Retention and Testing. These Depart- 
ments are briefly described below. Additional 
information may be obtained directly from each 
Department and through the Student Handbook 
and Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and 
Conduct. 

ATHLETICS 

Duquesne University is a member of the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association (Division I) and 
the Atlantic 10 Conference. All rules of these two 
organizations, including those pertaining to a stu- 
dent's eligibility for a varsity team, are followed. 
Duquesne University believes in and promotes 
the concept of the student athlete, manifested in 
part by the appointment of the Academic Supervi- 
sor for Intercollegiate Athletics. Athletic grants-in- 
aid are available for most varsity sports. 

The Athletic Department fields men's varsity 
teams in baseball, basketball, cross-country, foot- 
ball (Division III), swimming, tennis and volley- 
ball; women's varsity teams in basketball, softball, 
swimming, tennis and volleyball; coed varsity 
teams in golf and rifle; and club teams in bowling 
and hockey. 

Duquesne sponsors a very active intramural 
program in such fields as tennis, touch football, 
volleyball, chess, street hockey, basketball, soft- 
ball, ultimate frisbee and marathons. 



CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT 

Students and graduates of Duquesne University 
have available to them the full services and pro- 
grams of Career Planning and Placement. Persons 
with uncertain or changing vocational goals may 
seek career planning through personal contact with 
the professional staff and use of the career 
resources. Early use of this service is encouraged. 

The individual with well-defined career goals 
may seek employment advice including resume 
preparation, job application and interview tech- 
niques, job referrals and credentials. The graduat- 
ing student may also be interested in campus 
interviews with visiting imployers. 

Undergraduate students may earn academic 
credit for approved preprofessional work under 
the University's Cooperative Education Program 
which is administered by the Career Planning and 
Placement Office. 

The part-time and summer employment pro- 
gram is important to students in financing their 
education and to those seeking practical experi- 
ence to augment college training. Placement in 
campus jobs is largely, though not totally, depen- 
dent upon financial need. Part-time and summer 
jobs in the community are also available. 

DEAN OF STUDENTS OFFICE 

This office is directly responsible for implementing 
several programs and services which provide indi- 
vidual students and groups with opportunities for 
personal, intellectual and social growth. Chief 
among these programs and services are the Uni- 
versity Judicial System, Orientation, Freshman/ 
Transfer Assistance Program, College Skills, Spe- 
cial Scholarships and Awards, Disabled Student 
Services, Life Planning Seminars, Positive Profile 
Records, Commuter Concerns, National Honor 
Societies and Counseling Services. 

The University Judicial Board plays an impor- 
tant role in developing responsible student con- 
duct, serving to protect the rights and freedoms of 
all students while insuring that these rights and 
freedoms are not misused within the context of 
students' responsibilities to the University. The 
Board, comprised of administrators, faculty, stu- 
dents and a student chairperson, minimizes legal 
technicalities and instead focuses on the develop- 
mental process. 



136 



DUQUESNE UNION 

The Duquesne Union is more than a unique build- 
ing. It is a unique partnership of professional staff, 
faculty and students working together to provide 
the experience necessary to develop mature, effec- 
tive members of society. The Union staff provides 
advice and assistance for all phases of campus pro- 
gramming and establishes goals for, as well as pro- 
ducing and presenting, a balanced series of cul- 
tural, educational, recreational and social 
programs. With the goal of community, all aspects 
of the Union are open to the entire campus. It is 
not the "Student'' Union, but the Duquesne 
Union. 

The Union staff works most closely with the 
Union Program Board, which is the student organ- 
ization exercising primary coordination and 
implementation of University-wide programming 
through a series of special committees. The UPB 
offers its members the opportunity to develop 
effective skills in leadership, communication, 
organization and group process. 

Facilities within the Union include administra- 
tive and student organization offices, meeting 
rooms, information center, recreation center, 
bookstore, cafeteria, video arcade, ballroom, Rath- 
skellar Restaurant and student lounge. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The University Health Service provides primary 
health care to all resident students and to commut- 
ers enrolled in the University Commuter Health 
Plan. Services include evaluation, treatment of ill- 
ness and injury, starter doses of medication, 
allergy injections, diagnostic tests, routine screen- 
ing physicals, health counseling referrals and 
health education materials and programming. 
Additionally emergency care is given to faculty, 
staff and visitors. In addition to Registered Nurses 
and a Nurse Practitioner, the staff includes a 
Board Certified Physician and Consulting Psychia- 
trist. 

Although in-patient facilities and services are 
provided by complete medical centers adjacent to 
and close by Duquesne's Campus, a completely 
equipped ambulance is maintained by the Univer- 
sity. 

It is strongly recommended that each student 
carry some form of health insurance. The Univer- 
sity provides a Student Health Care Plan designed 
to meet the needs of students and which is priced 
lower than individual health insurance policies. 

RESIDENCE LIFE 

The Office of Residence Life is committed to cre- 
ating an environment in each of the four (4) Liv- 
ing Learning Centers in which the student may 
grow and develop as a total person. Its philosophy 
and programs are based on the belief that the Liv- 
ing Learning Center experience is an important 
part of the total University education. Therefore it 
is the purpose of the Office of Residence Life to 
facilitate the personal and academic growth of the 
resident student. To this end, the professional and 



resident assistant staff will provide the means to 
foster such development. 

All freshmen students, except those residing 
with their parents or relatives, are required to live 
in one of Duquesne's Living Learning Centers. All 
students living on campus are further required to 
take their meals at the Residence Cafeteria. Hous- 
ing Agreement terms are effective for the entire 
academic year, with Room and Board rates being 
determined on an annual basis. Additional infor- 
mation regarding programs, policies and regula- 
tions for the Living Learning Centers is included 
in the Residence Life Handbook. 

RETENTION OFFICE 

The Retention Office, under the direction of the 
Vice President for Student Life/Retention, coordi- 
nates the efforts of the entire University commu- 
nity to ensure that the personal and educational 
experience for all students is the best possible. Pol- 
icies, programs, services and opportunities are 
constantly reviewed, refined and improved in an 
effort to meet the legitimate needs of students con- 
sistent with the mission and goals of the Univer- 
sity. 

TESTING BUREAU 

The primary role of the stafff of the Testing 
Bureau is to provide the student with the opportu- 
nity to explore interests and abilities as they per- 
tain to choosing a degree major or minor and plan- 
ning a career. Trained counselors focus upon test 
results and the student's personal style when con- 
sidering the student's questions or concerns. 
Counseling is also available to students whose 
concerns are of a more personal nature, such as 
adjusting to college life, anxiety, etc. Professional 
assistance with study skills, test anxiety and per- 
sonal concerns is available in both individual and 
group counseling formats. Information about the 
applications for national qualification examina- 
tions (CLEP, GRE, LSAT, MAT, SAT, etc.) are 
available at the Testing Bureau. 

B. OTHER DEVELOPMENTAL 
SERVICES 

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

One of the five (5) primary tenets of Duquesne 
University centers on International Education. 
Consistent with this focus, an increasing number 
of International Students from an increasing vari- 
ety of countries are pursuing undergraduate and 
graduate degrees at the University. 

The responsibility of the International Student 
Advisor is to be of service to all International Stu- 
dents in the areas of adjustment, personal counsel- 
ing, preparation of forms and facilitating the inte- 
gration, understanding and communication 
among International Students and American stu- 
dents. Additionally, the International Student 
Advisor coordinates opportunities for Duquesne 
students interested in studying abroad as part of 
their education. 



137 



LEARNING SKILLS PROGRAM 

The Learning Skills Program is an ancillary aca- 
demic service whose primary charge is the intellec- 
tual development of students. Services are pro- 
vided in coordination with academic offices of the 
University. 

As part of its academic assistance efforts, the 
Learning Skills Program delivers diagnostic and 
prescriptive services. Individualized developmen- 
tal programs in reading, writing, mathematics and 
science are offered to students who seek to upgrade 
their academic skills and advance their intellectual 
growth. 

A free tutorial service provides students with 
competent tutors in numerous subject areas. In 
addition, a comprehensive study skills program is 
available to help students prepare study skills as 
well as to assist students experiencing academic 
difficulties. 

PSYCHOLOGICAL CENTER FOR TRAIN- 
ING AND RESEARCH 

The Psychological Center for Training and 
Research is staffed by the Psychology Department 
and is available to students for personal counsel- 
ing. Counseling interviews provide the student 
with an opportunity for personal growth through 
the development of the individual's ability to find 
one's own solutions for difficulties of a personal 
nature. Single conferences or a series of interviews 
in individual or group counseling can be arranged 
at the Center's Office. 

C. STUDENT GOVERNANCE 
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Government Association is a stu- 
dent-created structure designed to provide a forum 
for the expression of student views and interests, 
to maintain academic freedom and responsibility 
and to foster intelligent interest and participation 
in all phases of university life. Two major func- 
tions of the S.G.A. are to serve as student repre- 
sentatives on important University committees 
and to serve as the sole body that recognizes and 
funds student organizations. 

COMMUTER COUNCIL 

The Commuter Council is an officially recognized, 
funded student governmental organization open 
to all students at the University. The purpose of 
the Council is to identify commuter concerns and 
to provide educational, social, and service-ori- 
ented programs for the University's large com- 
muter population. To involve the entire commu- 
nity in its program, the Council works closely with 
the Student Government Association, Residence 
Council, Union Program Board and the adminis- 
tration. 

RESIDENCE COUNCIL 

The Residence Council coordinates Living Learn- 
ing Center activities and is involved with the 



Office of Residence Life in developing and imple- 
menting Living Learning Center policies and pro- 
cedures. All resident students are automatically 
members of Residence Council and are 
encouraged to attend meetings, functions, etc. 
sponsored by the group. 

It is the aim of the Residence Council to serve 
as a link between the resident students and the 
administration. Aside from the council activities, 
representatives of the Residence Council serve on 
the Student Life Advisory Committee and the 
Food Service Committee to provide student input 
for the formulation and review of University poli- 
cies affecting residence living. 

INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL 

The Inter-Fraternity Council serves as a clearing 
house for general fraternity social information and 
as a forum for airing constructive proposals for the 
improvement of the fraternity system. Member- 
ship in the Council is composed of three elected or 
appointed representatives from each of the eight 
member fraternities. The IFC establishes all rules 
governing inter-fraternity sports and regulates 
pledging. 

PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

The Panhellenic Council was established for the 
purpose of strengthening women's fraternities as 
organizations and for promoting cooperation 
among the groups through scholastic, athletic, and 
social activities. Membership in the Panhellenic 
Council is composed of the presidents and elected 
representatives of each of the six women's social 
fraternities. Panhellenic Council establishes all 
rules concerning the rushing and pledging of new 
fraternity members. 

D. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
GENERAL 

There are more than 80 active student organiza- 
tions at Duquesne. Some serve the needs of spe- 
cific interest groups as well as those of residents 
and commuters. Others relate directly to major 
areas of study. Some honor academic achieve- 
ment. Many are formed to meet religious, service 
or social needs and interests. Whatever their pur- 
pose, these organizations and their activities com- 
prise a major part of campus life. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

These societies have as their primary purpose rec- 
ognition of academic excellence and leadership 
achievement and are members of the Association 
of College Honor Societies. 

PROFESSIONAL AND DEPARTMENTAL 

ORGANIZATIONS 

These professional organizations exist to provide 
the fertile ground for the growth of informal 
exchange of ideas pertinent to the students aca- 
demic pursuits. With this purpose in mind, these 
organizations sponsor numerous programs includ- 
ing debates, symposiums, and lectures. 



38 



SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS 

The purpose of these nationally-affiliated organi- 
zations is to provide a high standard of service to 
the campus and local communities while, at the 
same time, developing the leadership qualities of 
and cooperation among each member of the 
organization. With this purpose in mind, service 
organizations sponsor a wide variety of profes- 
sional, service, charitable, and social programs. 

SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Social organizations are composed of college men 
and women who have joined together to enhance 
their identities by sponsoring and promoting 
social, athletic, cultural, and academic events. 
Many of these organizations belong to Inter-Fra- 
ternity Council or Panhellenic Council. 

PERFORMANCE GROUPS 

TAMBURITZANS 

The Duquesne University Tamburitzans were 
founded in 1937 at the University and were the 
first university-based performing folk ensemble in 
the United States. The group takes it name from 
the Tamburitza family of stringed instruments, 
indigenous to the folk cultures of Southeastern- 
Europe. The group exists for the dual purpose of 
preserving and perpetuating the Eastern European 
cultural heritage in the United States and offering 
scholarship opportunities to deserving students. 

THEATRE 

The Red Masquers serves to provide an extracur- 
ricular outlet for students who wish to participate 
in the theatre. Its aim is to provide the University 
and its students with educational and cultural ben- 
efits that accrue from a dramatic program. In line 
with these objectives, the Masquer's program 
offers a variety of stage entertainment — one-act 
plays, musicals, comedies, tragedies. Any 
Duquesne student is eligible for membership. 

MEDIA ORGANIZATIONS 

WDUQ RADIO AND TELEVISION 

The University's radio station (WDUQ — 90.5 
F.M.) and television (closed circuit) provide aca- 
demic support to the individual schools and 
departments through seminars, workshops, labo- 
ratory experience, and extracurricular opportuni- 
ties in communication skills for individuals and 



groups. Most positions on the staff are filled by 
students. The University radio station operates on 
a 25,000 Watt frequency over a radius of seventy 
miles. 

WDRC 

This radio station, purchased by Residence Coun- 
cil and operated by students, provides music and 
announcements in the Duquesne Tower's Cafete- 
ria during the lunch and dinner hours. Students 
interested in being disc jockeys and/or announcers 
on WDRC should contact Residence Council. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Duquesne University Code of Student 
Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct 

The Student Code is the definitive statement of 
standards, policies and procedures regarding stu- 
dent rights and responsibilities, campus organiza- 
tions, student governance, student records, stu- 
dent conduct and the University Judicial System. 
Copies are available at the Duquesne Union Infor- 
mational Center. 

The Duquesne Duke, the University campuus 
newspaper is written and edited by the students 
for the students. It appears every Thursday during 
the academic year except during examination peri- 
ods and holidays, and provides an array of campus 
news, student opinions, editorials and advertise- 
ments. The paper is geared to all members of the 
University: administrators, faculty members, 
employees, and most of all students. Membership 
in the Duquesne Duke is open to all students. 

The Duquesne Magazine is a literary publication, 
published each semester which affords students 
the opportunity to submit writing, artwork and 
photographs. 

L'Espirit Du Due, the yearbook, highlights the 
events of the previous year to remind all graduates 
of their alma mater. It is mailed to all seniors after 
their graduation. 

The Student Handbook contains information 
about the University which concerns the students. 
Copies are available at the Duquesne Union Infor- 
mation Center. 




Part IV: 
Campus Ministry 



139 



The Campus Ministry is deeply concerned with 
the religious life and growth of Duquesne students 
and all campus residents. Its policies and pro- 
grams are oriented to furthering that growth at the 
personal as well as the community level. For Cath- 
olic students, Eucharistic liturgies are celebrated 
daily, and the Sacrament of Reconciliation is 
available by appointment. For all students, 
whatever their faith, the chaplains are available to 
help with spiritual direction, counseling, advice, or 
sympathetic listening. The Campus Ministry pro- 
vides a listing of Sunday services in nearby 
churches or synagogues and referrals can be made 
to introduce the student to the various ministers 



or rabbis in the area. The University Chapel is 
open each day for private prayer and quiet medita- 
tion. It is available too, to groups for specific ser- 
vices of a religious nature. 

The Campus Ministry sees itself at the service of 
all in an open, unstructured, nonthreatening rela- 
tionship and invites the entire Duquesne Commu- 
nity to make use of its services. 

The Ministry's activities are announced by pos- 
ters in residence halls, and almost all other cam- 
pus buildings. Its main office is Room 102 on the 
first floor of the Administration Building, with 
additional offices in Duquesne Towers, Assump- 
tion Hall and St. Martin's dormitories. 




40 



Part V: 

Admission, Financial Aid, 

Tuition and Fees 



Admission 



OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS 

The Office of Admissions is located on the first 
floor of the Administration Building. 

Telephone: (412) 434-6220, 434-6221, 434-6222. 

Office hours: Monday through Friday from 
8:30A.M. to 4:30 P.M. 

POLICY 

It is the policy of Duquesne University to admit 
applicants who are best qualified to profit from 
opportunities which the University offers for intel- 
lectual, spiritual, and social growth. In general, 
admission is based upon past academic perform- 
ance, scholastic ability, and personal characteris- 
tics. Information about religious preference, sex, 
racial characteristics, and ethnic origin is not 
taken into consideration by the Committee on 
Admissions. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. A candidate should have been graduated from 
an approved secondary school in the upper three- 
fifths of the class, and demonstrated exemplary 
personal conduct in that institution. Applicants 
who have not completed four years of high school 
must submit a High School Equivalent Diploma 
issued by their state department of education. 

2. High School curriculum must include 16 
units distributed as follows: four units in English; 
eight units in any combination from the area of 
social studies, language, mathematics, and science; 
and four elective units for which the secondary 
school offers credit toward graduation. In specific 
instances, and at the discretion of the Committee 
on Admissions, the genuine equivalent of these 
requirements may be accepted in lieu of the pre- 
cise requirements specified. (Note: Candidates 
planning to enroll in Pharmacy or Pre-Health pro- 
grams, Medical Technology, Radiological Health, 
or as science or mathematics majors should have 
completed a minimum of seven units in mathe- 
matics and sciences.) 

3. Scores in accordance with the standards 
adhered to by the University must be presented 
for the required College Entrance Examination 
Broad Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the 
American College Testing Program (ACT). (Note: 
for admission to the School of Music, an audition 
is required.) 



EARLY DECISION 

Students who desire Duquesne University as their 
first choice for college should consider the Early 
Decision plan. This plan requires that the student 
apply by November 15 of his/her senior year. The 
student is notified of the decision by December 15, 
and is required to send his/her non-refundable 
deposit within two weeks. This offers the candi- 
date the advantage of knowing of the admissions 
decision early in his/her senior year. 

APPLICATION— NEW FIRST-YEAR 
STUDENTS 

Application should be addressed to the Director of 
Admissions, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 15282. It may be submitted at any 
time during the candidates' senior year up to 
July 1. 
The application procedure is as follows: 

1. Obtain, complete, and file the Application for 
Admission with the Office of Admissions. 

2. Include the $20 non-refundable application 
fee with the application form. International stu- 
dents must pay a $30 non-refundable application 
fee. No application will be processed for consider- 
ation by the Committee on Admissions unless 
accompanied by the required fee. 

3. Request the secondary school principal or 
guidance counselor to submit a transcript of the 
candidate's academic record. A recommendation 
is requested. 

4. Complete the required SAT or ACT examina- 
tion during the spring of junior year and/or fall of 
senior year. It is the personal responsibility of each 
candidate to have test scores forwarded to the 
University. 

5. An interview is highly recommended for pro- 
spective students. Auditions are required for 
School of Music applicants. 

6. Students interested in being considered for 
University Scholarships should submit their appli- 
cation by February 1 of their senior year. 

7. Early Decision Deadline (for students who 
have Duquesne as their first College choice) is 
November 15. Notification will be by December 
15. If accepted under the Early Decision Plan, 
commuting students are asked to submit a non- 



141 



refundable tuition deposit of $100 within two 
weeks. Resident students are asked to submit a 
$250 non-refundable deposit. 

8. Notification of decisions for regular admis- 
sion begin once Early Decision applicants have 
been notified. If accepted, students are asked to 
submit non-refundable tuition deposit of $100 for 
commuters or $250 for resident students by May 1 
of their senior year. International students must 
submit a non-refundable tuition and room and 
board deposit of $650. 

// is the responsibility of the applicant to arrange 
to have all supporting credentials on file with the 
Office of Admissions and Financial Aid Office prior 
to the deadline dates. 

EARLY ADMISSION 

Athough the University believes that most stu- 
dents profit from four years in the secondary 
school, the Early Admission Plan is open to out- 
standing students. This is a plan whereby unusu- 
ally able and mature candidates who have com- 
pleted less than four years of a secondary school 
program may apply for consideration to begin col- 
lege after their junior year. The high school 
diploma is awarded following successful comple- 
tion of their freshman year in college. Two sepa- 
rate interviews are required. Further details may 
be obtained by telephoning or writing to the 
Admissions Office. 

APPLICATION— OTHER CATEGORIES 

// is the responsibility of persons who apply for 
evening study, or as international students, post- 
graduate, readmission students, transfers, tempo- 
rary transfers, and veterans, or for the Summer 
Session to arrange to have all supporting creden- 
tials on file with the Office of Admissions and the 
Financial Aid Office before deadline dates. 

ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATE 
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

All international applicants must meet the admis- 
sions requirements for freshmen and/or tranfer 
candidates as determined by the academic unit in 
which they propose to study. In addition, official 
transcripts of all degrees, diplomas, mark sheets, 
and examination records in original or photostatic 
copies must be sent with certified translations, 
where applicable, from all schools, colleges and 
universities attended, to the Admissions Office. 

A declaration of finances must be submitted 
which has been completed and certified by the 
appropriate persons. Acceptance letters will not be 
issued until the Admissions Office is in receipt of 
this form and approval has been granted. 

If English is the applicant's principal language of 
instruction, SAT results must be submitted. If 
English is not the applicant's native language or 
principal language of instruction, the Test of 



English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)* is 
required unless the applicant has finished one year 
of college in the United States and has successfully 
completed at least 16 semester credit hours and 
demonstrated proficiency in English. All TOEFL 
accepted international students must take English 
diagnostic tests upon arrival at the University, for 
appropriate placement, regardless of the academic 
level of acceptance. If the results of the diagnostic 
examinations indicate the need for remedial work 
in English to assure satisfactory progress in the 
projected plan of study, the student must enroll in 
a course in developmental English during his/her 
first semester at the University. 

A letter of reference from at least one school 
official which contains information on the appli- 
cant's academic, personal and social strengths and 
weaknesses, and, also the length of time the writer 
has known the student is required. 

Admissions decisions will not be made until all 
information has been received, completed and cer- 
tified. 

Upon acceptance, the International Students 
Advisor will issue the necessary documents for 
obtaining a student visa to the United States. To 
complete on-campus registration, international 
students who are admitted should plan to arrive 
one week before the term begins. 

POST-GRADUATES 

Post-graduates are students who already have a 
Bachelor's degree, but desire to take undergradu- 
ate courses at Duquesne. 

A Post-graduate student must submit a Post- 
graduate application to the Division of Continuing 
Education if the Bachelor's degree was received 
from an institution other than Duquesne. If the 
bachelor's degree was received from Duquesne an 
application for readmission must be submitted. In 
both instances, proof of degree is required either 
by an official transcript or a certificate of 
graduation. 

READMISSION 

Any student who withdraws from the University 
must apply for readmission through the Office of 
Admissions regardless of the time interval 
involved since withdrawal. A student who is dis- 
missed for academic reasons must appeal to the 
Committee on Student Standing of the school to 
which application of admission or readmission is 
being made, once the application has been submit- 
ted to the Admissions Office. 

TRANSFERS 

A student who wishes to transfer from another 
college or university must have the complete tran- 
scripts of high school and college records for- 
warded to the Office of Admissions and must sub- 
mit an application for admission. When accepted. 



"For information about testing in any country, the Educa- 
tional Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, 
should be contacted. 



142 



the student must supply to the dean of his school a 
description of the courses which appear on the 
transcript. The student should contact the Advise- 
ment Office of his school for placement and curric- 
ulum planning following a reasonable period for 
evaluation of transcript. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and 
Schools of Education and Pharmacy award 60 
semester hours of credit to accepted transfer appli- 
cants who have an Associate Degree in Arts from a 
regionally accredited two-year institution. 

Students transferring from a regionally accred- 
ited institution must present academic records 
which show an overall average of C (2.0 on a 4.0 
quality point system). 

Persons seeking admission to the University as 
transfer students from a state approved college 
which does not have regional accreditation must 
have attained a cumulative average of 3.0 based 
on a 4.0 quality point system. In addition, such 
prospective students must take the College 
Entrance Examination Board tests and attain the 
appropriate scores. 

An interview is highly recommended for all 
transfer students and will be required of those stu- 
dents which the Admissions Office notifies 
personally. 

TEMPORARY TRANSFERS 

Temporary Transfers are students who are 
enrolled in another college or university but who 
desire to take a course or courses at Duquesne for 
one semester. 

No Temporary Transfer Student will be granted 
admission without formal application and an offi- 
cial transcript or permission from an official at the 
University at which the student is enrolled. A 
Temporary Transfer Student must reapply if he/ 
she should desire to take a course or courses at 
Duquesne University beyond one semester. 

No Temporary Transfer shall be permitted to 
register for more than two semesters without mak- 
ing arrangements to become a permanent transfer. 

SUMMER SESSION 

DUQUESNE STUDENTS 

Any Duquesne University undergraduate student 
who was granted continuance at the close of the 
preceding Spring Semester is authorized to register 
in the Summer Session. Students who were dis- 
missed by their school at the close of the preceding 
Spring Semester for academic reasons may register 
for summer classes by permission of the Commit- 
tee on Student Standing of their school. All stu- 
dents must have their course selections approved 
by their academic advisor. 

Graduates and other former students, including 
any who withdrew from the University, must 
obtain readmittance before they may register for 
summer classes. 

STUDENTS FROM OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

A student of another college or university who 
wishes to enroll for the summer session, and who 



intends thereafter to return to the original institu- 
tion and is eligible to continue there may be 
admitted to the Summer Session. A tear-out 
admissions application and registration form for 
the summer study is provided in the announce- 
ment of summer offerings, which may be obtained 
from the Office of Admissions at mid-March. 
These students are considered to be Temporary' 
Transfer Students. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Students who have followed the College Entrance 
Examination Board college level program in sec- 
ondary schools and have performed satisfactorily 
in the advanced placement examinations are eligi- 
ble for advanced placement. Duquesne University 
grants credit, as well as placement, for achieve- 
ment that merits such consideration. Subjects 
included in the program are: English composition, 
history, history of art, modern foreign languages 
(French, German, Spanish), Latin, mathematics 
AB, mathematics BC, physics B and C, chemistry, 
biology. 

Credit will be given on a minimum advanced 
placement score determined yearly by the College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences. For current informa- 
tion about the minimal score acceptable for each 
subject and the credits granted, consult with the 
University's Director of Testing Bureau or the 
Office of Academic Advisement, College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. 

Applicants who hope to receive advanced place- 
ment credits must request that scores be sent to 
the University. Information about equivalent Uni- 
versity courses for which qualifying students may 
receive credit may be obtained from the Univer- 
sity's Director of Testing Bureau or the Assistant 
Dean for Administration, College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. 

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION 
PROGRAM 

The special examinations for which the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences will award credits, with 
acceptable scores, are: 

1. General Examinations: Humanities, social 
sciences. 

2. Subject Examinations: American goverment, 
American history, analysis and interpretation of 
literature, biology, college algebra, college algebra- 
trigonometry, college composition, computers and 
data processing, elementary computer program- 
ming, FORTRAN IV, general chemistry, general 
psychology, introductory calculus, introductory 
business management, introductory marketing, 
introductory money and banking (only validation 
of comparable course(s) taken at regionally accred- 
ited schools where courses were offered at the 200 
level or above. Students must have completed the 
course(s) with a "c" or better to be eligible.), intro- 
ductory sociology, microbiology, macro-econom- 
ics, micro-economics, statistics, western 
civilization. 



A student who has accumulated 30 or more 
credits is not eligible to take the General Examina- 
tion for credits. When a student has acquired 60 
credits he will not be given credits on the basis of 
CLEP exams. This total of 60 includes the CLEP 
credit; i.e., if a student has completed 57 credits, 
he could not receive more than 3 credits on CLEP 
exams. The University is contunuing to evaluate 
CLEP subject scores and performance at 
Duquesne. Credit will be given on a minimum 
score determined yearly by the College of Liberal 
Arts and Science. 

Exams must be taken according to the usual 
progression of courses. The exam in College Alge- 
bra or College Algebra/Trig must be taken before a 
student registers for Calculus I. 

Information about the time and place that 
examinations are given may be obtained from the 
University Testing Bureau, or the College Level 
Examination Program, Box 977, Princeton, New 
Jersey 08540. Information about equivalent Uni- 
versity courses for which qualifying students may 
receive credit may be obtained from the Univer- 
sity's Director of Testing Bureau or the Assistant 
Dean for Administration, College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. 

CREDIT HOUR BANK 

The Credit Hour Bank is designed for high school 
students and adults who would like to sample col- 
lege courses prior to official enrollment. The maxi- 
mum number of credits that may be taken is 15. 
Credits completed in the Credit Hour Bank are 
held in escrow until the applicant applies and ful- 
fills all regular admission requirements. Upon reg- 
ular admittance, all credits are then evaluated 
toward a degree program. 

To apply to the Credit Hour Bank Program, 
submit the $20 non-refundable application fee, 
and attach a letter indicating full comprehension 
and acceptance of the conditions of the Credit 
Hour Bank Program. A form is available for this 
purpose and can be obtained by contacting the 
office of Admissions. 

Generally, all first year courses in the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences are open to Credit Hour 
Bank students. The school of music also partici- 
pates in the Credit Hour Bank program providing 
the applicant passes a music audition. 



Financial Aid 



Duquesne University subscribes to the philosophy 
that "no student should be denied the education of 
his/her choice for lack of sufficient financial 
resources." The Office of Student Financial Aid 
has been established to help students locate the 
financial support they require. Students and par- 
ents should not be overwhelmed by the variety 
and apparent complexities of modern student 
financial aid. Rather, a patient thorough examina- 
tion of aid opportunities should be undertaken to 



143 



locate the most advantageous forms of assistance 
available to the individual student. 

PRINCIPLES OF AID 
FINANCIAL NEED 

The major criterion of most aid programs is the 
student's need for funds. In general, parents and 
the student are expected to pay the expenses of 
education. However, to the extent they cannot rea- 
sonably be expected to meet this expense, there is 
a demonstrated financial need or eligibility for aid. 
Methods of determining need may vary slightly 
among aid sources, but all have the common 
objective of identifying the difference between 
educational costs and the individual family's abil- 
ity to contribute to these costs. The costs consid- 
ered include tuition, fees, room and board or an 
allowance for maintenance at home, travel or 
commuting expenses, books, and necessary per- 
sonal expenditures. Need analysis presumes the 
family's ability to contribute to these costs will 
approximate that of families of similar size and 
financial strength, with consideration given for 
individual circumstances. It is extremely impor- 
tant that all financial information reported by the 
family be complete, accurate, and updated for any 
major changes. Such information is considered 
and treated confidentially by aid administrators. 

AWARD CONDITIONS 

All financial aid awards are subject to terms and 
conditions set forth in applications and award 
notifications. It is important that the student care- 
fully read all information provided by aid sources 
and promptly notify them of changes pertinent to 
their applications or awards. 

STUDENT SELF-HELP 

As the primary beneficiary of higher education, the 
student is expected to accept at least partial finan- 
cial responsibility for the cost. This principle is 
reflected in both the determination of need and 
the types of aid available. In determining need, 
consideration is given for at least a minimum con- 
tribution to cost from the student's summer earn- 
ings, savings, and resources. Two types of self-help 
programs of aid are available: loans and work. 
Student loans provide rates, terms, and conditions 
superior to those offered by commercial lenders, 
and offer the student the opportunity to help him- 
self/herself by accepting future repayment respon- 
sibility. Student employment programs provide 
the opportunity to help earn a portion of the edu- 
cational costs. 

GIFT ASSISTANCE 

Non-repayable scholarships or grants are available 
in accordance with one or a combination of the 
following criteria: 1) Financial Need; 2) Superior 
Academic Potential or Achievement; and 3) Spe- 
cial Ability, which reflects proficiency in a special- 
ized field or activity, such as music, debate, athlet- 
ics, etc. It should be noted that many sources of 



44 



gift aid expect the student to accept some form of 
self-help assistance. 

MEETING STUDENT NEED 

The Financial Aid Office attempts to provide aid 
equal to need for all student applicants. Normally, 
this requires an "aid package" consisting of funds 
from multiple aid sources and programs. Those 
programs which are under the direct control of the 
Aid Office are not usually sufficient to meet full 
need or provide an aid package of the most benefi- 
cial composition. It is expected that students who 
apply for assistance to the University will also 
apply to federal, state, and other available sources. 

PROGRAM FUNDING 

All programs of financial aid are subject to limita- 
tions of available funds. Therefore, in addition to 
the eligibility requirements of a particular pro- 
gram, assistance depends upon the level of funding 
in the program. First consideration always goes to 
applicants who apply within deadline dates and 
who provide complete and accurate information. 
All programs are subject to change, elimination, or 
replacement. Changes in government programs 
are routine, since these require periodic legislative 
review. 

CURRENT INFORMATION 

Because programs of aid and conditions of eligibil- 
ity do change from time to time, the student 
should attempt to keep abreast of new develop- 
ments. The high school guidance office, the Uni- 
versity Financial Aid Office, and the office of edu- 
cation in the student's home state are excellent 
sources of information. Students should avoid the 
error of disqualifying themselves for specific forms 
of aid because of hearsay or dated information. A 
decision not to apply to particular aid source 
should be made only upon the advice of an aid 
officer. 

UNIVERSITY AID 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

1. Applicants must be currently enrolled in the 
University or be in the process of applying for 
admission. Incoming students should not wait for 
official acceptance to the University before apply- 
ing for financial assistance. 

2. Obtain the formal application for financial 
assistance. (Freshmen and transfer students may 
obtain the form through Admissions Office publi- 
cations or through the Financial Aid Office. Cur- 
rently enrolled students may obtain the form only 
through the Financial Aid Office.) Complete this 
application and submit it to the Financial Aid 
Office. Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania 15282 PRIOR to these deadline dates: For 
the Fall Semester or the academic year, no later 
than May 1; for the Spring Semester, no later than 
December 1. Late applicants will be considered on 
the basis of available funds. Students interested in 
being considered for scholarships should submit 
their financial aid application by February 1. 



3. Obtain from the high school guidance office 
or the Financial Aid Office a Financial Need Doc- 
ument. Complete and submit it according to 
instructions. Statements take four to eight weeks 
to process and therefore should be submitted as 
early as possible. 

4. A reply to this application, if filed by deadline 
dates, should be anticipated as follows: Freshmen 
and new transfers: between mid-February and late 
March (providing student has been accepted for 
admission). Upperclassmen: Replies should be 
anticipated in June or July. 

5. Applications must be filed annually. 
PROGRAMS 

The following programs for which the foregoing 
application procedures apply, are administered 
directly by the Financial Aid Office. 

University Scholars Awards. The University 
awards scholarships annually to exceptional high 
school scholars. These awards are not based on a 
demonstrated need and may be renewed each year 
provided the student maintains a high level of aca- 
demic achievement. The minimum academic 
requirement is a cumulative Quality Point Aver- 
age of 3.0. 

Competitive Scholarships. These awards are given 
to students of outstanding ability and achievement 
who also demonstrate financial need. They are 
renewable yearly based on continued academic 
achievement, and continued demonstrated need. 
Continued academic achievement is normally 
reflected by a cumulative Quality Point Average of 
3.0 or above. Renewal amounts may vary relative 
to the level of need. 

Parish Grant-In-Aid Program. Available to incom- 
ing freshmen from the parishes in the Diocese of,, 
Pittsburgh. Students are recommended by their 
pastor to the University's Admissions Office. 
Awards are based on academic achievement and 
demonstrated need. They are renewable yearly 
based on continued academic achievement and 
continued need. Continued academic achievement 
is normally reflected by a cumulative Quality 
Point Average of 2.75 and above. Renewal 
amounts may vary relative to the level of need. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants. 
Federal grant assistance is available to full or half- 
time undergraduate students with financial need. 
It should be noted that due to limited funding, 
these grants are normally awarded only to full- 
time students. Recipients are selected in accor- 
dance with guidelines published by the Federal 
Government. 

National Direct Student Loans. National Direct 
Loans are available to both full-time and half-time 
students who demonstrate financial need and are 
making acceptable progress toward a degree. It 
should be noted that due to limited funding, these 
loans are normally awarded only to full-time stu- 
dents. Recipients are selected in accordance with 
guidelines published by the Federal Government. 



145 



Loan repayment does not begin until six months 
after the borrower terminates at least half-time 
study, and is scheduled over a 10-year period at an 
interest rate of five percent a year. 

Federal Nursing Loans. These loans are available 
to full-time undergraduate nursing students who 
demonstrate financial need and are making accept- 
able progress toward a degree. Recipients are 
selected in accordance with guidelines published 
by the Federal government. Loan repayment does 
not begin until nine months after the borrower 
terminates at least half-time study in nursing, and 
is scheduled over a 10-year period at an interest 
rate of six percent a year. 

Health Professions Loans. Health Profession Stu- 
dent Loans are available to full-time undergradu- 
ate students in the Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy program who demonstrate financial 
need and are making acceptable progress toward a 
degree. Recipients are selected in accordance with 
guidelines published by the Federal government. 
Loan repayment does not begin until one year 
after the student ceases to pursue a full-time 
course of study in pharmacy, and is scheduled 
over a 10-year period at an interest rate of nine 
percent a year. 

Student Employment. Two programs of employ- 
ment are available to financial aid applicants who 
demonstrate need. The first is the College Work- 
Study Program which is financed principally by 
Federal appropriations and awarded as aid in 
accordance with guidelines published by the Fed- 
eral government. The second program is referred 
to as the General Program which is funded by the 
University. In addition to considerations of finan- 
cial need, placement in a part-time position 
depends upon the student's qualifications for per- 
forming successfully in the job. Student employ- 
ment is limited to maximum of fifteen working 
hours a week when classes are in session. Students 
working under either program may not retain 
outside jobs during academic periods. 

OTHER SOURCES OF AID 

PELL GRANT PROGRAM 

Direct grant assistance through the Federal gov- 
ernment is available to undergraduates based on 
an eligibility determination reviewed and adjusted 
each year by Congress. All undergraduates are 
advised to apply for this form of aid. Students 
receiving aid through the University are required 
to apply for a Pell Grant. Necessary forms may be 
obtained through the Financial Aid Office or the 
High School Guidance Office. 

STATE GRANT ASSISTANCE 

General: Depending upon the student's legal state 
of residence, direct grant assistance from the 
state may be available for study at Duquesne 
University. 



Non-Pennsylvania residents should contact their 
high school guidance counselor or state Depart- 
ment of Education to determine if grants are avail- 
able, and to determine application procedures. 

Pennsylvania residents should obtain the State 
Grant Application from high school guidance 
offices, the University Financial Aid Office, or the 
Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance 
Agency (PHEAA). At current levels, grants ranging 
from $100 to $1500 a year are available to full- 
time undergraduate students, based on considera- 
tions of financial need. Filing deadline is normally 
May 1. 

GUARANTEED STUDENT LOANS 

This program provides long-term, low interest stu- 
dent loans available through the cooperative 
efforts of federal and state governments and par- 
ticipating private lending institutions. These loans 
are available to students enrolled in an institution 
of higher learning on at least a half-time basis. 
They are provided by commercial lending institu- 
tions in every state. To apply, the student should 
inquire at a local lending institution where the 
student or parents have an account. The maxi- 
mum that an undergraduate student may borrow 
for any academic level is $2,500. A four to six 
week processing period should be anticipated. 

Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students/Auxil- 
iary Loans to Assist Students. Loans are available 
to parents of DEPENDENT undergraduate stu- 
dents; INDEPENDENT undergraduates and grad- 
uates may apply themselves. The maximum 
amount that can be borrowed for any academic 
level is $3000. Repayment begins 60 days after 
disbursement of funds. Applications and informa- 
tion are available through banks and other lending 
institutions. 

OTHER POSSIBILITIES 

In addition to mass programs of aid previously 
described, financial assistance may be obtained 
from a wide variety of sources. Since application 
procedures and requirements differ greatly, it is 
not possible to provide specific information. In 
general the student seeking potential sources of aid 
may inquire of: 1) high school guidance counsel- 
ors; 2) parents' employers or labor unions; 3) fra- 
ternal, social, religious or professional organiza- 
tions; 4) major organizations utilizing the skills of 
the field for which the student is preparing; and 
5) specific departments within the University. 

AID FROM DEPARTMENTS 
AND SCHOOLS 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 

Pittsburgh Communications Foundation Loans. 
The Foundation has established a loan fund for 
deserving junior and senior full-time students in 
the Department of Journalism. Students will be 
required to repay the loan within two years after 
graduation at three percent a year. Such loans will 



146 



be granted on the recommendation of the Chair- 
man of the Journalism Department assisted by the 
Journalism faculty. Loan inquires and applica- 
tions should be made to the Chairman of the 
Department of Journalism. 

The Eleanor Pol is Capone Memorial Award. The 
award honors, in perpetuity, the memory of Elea- 
nor P. Capone. The scholarship consists of the 
total annual income from a restricted growth 
endowment fund and is awarded to an undergrad- 
uate student enrolled at the University, who will 
be selected on the basis of merit in the field of 
creative writing, with need a secondary considera- 
tion. Interested students should contact the Chair- 
man. Honors and Awards Committee, English 
Department, prior to January 15. 

Andrew Kozora Memorial Scholarship. This award 
was established to honor, in perpetuity, the mem- 
ory of Andrew Kozora. Full-time third or fourth 
year students enrolled at Duquesne University 
and having declared a major field of study to be 
either Physics or Mathematics, are eligible for 
such scholarship. The primary considerations will 
be financial need with academic achievement sec- 
ondary. Recipients are selected by the University's 
Director of Financial Aid upon nomination by the 
Chairman of the Physics or Mathematics Depart- 
ments after they have previously consulted with 
the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

The Rev. Joseph A. Lauritis, C.S.Sp., Journalism 
Scholarship. This is an annual scholarship in trib- 
ute to the Rev. Joseph A. Lauritis, C.S.Sp., 
founder of the Department of Journalism and the 
University's radio station, WDUQ-FM. It is avail- 
able to a freshman entering Duquesne University 
who is planning to major in journalism. The 
award is administered by the Lauritis Scholarship 
Committee of Journalism faculty and friends. 
Deadline for application is April 1. 

Edward T Leech Scholarship. This annual schol- 
arship was established in 1971 by the Scripps- 
Howard Foundation for journalism junior/senior 
students who demonstrate outstanding academic 
promise, concurrent financial need, and are pre- 
paring for a journalism career in the newspaper or 
broadcasting fields. It is administered by the 
faculty of the Department of Journalism. 

Colecchia Scholarship Award. The award honors, 
in perpetuity, the memory of Albert and 
Ambrosina Colecchia. The Scholarship award is 
available to juniors and seniors in the undergradu- 
ate College of Arts and Sciences majoring in any of 
the following disciplines: Modern Language, Liter- 
ature, the Classics, Philosophy, English, Math, 
Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics, or Biol- 
ogy. All recipients must be full-time students of 
proven scholastic achievement, be of good moral 
character, and demonstrate a potential for leader- 
ship. The scholarship is awarded annually. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND 
ADMINISTRATION 

Alcoa Scholarships. Two awards are made annu- 
ally, one in transportation and one in accounting, 
to undergraduate students in the School of Busi- 
ness and Administration. Recipients are selected 
by the School on the basis of academic achieve- 
ment. 

Ryan Homes Scholarship. This award is made to 
an undergraduate senior student in production. 
Recipient is selected by the School based upon 
academic achievement. 

Traffic Club of Pittsburgh Scholarship. This award 
is made to an undergraduate student in transporta- 
tion. Recipient is selected by the School based 
upon academic achievement. 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

School of Education Competitive Scholarships are 
available to freshmen and transfer students who 
were among the top fifth of their high school class 
or who maintained a 3.0 high school average. 
Transfer students applying for these scholarships 
must have a "B" average from the school they last 
attended. Applicants are required to submit three 
recommendations representing the areas of aca- 
demic performance and personal achievement. An 
interview is also required to discuss individual 
perceptions and ideals, as well as a statement of 
career goals. Freshmen applicants must have an 
SAT score of at least 900, with a minimum of 400 
on any one test. Transfer applicants must be new 
students to Duquesne. To apply, contact the 
School of Education. For renewal requirements 
and procedures contact the Office of Financial 
Aid. 

Lawrence Roche Memorial Scholarship. The 
award will be made to a student who, as a junior 
in the School of Education, has in the judgment of 
the Awards Committee, demonstrated those quali- 
ties of scholarship, character, and professionalism 
which merit special recognition. The awardee 
must have a minimum Quality Point Average of 
3.0 at the time of application. The student must be 
officially registered as a senior in the School of 
Education of the University at the time of receiv- 
ing the award. Applications must be submitted to 
the Dean's office no later than March 1. 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Women's Advisory Board Scholarships. This fund 
provides scholarships in varying amounts each 
year to vocal performers. These scholarships are 
available to entering freshmen and upperclassmen. 

Jazz Scholarship. Available to all full-time under- 
graduate music students involved in the jazz pro- 
gram. Applications available in the Dean's Office. 

George Barrere Memorial Scholarship. The Pitts- 
burgh Flute Club offers a scholarship in flute in 
memory of George Barrere, founder of the first 



147 



flute club in the United States. This $300 scholar- 
ship is awarded to a freshman or a sophomore 
flute major. 

Polish Arts League Scholarship. This award is 
made annually by the Polish Arts League of Pitts- 
burgh to an outstanding performer in the School 
of Music. Preference will be given to a student of 
Polish ancestry. Other students will not be 
excluded from consideration. 

Music School Scholarships. These awards are 
made possible by donations from individuals and 
organizations in appreciation of performances by 
School of Music students. 

University Solo Wind Scholarships. These scholar- 
ships in varying amounts are awarded only to 
potential "First Chair" performers. 

University String Scholarships. These scholarships 
for tuition and applied music fees have been estab- 
lished by the University to promote the study of 
string instruments. 

Pittsburgh Flute Club Award. This award is given 
to an outstanding woodwind student. 

University Piano Scholarships. These scholarships 
are awarded to students showing outstanding tal- 
ent in piano. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Behan Scholarship. The R. J. Behan Annual Nurs- 
ing Scholarship is a $500 scholarship awarded 
annually to a nursing student who is in good aca- 
demic standing. The award is based on need, pro- 
fessional involvement and future aspirations. Stu- 
dents may apply in the School of Nuring in early 
fall. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Women of Galen. The Women's Auxiliary of the 
Galen Pharmaceutical Society of Pittsburgh annu- 
ally provides scholarship funds to be awarded to 
deserving pharmacy students in their last years of 
attendance in the School of Pharmacy. 

Beaver County Pharmaceutical Association Grant 
and Aid Fund. This revolving loan fund provides 
financial assistance to students in the School of 
Pharmacy who are residents of Beaver County, 
Pennsylvania. Applications are to be made to the 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Samuel W. Curtis Loan Fund. This fund is 
intended to provide financial assistance for stu- 
dents in the School of Pharmacy. 

Chilson Loan Fund. A revolving loan fund estab- 
lished in 1946 through the generosity of Francis P. 
Chilson and expanded by the contributions of 
Pharmacy alumni provides financial assistance to 
worthy students in the School of Pharmacy. 

Joel P. Laughlin Scholarship. In honor of Joel P. 
Laughlin, a fraternity brother whose life was ter- 
minated early in his professional program. The 
Graduate Chapter of Phi Delta Chi annually 
awards three $200 scholarships to one fraternity 
brother in each of the three professional years. The 



recipients must have demonstrated academic 
achievement and active participation in the func- 
tion of the Fraternity. 

Peter and Dorothy Manzione Memorial Fund. A 
revolving fund, donated by Rosetta and Geraldine 
Manzione and friends of the family, is available to 
all students in the School of Pharmacy. 

Clinton Eddy Goodwin Memorial Scholarship. 
This scholarship was established to honor the 
memory of Clinton Eddy Goodwin by making 
annual awards to deserving Pharmacy students. 
Candidates must be a declared Pharmacy major, 
attained a minimum quality point average and 
have an interest in and demonstrated support of 
the University's Athletic Program. Apply through 
the Dean of Students Office. 

Mary McPartland Beck Scholarship Award. Schol- 
arship funds are available from earnings on a fund 
started by a bequest to the School of Pharmacy in 
1970. 

NARD Foundation. Established by the National 
Association of Retail Druggists in honor of its 
executive secretary. John W. Dargavel, this foun- 
dation provides a $200 scholarship to a qualified 
student in the School of Pharmacy as well as loans 
to students of pharmacy in their last five semesters 
for payment of tuition, fees, and books. 

Galen Pharmaceutical Society Loan Fund. This 
revolving fund was established in 1963 for the pur- 
pose of providing financial assistance to worthy 
students of pharmacy during times of urgent finan- 
cial distress. 

Fred Schiller Loan Fund. This loan fund was 
founded by Mr. Fred Schiller, Pittsburgh pharma- 
cist, in memory of the late Emanuel Spector, for 
worthy and qualified students in the School of 
Pharmacy. This revolving fund makes available 
tuition loans of varying amounts depending on the 
applicant's need and general ability. 

John Clothier Sims Memorial Fund. This revolv- 
ing fund, established in 1954, was made possible 
through the generosity of the friends of the late 
Mr. Sims, executive of Sun Drug (now Eckerd) 
Company, Pittsburgh. Partial tuition loans are 
made available to students under the conditions 
that apply to the Fred Schiller Loan Fund. 

Pittsburgh Graduate Chapter of Kappa Psi Phar- 
maceutical Fraternity. Maintains a revolving loan 
fund for members of the undergraduate chapters. 
Details are available from the School of 
Pharmacy. 

Rite-Aid Scholarship. A $1,000 scholarship from 
the Rite-Aid Corporation is available to students 
entering the final year of the pharmacy program. 
Letters of application should be addressed to the 
Dean, School of Pharmacy, by May 1. Selection is 
based on financial need, demonstration of normal 
progress, and good standing in the pharmacy 
program. 



:48 



Tan Alumni Chapter of Lambda Kappa Sigma. 
This professional Pharmacy fraternity for women 
has established financial awards for members in 
their last three years of the pharmacy program. 
Awards are based on financial need and participa- 
tion in the organization. 

Dr. B. Olive Cole Graduate Educational Grant. A 
$300 grant is offered by Lambda Kappa Sigma to 
financially assist an alumnae member who is 
enrolled in a program of graduate study and 
research in the pharmaceutical sciences. Applica- 
tions must by received by the chairman of the 
grant committee by November 15. Applications 
are available in the School of Pharmacy Office. 

GENERAL 

The Pittsburgh/Centennial Scholarship was cre- 
ated at the close of Duquesne University's Centen- 
nial year (1978) in the spirit of the University's 
founding mission to provide ready access to higher 
education for all. The scholarship will be provided 
to deserving students who have demonstrated high 
academic performance and need. Emphasis will be 
on performance in selection of recipient. Inquiries 
should be directed to the Office of Financial Aid. . 

DUSSO Scholarship Fund. Annually the 
Duquesne University Student Scholarship Organi- 
zation sponsors scholarships to help make it possi- 
ble for deserving students to attend Duquesne. 
Applicants must be enrolled on a full-time basis, 
show proven academic ability, be of good moral 
character, and demonstrate financial need. Appli- 
cation materials may be obtained through the 
SGA office and must be filed by April 1. 

McCloskey Memorial Fund is awarded to stu- 
dents who have demonstrated scholastic ability, 
good character, and volunteer service to the com- 
munity. Applications are to be made directly to 
the Office of the Dean of Students. 

Vira I. Heinz Travel Award. This fund was estab- 
lished to provide an educational and cultural 
opportunity for promising young women students. 
Recipients are selected on the basis of academic 
achievement and evidence of interest in intercul- 
tural or international relations. Inquiries should 
be directed to the Office of the Dean of Students. 

Nathan and Harry Daly Scholarship. This is an 
annual award that is to be made to "such deserv- 
ing person or persons from Butler County, Penn- 
sylvania attending Duquesne University."' Selec- 
tion is made by a committee upon the 
recommendation of the University's Financial Aid 
Office. Candidates are considered for academic 
achievement and financial need. Interested stu- 
dents should apply through the Financial Aid 
Office. 

Elizabeth Elsie McDonough Scholarship. This 
award was established to assist needy students 
from Allegheny County to continue their educa- 
tional endeavors at Duquesne University. Recipi- 
ents are selected by the University and awards are 



based on both academic achievement and finan- 
cial need. 

Minnie Hyman Scholarship. A gift from the 
Hyman Family Foundation. Awards are based on 
academic criteria and need. The amount of the 
awards varies. Recipients are selected by the 
Financial Aid Office and the Hyman Family Foun- 
dation. Interested students should apply through 
the Financial Aid Office. 

James H. and Margaret Lavelle Ferry Memorial 
Scholarship. This award was established to honor, 
in perpetuity, the memory of James H. and Mar- 
garet Lavelle Ferry by awarding annually a prize to 
a deserving student in their name. Recipients are 
selected by the University, with the primary con- 
sideration being financial need and academic 
achievement as a secondary consideration. Recipi- 
ents must be enrolled as undergraduate students. 
Interested students should apply through the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Melville Alexander Eberhardt Memorial Fund. 
This fund was established to provide scholarships 
for the benefit of students residing in the United 
States. Worthy students are recommended by the 
University to the Trustees of the fund, with both 
academic and financial considerations being used. 
Interested students should apply through the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Louis and Ida Amdursky and Benjamin Amdursky 
Memorial Fund. This fund was established to 
assist Jewish students who are residents of Alle- 
gheny County. Recommendations are made by the 
University to the Trustees of the fund, and are on 
the basis of merit and need. Interested students 
should apply through the Financial Aid Office. 

J. W. Rahde Memorial Scholarship Fund. A 
newly-established fund in honor of J. W. and Ruth 
Lewis Rahde in recognition of their long-time 
affection for the City of Pittsburgh. Factors to be 
considered for selection include leadership quali- 
ties, good character, strong potential for civic con- 
tributions (especially to the City of Pittsburgh) and 
the ability to relate well with others. Interested 
students should reply through the Financial Aid 
Office. 

Stella and Charles Guttman Scholarship Founda- 
tion. Awards are based on need with academic 
considerations secondary. Interested students 
should apply through the Financial Aid Office. 

John Joseph Mongillo Memorial Scholarship 
Fund. Awards are based on financial need. The 
fund was established through a gift to the Univer- 
sity from Marie Locher in memory of her brother, 
John Mongillo. Interested students should apply 
through the Financial Aid Office. 

UNIVERSITY DISCOUNT 

Clergy/Religious Discount. Members of Univer- 
sity-recognized Christian and Jewish Religions, 
who have been ordained or professed, may be eli- 
gible to receive a discount of one-half tuition for 
undergraduate or graduate studies. 



Restrictions 

1. University fees, laboratory costs, room and 
board, and other non-tuition related expenses will 
be charged at full rate. Discount is one-half tuition 
only. 

2. Only one Duquesne degree may be obtained 
utilizing the discount and no other form of dis- 
count or remission may be received simultane- 
ously. 

3. Discount is not extended for studies in the 
Institute of Formative Spirituality, Law School, 
Master of Liberal Studies, doctoral degree pro- 
grams, or any designated special programs with 
differential rates. 

Catholic School Lay Teacher Discount. Full-time 
teachers in catholic schools, who have completed a 
minimum of two years teaching at an approved 
diocesan school, may be eligible to receive a dis- 
count of one-half tuition for undergraduate or 
graduate studies. The same restrictions indicated 
under the section on clergy/religious discounts 
apply. 

Senior Citizen Discount. Men and women who are 
60 years of age or older may be eligible to receive a 



149 



discount of one-half tuition for undergraduate or 
graduate studies. The same restrictions indicated 
under the section on clergy/religious discounts 
apply. 

RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS 
(ROTC) SCHOLARSHIPS 

Army ROTC offers a number of four-year scholar- 
ships for qualified students on a very competitive 
basis. These scholarships pay for tuition, fees, 
required textbooks, and other purely academic 
expenses as well as providing a $100 per month 
subsistence allowance. Interested high school stu- 
dents may apply by writing: Army ROTC, 
Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
15282. The application period begins in April of 
the student's junior year and ends in December of 
their senior year. 

For students already enrolled at Duquesne Uni- 
versity, three-year and two-year scholarships are 
available. Individuals need not be participating in 
the ROTC program to apply. For additional infor- 
mation, contact the Military Science Department 
at 434-6664. 



Tuition and Fees 



The University reserves the right to change tuition and fee charges if exigencies require such action. The 
figures shown apply to the 1985-86 term only, unless otherwise indicated. 

TUITION 

Undergraduate Tuition for each semester hour credit $184 

Graduate Tuition for each semester hour credit $194 

Auditors pay the same as students taking courses for credits. 

FEES 

Application (non-refundable) $ 20 

Matriculation Deposit (non-refundable) 100 

Residence Hall Pre-Payment (non-refundable) 150 

Change of Schedule for processing each form 5 

Credit by Examination for each semester hour for recognition of proficiency 

of course credit (See policy in Section VI, page 144) 20 

Orientation (New Students) 25 

Late Registration 25 

Removal of I Grade 5 

Registration Correction Fee 15 

Continuing Registration Fee 50 

*Undergraduate Business and Administration Student 

when carrying 12 or more credits 5 

Less than 12 credits 3 

*Undergraduate Music Student when carrying 

12 or more credits 50 

*School of Pharmacy Undergraduate Fee 150 

*Undergraduate Pharmacy Student Activities (for Third, 

Fourth, and Fifth Year Students) 25 

^University Fee $ 1 1 per credit 

*Charged on each semester registration. 

LABORATORY FEES 

All amounts are for one semester; where applicable, the yearly charge is double. In addition to the laboratory 
fee, some programs also require a breakage charge of $15.00 a semester; this is proportionately refundable, 
depending upon the losses incurred. 



150 

Laboratory fees apply to the 1985-1986 academic year. 

Biology (each laboratory) $ 35 

Business 491 (Simulation) 5 

Chemistry (each laboratory) 40 

Computer Science 10 

Education 490, 491 (Student Teaching) 25 

English 203, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385 5 

English 439, 379 10 

Journalism 367, 369, 380, 405, 409, 485 10 

Journalism 267, 268, 370, 378, 379, 381, 413 15 

Journalism 375 25 

Mathematics 307, 308 10 

Music-Applied Music 101, 102, 103, 104, 201, 202, 203, 204, 301, 302, 303, 

304, 401, 402, 403, 404 220 

Music-Applied Music 111, 112, 118, 119, 211, 212, 218, 219, 311, 312,411, 412 110 

Music-Class Piano 213, 214, 215, 315 35 

Music-Class Methods 181, 182, 183, 184 35 

Music-Brass Class Methods, 281, 282, 283, 284 35 

Music-Organ Practice Room 35 

Music-Ensemble 143, 144, 146, 148, 150, 210, 243, 244, 245, 247, 248, 347, 447 35 

Music-Sacred Music Choir 210 75 

Music-Seminar 105 35 

Music-String Class Methods 381, 382 35 

Music-Therapy Practicum 124, 223, 224, 323, 324, 423, 424 35 

Personal Computer Writing 15 

Pharmacy 011, 012, 016, 017, 022, 027, 031, 032, 035, 054 40 

Physics (each laboratory) 35 

Psychology 356 7 

Speech 101, 204, 206, 208, 220, 251, 263, 264, 302, 311, 351 5 

Graduate Biology With Laboratory 35 

Graduate Chemistry 520, 561 40 

Graduate Classics 551 170 

Graduate Communications 512 25 

Graduate Modern Languages 051 & 052 170 

Graduate Psychology 571 15 

Graduate Pharmacy (each laboratory) 30 

Graduate Education 512, 692, 693 10 

Graduate Music 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606 220 

Graduate Music Minors 511, 512, 513, 514, 515 110 

Graduate-Organ Practice Room 35 

"""Laboratory Breakage Fee 15 

One breakage card per semester will cover laboratory breakage in Chemistry. 

SUMMER AND SPECIAL SESSION TUITION AND FEE CHARGES 

Undergraduate Tuition for each semester hour credit $184 

Graduate Tuition for each semester hour credit $194 

University Fee $ 1 1 per credit 

GRADUATION FEES 

Bachelor Degree , $ 30 

Master Degree 40 

Doctor of Pharmacy Degree 40 

Juris Doctor Degree 85 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 55 

Thesis Binding Fee — Doctoral Dissertation 80 

Thesis Binding Fee — Master Thesis 70 

WITHDRAWAL AND TERMINATION 

OF ATTENDANCE charged for the semester or session in accordance 

Upon officially withdrawing from the University, with the Tuition Remission Schedule. The 

a student receives remission of part of the tuition amount of the remission is added to payments, 

and a refund is made upon request where a credit 
balance is created on the student's total account. 



15 



The Effective Date of Withdrawal for determin- 
ing the percent of remission is that on which the 
appropriate Academic Dean was notified by letter 
of the student's decision to terminate attendance 
and requested official withdrawal. It is also the 
recorded date of the student's separation from the 
University and regarded as the last day of attend- 
ance. A student is considered enrolled and "in 
attendance" until he or she acts to terminate 
attendance in conformity with this policy even 
though absences from classes were observed and 
recorded before the Effective Date of Withdrawal. 

When a student's attendance is involuntarily 
terminated in a semester because of personal disa- 
bility arising from injury or illness, any remission 
of tuition beyond the limits prescribed by the 
withdrawal refund policy is subject first to the 
approval of the Academic Dean, then the Vice 
President for Academic Affairs, and finally, the 
Vice President for Business and Management. 

TUITION REMISSION SCHEDULE 

This schedule applies to tuition only; it does not 
apply to other charges, such as the University Fee, 
course fee, and laboratory fees, nor to the reduc- 
tion of credits resulting from course withdrawals 
made after the Change of Schedule period. 

Within the Semester Percent of Remission 

First Week 80 

Second Week 80 

Third Week 40 

Fourth Week 20 

After Fourth Week None 

Within the Summer Session — Based on a 
Six Week Session Standard 

First Week 60 

Second Week 20 

After Second Week None 

ROOM AND BOARD 

The request for on-campus residence is made on 
the same form used for application for admission 
to the University. After the student has completed 
the admission procedure and has paid the matric- 
ulation deposit, the residency request is referred 
automatically to the Assistant Director of Resi- 
dence Life. The request is processed and necessary 
application forms are forwarded to the student. 

The University requires that a prepayment of 
$150, which is applicable to the following semes- 
ter's room and board account, accompany all 
applications for room reservations or renewals. 
This pre-payment is non-refundable. 

Reservations are made on a semester basis — 
August to December, January to May. Rooms may 
be occupied no earlier than noon of the day pre- 
ceding the beginning of the orientation or registra- 
tion periods. 

Room assignments are made on a first-come, 
first-serve basis. Therefore, it is extremely impor- 
tant for the student to return his/her housing 
application immediately upon receipt of it. Over- 
crowded conditions have occurred in the past and 



students have been temporarily assigned three io a 
room or in lounges. Therefore, students returning 
their application after all rooms have been 
assigned will be housed in temporary housing, be 
placed on a waiting list, or not be assigned a space 
in the residence area. 

All students occupying rooms in the University 
residence halls are required to take their meals at 
the Resident Dining Hall. Charges are for 20 meals 
a week, with meals served commencing with the 
evening meal of the day before the first day of 
classes. A commuter meal plan and a 14-meal plan 
for sophomores, juniors and seniors are also 
available. 

Residence Halls are closed during vacation 
(Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter) periods. 

All resident students must present evidence of 
health and accident insurance coverage; such cov- 
erage is available through the University. 

The University reserves the right to modify 
these charges if exigencies require such action. 

Regular Session — Room and Board (20 meals a 
week; includes cleaning, public damage, health 
services fees) 

Single for each semester $1,701.50 

Double for each semester $1,421.00 

Summer Sessions — Room and Board* 

6 Weeks .... $609.00 (Single Room and Board) 

$504.84 (Double Room and Board) 
8 Weeks .... $812.00 (Single Room and Board) 

$673.12 (Double Room and Board) 

ROOM AND BOARD— WITHDRAWAL 
AND REFUND 

A resident student must notify the Assistant 
Director of Residence Life in advance of the 
planned withdrawal. No refund of room charges 
will be made where withdrawal occurs after the 
opening classes. In the event of withdrawal, board 
will be refunded at the rate of 75 per cent of the 
balance remaining on the student's meal plan, up 
until mid-semester. After the mid-semester point, 
no refund will be made. No reduction of charges 
nor refund of payments to which a student may 
have been otherwise entitled will be made if with- 
drawal is not in accordance with the official with- 
drawal procedure. 

No student is permitted to remain in the resi- 
dence halls after academic withdrawal from the 
University has been completed. 



*Those desiring residency for the Summer Session should 
make reservations with the Assistant Director of Resi- 
dence Life three weeks prior to opening date of your ses- 
sion. A non-refundable deposit of $20 must accompany 
each application. After occupancy, the deposit is applied 
toward the room and board expenses. This deposit is not 
refunded if the rooom is not occupied. Rates shown are 
for 1985 summer session only. For day rates and three, 
four and five week rates, contact the Office of Residence 
Life. 



152 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 

All charges for tuition, fees, room and board, less 
financial assistance authorized by the Financial 
Aid Office, are payable at registration. For your 
convenience, Master Charge and VISA (Bank 
Americard) can be utilized to pay tuition and 
fees. 

BILLING PROBLEMS 

Take the billing statement to the office indicated 
for an explanation or correction concerning these 
billing matters. 

a) Balance Forward, Credits, Payments 
Deposits — Accounts Receivable Office. 

b) Financial Aid Awards, Federal Loans, 
Guaranty Loans, and Employer Billing — 
Office of the Director of Financial Aid. 

c) Student Finance Program, (Deferred Pay- 
ment Plan) — Accounts Receivable Office. 

d) Housing Reservations and Housing 
Charges — Office of the Assistant Dean of 
Residence Life. 

STUDENT FINANCING PROGRAM: 

(All prior balances must be paid in full before the 
student is eligible for this plan.) Duquesne Univer- 
sity students desiring payment of their tuition and 
other charges for the semester by installment, con- 
tact in person the Student Finance Section at Final 



Registration. The Student Financing Program pro- 
vides financing for up to 50% of the current semes- 
ter charges less financial aid authorized and other 
payments, to be repaid to the University in two 
equal installments. Interest is charged at the rate 
of % of 1% per month. A delinquency charge on 
each monthly installment in default for a period of 
ten days or more will be charged in an amount 
equal to 5% of such installment or $5.00, which- 
ever is less, except that a minimum charge of 
$1.00 may be made. 

CASHING CHECKS 

A student may cash a check up to a maximum of 
$50 at the Cashier's Office on the Ground Floor of 
the Administration Building between 9:00 A.M. 
and 4:00 P.M., Monday through Friday, except 
during registration, with a validated ID Card for 
the current semester. 

BAD CHECKS 

It is the policy of the University to charge bad 
checks to the student who cashes them regardless 
of the maker. A $3.00 service charge will be 
assessed on checks that are returned from a bank 
for lack of funds. 




153 



Part VI: 

Registration and 
Scholastic Policies 



REGISTRATION 

Students who attend the Fall Semester, which 
begins in late August, receive academic advise- 
ment and register for classes during the preceding 
months of April, May, June, and July. Spring 
Semester students register in the Fall Semester 
during November and early December. 

Orientation programs for new students are con- 
ducted by the schools in late spring and summer in 
conjunction with academic advisement and 
registration. 

A comprehensive invoice that confirms the class 
schedule of courses for which the student is regis- 
tered and lists fees, tuition, dormitory charge, 
deposits, financial aid awards, and balance due is 
mailed to the student at his or her permanent 
address a month before classes begin, thus 
enabling the student or parent to make payment 
by mail. 

A three-day final registration for students who 
have neither obtained registration for classes nor 
concluded financial arrangements is held just 
before the opening of classes. 

The financial obligation for class places reserved 
by a registered student who does not subsequently 
attend cannot be canceled unless written notifica- 
tion of the decision not to attend is given to the 
Registrar before the first class day. Notification 
received on or after the opening day of classes is 
subject to the official withdrawal policy. With- 
drawal from room and board reservation contracts 
is to be made in accordance with the provisions of 
the contract. See Room and Board — Withdrawal 
Refund, page 141 of this catalog. 

OFFICIAL REGISTRATION 

Only students who are recognized as officially reg- 
istered are bona fide students of Duquesne Univer- 
sity. Unless students are officially registered, they 
are not permitted to attend classes, engage in stu- 
dent affairs, or, generally, have access to the build- 
ings and grounds or use of the University's 
facilities. 

Official registration is the recognition given by 
the University to persons who have met these 
conditions: 

1. Appropriate authority for admittance to study 
in a school or department has been given by an 
authorized officer of the University. The admitting 
authority for undergraduate students resides in the 
Director of Admissions. 



2. Authorization to continue in the program 
selected has been given and registration for classes 
has been accomplished in compliance with all aca- 
demic requirements and procedures. 

3. Arrangements have been made to the satisfac- 
tion of the University for payment in full of all 
financial charges, including fees, tuition, and hous- 
ing charges, all of which are due and payable in 
full before the beginning of classes. 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE 

Students requiring a change of class schedule, to 
change class times or to add or to drop a class, are 
permitted to do so during the pre-registration 
period, the final registration period, and the first 
class week of the semester. Change of class sched- 
ule is not permitted after the Latest Date for 
Change of Schedule as announced in the semester 
academic calendar. 

All schedule changes must be approved by the 
academic adviser and processed with the Regis- 
trar. Schedule change requests processed with the 
Registrar during the first class week must also 
have the signatures of the instructors whose 
classes are being added or dropped. 

Students who tardily process change forms are 
not entitled to refund for the course credits 
dropped. Courses dropped after the deadline for 
making schedule changes are classified as course 
withdrawals. (See 'Withdrawal from a Course', 
and 'Withdrawal from the University' mentioned 
elsewhere in this catalog.) 

Except for changes requested by the dean or 
advisor, a fee of $5.00 is charged for each change 
form processed after the close of pre-registration. 

CROSS-REGISTRATION 

Cross-college and -university registration provides 
opportunities for enriched educational programs, 
approved by a student's advisor or dean, at any of 
the following institutions: 

Carlow College La Roche College 

Carnegie-Mellon Pittsburgh Theological 

University Seminary 

Chatham College Point Park College 

Community College Robert Morris College 

of Allegheny University of Pittsburgh 

County 

The opportunity for cross-registration will be 
available to each full-time student enrolled in any 



54 



program leading to a degree. Full credit and grade 
will be transferred. 

Each college or university accepts registration in 
regularly accredited courses designated by it as 
open to cross-registration. First priority in registra- 
tion shall go to the students of the host college. 

The student's advisor or dean is responsible for 
assuring eligibility for the course in which the stu- 
dent intends to enroll. Each qualified student may 
enroll in no more than one course off campus in 
any one term or semester under this program. 
Cross-registration is conducted through the office 
of the home registrar. 

Duquesne University students who are partici- 
pating in this program are charged tuition and 
University Fee in accordance with the current 
rates charged by Duquesne University; however, 
students are responsible for paying any course or 
laboratory fees to the host institution. 

These policies on cross-registration are not effec- 
tive at this time for enrollments in summer ses- 
sions, including the spring term at the University 
of Pittsburgh. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

With approval of the appropriate dean and upon, 
payment of the penalty fee, late registration may 
be permitted for a serious reason; however, no 
student may be registered and begin attending 
classes later than the Latest Date for Registration 
and Change of Schedule as announced in the Aca- 
demic Calendar. 

RECORDS AND REPORTS 

SEMESTER GRADE REPORTS 

Every registered student who is free of financial 
obligations to the University is sent a report of 
grades to the permanent address on record soon 
after the close of each semester. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Each student receives a summary transcript of his 
or her complete academic record at the close of 
each academic year. Students should carefully 
examine their records for accuracy and immedi- 
ately report errors to the Registrar. 

To obtain additional copies of their academic 
records students must write to the Registrar for 
transcripts for themselves or for the other institu- 
tions and agencies. All official transcripts issued by 
the Office of the Registrar bear the signature of the 
Registrar and the embossed seal of the Office of 
the Registrar. Whenever an official transcript is 
released directly to the student it will also bear the 
stamped designation. Issued to Student. 

No transcript will be issued unless all financial 
obligations owed by the student to the University 
have been fulfilled. A fee of $2.00 is charged for 
the issuance of each transcript. 

CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT 
RECORDS 

The University regards the student's personal 
information and academic record as a matter of 



confidence between the student and the Univer- 
sity. The contents of either may be revealed only 
in accordance with the Family Educational Rights 
and Privacy Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-380, Sec- 
tion 438, as amended). 

In order that parents of students may receive 
from University officials information concerning 
the college attendance academic record of their 
child, it is required by the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) (Public 
Law 93-380, as amended, section 99, 31 (8) that 
either the parents must prove financial depen- 
dence of their child upon them according to the 
dependency test as defined in section 1 52 of the 
Internal Revenue Code of 1954, or the child must 
grant a waiver of rights given by FERPA. 

Students wishing to waive the requirement of 
FERPA relating to the release of academic infor- 
mation to parents must complete the waiver 
obtainable at the office of the academic adviser. 

Academic Policies 



POLICIES 

ACADEMIC ADVISOR 

Every student attending the University is assigned 
or selects an academic advisor. It is the student's 
responsibility to ascertain the advisor's name 
which may be obtained from the office of the 
school in which the student is enrolled. 

The student should consult with the academic 
advisor about the program and any questions of 
an academic nature. No student may register 
without the academic advisor's approval and 
signature. 

ACADEMIC SUPERVISOR OF 
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

The academic progress of student athletes engaged 
in intercollegiate competition is monitored by the 
ASIA. The delivery of academic support systems 
to those student athletes who need them is facili- 
tated via this office. 

AUDITING COURSES 

Regularly enrolled Duquesne students are permit- 
ted to audit courses. In addition, non-degree stu- 
dents from the general community who would like 
to audit courses for personal enrichment and who 
are not matriculated nor pursuing a degree pro- 
gram are also eligible to audit. Regular students 
should consult their academic advisor for details 
on auditing. Non-degree students should contact 
Duquesne's Division of Continuing Education to 
complete a brief application form. Admission is 
granted on a space available basis by consulting 
the Office of the Registrar and the individual 
schools. Fees for auditing are uniform for all 
students. 

Registration in a course as an auditor must be 
declared at registration and is irrevocable after the 
last date for change of schedule each semester, as 



55 



indicated in the University Calendar (see pages 2- 
7). Records will show "Audit" in the grade space 
on the transcript of a regularly matriculated stu- 
dent. A "Certificate of Attendance" for non-degree 
students will be awarded by the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education. Audited courses are not eligible 
to be converted to matriculated credits. Courses 
audited may not be challenged later or completed 
via CLEP or other advanced standing tests. 

Courses eligible for auditing are determined by 
the individual colleges and schools of the Univer- 
sity. A partial list of school policies follows, but 
students are advised to consult with the Offices of 
the Deans for the most current listings: 1) No 
courses in the School of Law are available for 
audits; 2) No clinical courses in the School of 
Nursing and Pharmacy can be audited; 3) In the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, courses in the 
humanities and social sciences can be audited, but 
communications and science laboratory courses 
may not be audited. 

Students enrolling for audit may attend lectures, 
complete course readings and, at the discretion of 
the professor in charge of the course, may partici- 
pate in classroom discussion and examinations. 

CANCELLATION OF COURSES 

The University makes every reasonable effort to 
offer courses as announced in the Semester Sched- 
ule of Courses and the Summer Session Bulletin. 
It reserves the right, however, to make changes or 
cancel courses in the academic schedule because of 
insufficient enrollment or for any other equally 
valid reason. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Regular class attendance is normally essential for 
maximum educational advantage and is strongly 
encouraged. The responsibility for all course mate- 
rial rests wholly with the student. Schools may 
require attendance at every class. 

It is the prerogative of each school to establish 
policy for attendance at classes, laboratories, tests, 
examinations, deadlines for reports, and specific 
school requirements. It is the instructor's responsi- 
bility to make the school's policy known at the 
first class session as it pertains to the course and 
school. 

The student who is unable to attend class 
because of serious illness, hospitalization, a seri- 
ous accident or other extenuating circumstance is 
responsible for notifying the office of his academic 
dean. He should supply the necessary written ver- 
ification as soon as possible. 

The student must submit the work assigned and 
take the examination in the course at the specified 
time. If the work is not submitted or an examina- 
tion is not taken at the scheduled time, the policy 
is to assign a zero for that part of the course. An 
accumulation of zero grades could result in a final 
grade of 'F.' If a student has for significant reasons 
missed a part of the course or an examination, the 
grade may be submitted as an 'I.' If the temporary 



T grade is to be replaced by a passing grade, the 
work must be completed by the time stated in the 
Academic Calendar. Failure on the part of the stu- 
dent to remove the temporary grade results in con- 
version of that grade to an k F' recorded on the 
transcript. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Freshman: less than 30 credits completed. 
Sophomore: 30 to 59 credits completed. 
Junior: 60 to 89 credits completed. 
Senior: 90 or more credits completed. 

1. Full-time Student. A student with an aca- 
demic schedule of at least 12 credits is considered 
a full-time student. With this status a student is 
entitled to the benefits of various activities. A stu- 
dent may not change status during the semester 
without the permission of the academic advisor 
and the Dean of the student's school. 

2. Part-time Student. Anyone who carries under 
12 credits is regarded as a part-time student. 

3. Post-graduate Student. A person who has 
completed a baccalaureate degree and is seeking 
additional undergraduate credits. 

COURSE EXAMINATIONS 

Unit examinations are given on the dates 
announced by the instructor at the beginning of 
each semester. Grades for these are obtained from 
the instructor. 

Final examinations are given at the end of each 
semester and summer session. No student is 
excused from taking the final examination. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Examinations for recognition of proficiency in a 
subject, or for course credit, as authorized by the 
College or a particular School of the University, 
are available to currently enrolled students who by 
previous experience or exposure have acquired 
mastery of the knowledge in certain courses. An 
application fee of $20.00 is charged for each course 
credit; application forms may be obtained from 
the Office of the Registrar. 

As policies vary among the Schools, students 
who feel they may qualify for credit by examina- 
tion should consult the Dean of the school in 
which they are enrolled for specific information 
about courses open to this examination procedure. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The officially recognized method of grading course 
work and rating academic performance of under- 
graduate students at the University is as follows: 
A — Excellent 
B — Good 
C — Average 

D — Below average; passing 
P — Pass (Used in some courses where scaled 
grading is inappropriate. Indicates satisfac- 
tory completion of course work with credits 
earned but without quality points and is 
independent of the quality point system) 



56 



S — Satisfactory (Used in pass/fail elected 
courses and is independent of the quality 
point system) 

F — Failure (Course must be repeated for credit) 

U — Unsatisfactory — Failure (Used in pass/fail 
elected courses and is independent of the 
quality point system; course must be 
repeated for credit) 

I — Incomplete (A temporary grade given by an 
instructor when neither a passing nor fail- 
ing grade can be determined because of 
incomplete course work. Unless a cogent 
explanation of extenuating circumstances, 
acceptable to the instructor, is presented 
and the missed examination or required 
assignment is made up by the date speci- 
fied in the Academic Calendar, the I 
becomes a permanent F grade) 

W — Official Withdrawal (Used on a student's 
permanent record to indicate termination 
of attendance in courses under conditions 
of official withdrawal. See pages 158 and 
151, Withdrawal from a Course and With- 
drawal from the University) 

QUALITY POINT SYSTEM 

The student's overall academic quality point aver- 
age (QPA) is obtained by dividing the total quality 
points earned by the total number of semester 
hours attempted. These quality point values of 
grades are used for each credit attempted: 

A — four points 
B — three points 
C — two points 
D — one point 
F — zero points 

Courses in which grades P, S, U, I, and W were 
given are not used in calculating the quality point 
average. 

REPEATING COURSES AND COURSE 
RETROGRADATION 

Students ordinarily are permitted to repeat courses 
in which D and F grades were received. The 
request for permission to repeat a course is to be 
submitted in letter form to the academic adviser, 
before registering in the repeat course. All grades 
are retained on the permanent academic record. 
The result of the final attempt in a repeated course 
is, however, the student's status in the course with 
regard to attempted credits, earned credits, and the 
completion of requirements. 

Retrogradation, a corollary of the repeat credit 
rule under which a student may earn credit once 
only for a course, prescribes that a student may 
not move backward from an advanced course to a 
lower level course and receive credit for both. Any 
doubtful situation must be decided by the depart- 
ment chairperson or dean involved. 

PASS/FAIL ELECTIVES 

One course a semester, elected by a junior or 
senior and approved by the academic advisor as 
providing an opportunity to expand and enrich 



the student's experience, may be taken on a pass/ 
fail (S-U) basis. If passed, the credits will count for 
graduation, but neither grade nor credits will be 
calculated in the quality point average. 

Once a course has been identified as a pass/fail 
elective, the course must be completed as such, 
and the grade submitted must be an S or a U. No 
required course may be taken on this elective 
pass/fail basis. 

The decision to elect the pass/fail option must 
be made during registration or no later than the 
close of the period provided for making schedule 
changes. 

STUDENT STANDING 

Progress toward a degree is measured by the 
cumulative quality point average. The scholastic 
records of students who fail to meet the minimum 
requirements as established by the faculty of each 
college or school will be submitted to the College 
or School Committee on Student Standing for 
review and appropriate action. Normally, aca- 
demic records will be reviewed annually at the 
conclusion of each academic year. 

The policy of the Council of Academic Deans 
on Student Athletes vis-a-vis academic standards 
reads as follows: 

a) "To participate in the formal athletic pro- 
grams at the University, a student must be cur- 
rently enrolled as a full-time student. Full-time 
status is defined by University catalog as enroll- 
ment of 12 credits minimum per semester. Such a 
program would allow a student to graduate within 
five years. 

b) A student athlete must be making satisfactory 
academic progress. This means that a student 
must have successfully completed 24 credits dur- 
ing the previous academic year. This would allow 
a student the fall, spring, and summer semesters in 
which to earn these 24 credits. In addition the 
student athlete must satisfy the student standing 
policy as outlined in the Student Handbook and 
University catalogs. 

c) A student athlete (as all students in the Uni- 
versity) is academically dismissed if the student 
athlete fails three courses in one semester. Student 
athletes can be readmitted by the student standing 
committee of the college or school to which the 
student athlete is returning. If a student transfers 
to another school within the University, the stu- 
dent athlete can be admitted only by the Dean of 
that school." 

For students who have attempted 15-30 credits, 

or more than 30 credits in one year, the guidelines 

are: 

Academic Warning: 1.75 to 1.99 QPA (Letter of 
warning may be sent by appropriate Dean) 

Probation: 1.50 to 1.74 QPA (Subject to the juris- 
diction of the appropriate Committee on Stu- 
dent Standing and may be required to modify or 
restrict academic program) 



Dismissal: Less than 1.50 QPA (Readmission may 
be permitted on recommendation of the appro- 
priate Committee on Student Standing) 

For the students who have attempted 31-60 
credits or who have attempted up to 61 credits 
within four semesters, these guidelines prevail: 

Academic Warnings: 1.85 to 1.99 QPA (Letter of 
warning may be sent by appopriate Dean) 

Probation: 1.75 to 1.84 QPA (Subject to the juris- 
diction of the appropriate Committee on Stu- 
dent Standing and may be required to modify or 
restrict academic program) 

Dismissal: Less than 1.75 QPA (Readmission may 
be permitted on recommendation of the appro- 
priate Committee on Student Standing) 

Students who have attempted 61 or more credits 
and who have a QPA of between 1.85 and 1.99 
may continue on probation for one semester. 
However, students who have earned more than 90 
credits are subject to dismissal unless they have a 
QPA of 2.0 or better. Students who accumulate 
three F grades in one semester are subject to dis- 
missal. Appeals of academic dismissal must be 
directed to the appropriate College or School 
Committee on Student Standing. Students subject 
to the jurisdiction of the appropriate Committee 
on Student Standing in accordance with the estab- 
lished guidelines who are permitted to re-enroll on 
a full-time basis but continue participation in non- 
curricular and extra-curricular activities shall be 
without appeal if they are subsequently dismissed 
from the University for poor scholarship. 

DEANS LIST 

To achieve distinction of being named to the 
Dean's List, a student must have a record for a 
semester that shows completion of a full-time 
schedule, a quality point average of at least 3.25, 
and no grade lower than C. The full-time schedule 
must include at least 12 credits exclusive of pass/ 
fail credits. 

GRADUATE COURSES FOR 
UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

Qualified seniors may be permitted to register in 
certain graduate courses at the 500 level for under- 
graduate credit on the recommendation of the 
advisor and with the approval of the dean of the 
graduate school involved. All 500 courses are 
described in the graduate school catalogs. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

The candidate for a University degree must be a 
person of good moral character who has satisfacto- 
rily completed all academic requirements for the 
degree program and in addition has the recom- 
mendation of the appropriate Academic Dean, 
filed the Application for the University Degree 
with the Office of the Registrar on or before the 
latest date to apply for graduation as announced in 
the Academic Calendar, and paid all indebtedness 
to the University. 



157 



It is the student's responsibility to determine 
that the courses taken in each semester are sequen- 
tially correct and necessary for the degree 
program. 

The student must periodically review in consul- 
tation with the appropriate academic advisor pro- 
gress toward graduation and seek, with the advi- 
sor, the resolution of any question about 
fulfillment of graduation requirements. 

Each school and each department sets forth in 
this catalog requirements for graduation which the 
student is expected to know, as well as the afore- 
mentioned general requirements, and the 
following: 

1. The bachelor's degree requires a minimum of 
120 semester hours of course credits in all except 
Radiological Health, Medical Technology, and 
Pharmacy which require, respectively, 123, 125, 
and 160 credits. 

2. All bachelor's degrees require an overall mini- 
mum quality point average of 2.0, which is a C 
grade average in a 4.0 system. (Students should 
further determine the need for minimum QPA 
requirements in their major, science course, etc.) 

3. The last year's work (a minimum of 30 semes- 
ter hours of credit) must be completed in residence 
at the University. 

4. Not less than three credits (or one course) in 
theology are required for all undergraduate Catho- 
lic students in every program at the University. 

5. Students on academic probation may be can- 
didates for graduation only with permission of the 
Committee on Student Standing of their school. 

The candidate who has satisfied graduation 
requirements by a Challenge Examination (credit 
by examination), when taken timewise within the 
last 30 semester hours of study for the degree, will 
fulfill the residence requirement provided a mini- 
mum of 30 semester hours of credit has been 
earned in course work at the University in the last 
year's study. 

HONORS 

Degrees are awarded with special mention cum 
laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude to 
students who have completed the regular course 
with unusual distinction and who have completed 
a minimum of 60 credits in residence. Honors are 
based on these standards: 

Cum Laude — Qaulity Point 

Average 3.50 to 3.74 

Magna Cum Laude — Quality Point 

Average 3.75 and above 

Summa Cum Laude — Upon recommendation of 
the faculty and a 3.90 QPA, the Magna Cum 
Laude citation may be raised to Summa Cum 
Laude. 

UNIT OF CREDIT 

The unit of credit is the semester hour; i.e., one 
credit equals one semester hour. One semester 
hour of credit is granted for the successful comple- 
tion of one hour a week of lecture or recitation, or 



58 



a least two hours a week of laboratory work for 
one semester of 15 weeks. 

TRANSFER WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY 

It would be to the student's advantage to discuss 
the proposed transfer with the academic advisor of 
the new school no later than two weeks prior to 
preregistration. The advisor will then use the form 
and procedure established as uniform for the Uni- 
versity to effect any change. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE 

First semester freshmen may withdraw from 
courses with the approval of their advisor up to 
the period of final examinations and receive a 
grade of W by processing the proper form. 

If a student, other than a first semester fresh- 
man, wishes to withdraw from a course, he may do 



so with the approval of his academic advisor and 
by processing the proper form up to the date 
announced in the Academic Calendar for with- 
drawal with a W grade. 

If a student wishes to withdraw from a course 
after the date announced in the Academic Calen- 
dar, the student must seek approval of the Com- 
mittee on Student Standing of the student's 
School. The student will be notified of the Com- 
mittee's decision. If approval is granted, the stu- 
dent then initiates the appropriate form through 
the advisor. 

A student who is not granted approval of the 
request and withdraws from the course unofficially 
will receive an F grade for the course. 




159 



Part VII: Directories 



Directors and Officers 



THE DUQUESNE CORPORATION 

Edward L. Murray, C.S.Sp Chairman 

John E. Nader, C.S.Sp Vice Chairman 

Francis M. Philben, C.S.Sp Secretary 

Louis F. Dolan, C.S.Sp. William R. Headley, C.S.Sp. 

Joseph A. Duchene, C.S.Sp. David L. Smith, C.S.Sp. 

Charles J. Fenner, C.S.Sp. Joseph L. Varga, C.S.Sp. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Officers 

A. William Capone Chairman of the Board 

Joseph A. Katarincic, Esq Vice Chairman of the Board 

Rev. Charles J. Fenner, C.S.Sp. ^T. Secretary of the Board 

Term Members 

Ronald T. Bowes Raymond J. Mulligan 

Robert J. Buckley Thomas J. Murrin 

J. Earl Burrell Most Rev. John B. McDowell, D.D. 

Richard Caligiuri Donald S. Nesti, C.S.Sp., S.T.D. 

Mrs. James L. Coleman, Jr. Henry X. O'Brien 

Robert A. dePalma James F. O'Day 

John F. Donahue Antonio J. Palumbo 

Francis R. Duffy, C.S.Sp.-^^ John L. Propst 

Herman Fineberg Joseph H. Ridge 

Merle E. Gilliand Daniel M. Rooney 

Edward I. Goldberg, Esq. Frank J. Schneider 

Carl G. Grefenstette Mrs. Elizabeth M. Scott 

William R. Headley, C.S.Sp. Richard S. Smith 

John J. Henry W. Bruce Thomas 

Robert E. Irr William A. Uricchio 

John M. Jendzura, C.S.Sp. Albert C Van Dusen 

Aaron P. Levinson Francis W. Wright, C.S.Sp. 

E. D. Loughney 

Joseph A. Massaro 

Associate Members 

Murry P. Berger Charles D. Horne 

Francis A. Devlin Daniel R. Lackner 

Sidney Dworkin James L. Snyder 

Edward F. Eddy Richard L. White 

OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Donald S. Nesti, C.S.Sp., S.T.D President 

Henry J. McAnulty, C.S.Sp Chancellor 

Rolando E. Bonachea, Ph.D Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Isadore R. Lenglet, M.P.A Vice President for Management and Business 

Dennis C. Golden, Ed.D Vice President for Student Life 

Kenneth P. Service Vice President for University Relations 

Charles J. Fenner, C.S.Sp., Ph.D Secretary 



160 



Administration and Faculty 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

ADMINISTRATION 

Jack W. Hausser, Ph.D Acting Dean 

Marguerite S. Puhl, M.Ed Assistant Dean for Administration 

Joan E. Deakins, M.Ed Director of Academic Advisement 

Anne D. Gyurisin, B.A Academic Advisor 

Edward H. Noll, M.Ed., M.A Academic Advisor 

Janice R. Grey, B.A Assistant to the Dean 

FACULTY 

Roger M. Angelelli Ralph C. Boettcher 
Lecturer in Speech Associate Professor of English 

B.S., California State College B.A., University of Detroit 

M.S., West Virginia University M.A., Columbia University 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh Clement C. Braszo 

Mary Frances Antolini Lecturer in Sociology 

Assistant Professor of Sociology B.A., Duquesne University 

B.A., M.A., Duquesne University M.S.W. University of Pittsburgh 

Shirley Arch- Kenneth Richard Boyd 
Lecturer in Sociology Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., University of Buffalo B -S-, Denison University 

M.S.W., University of Pittsburgh M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Samuel J. Astorino Geor g e Russe11 Bradley 
Professor of History Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., M.A.', Ph.D.," University of BS > Allegheny College 

Pittsburgh Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

J. D. Duquesne University Walter V. Burrows 

Daniel E. Barbush Assistant Professor of German 

Instructor in Mathematics BA ' MA ' Duquesne University 

B.S., Duquesne University Rev. Edward A. Bushinski, C.S.Sp. 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh Professor of Theology 

r , t „ B.D., St. Mary's Seminary 

Frank J. Baron c -r t it •♦ r-cu 

n f r n ■ , S.T.L., Univensty of Fnbourg 

Professor of Biologv », A ,-. TT • ■« 

n e r»u tVtt • • r r> i r M.A., Duquesne University 

B.S., Ph.D., University of California ph D Fordham University 

Anthony Barton Rev Leonard A Bushinski, C.S.Sp. 
Professor of Psychology Professor of Theology 

B A Ohio Wesleyan University B D St Gary's Seminary 

M. A, Ph.D., University of Chicago M A Duquesne University 

E. Jane Beckwith S.T.L., Gregorian University 

Lecturer in Journalism S.S.L., Pontificial Biblical Institute 

B.A., Seton Hill College Ronald G. Butler 
M.F.A., Pratt Institute Assistant Professor of Biology 

George Richard Benzinger, Jr. B.A., State University of Oswego 

Assistant Professor of English Ph.D., Syracuse University 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson Gillian C. Cannell 
M.A., University of Florida Lecturer in Art History 

Bernard F. Beranek B.A., M.A., University of Pittsburgh 

Associate Professor of English Peter A. Castric 
B.A., Notre Dame Professor of Biology 

M.A., Ph.D., Duquesne University B.S., Oregon State University 

Robert E. Beranek Ph.D., Montana State University 

Professor of Political Science Shih-Chi Chang 
B.A., St. Vincent College Professor of Physics 

M.A., Fordham University B.S., National Taiwan University 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh M.S., Ph.D., Kansas State University 



161 



Frances Jahrling Chivers 
Professor of English 
A.B., Smith College 
A.M., Columbia University 
Ph.D., University of Buffalo 

Jerry Clack 

Professor of Classics 

A.B., Princeton University 

M.A., Duquesne University 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

John A. Clair 

Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Duquesne University 

Ph.D., Western Reserve University 

Vicky A. Clark 
Lecturer in Art History 
A.B., UCLA 

A.M., University of California, Davis 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Francesca Colecchia 
Professor of Modern Languages 

and Department Chairman 
B.Ed., Duquesne University 
M.Litt., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Primitivo Colombo 
Professor Emeritus of French 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Pittsburgh 

Albert B. Costa 
Professor of History 
B.S., St. Mary's College, California 
M.S., Oregon State University 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Frank J. D'Amico 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
M.Sc, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Kathleen C. D'Appolonia 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Skidmore College 
M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Loren K. Davidson 
Associate Professor of English 
B.S., Asbury College 
M.A., University of Kentucky 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Dagobert de Levie 
Adjunct Professor of 
Modern Languages 
Ph.D., University of Basel 

\nna D'Eramo 
Laboratory Administrator in Physics 
B.S., Carlow College 

Donato A. DeFelice 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., M.S., University of Pittsburgh 



Eugene F. Del Vecchio 
Associate Professor of 

Modern Languages 
A.B., University of California 

(Berkeley) 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington 

Rev. Daniel N. DiNardo 
Lecturer in Special Studies 
B.A., M.A., Catholic University of America 
S.T.B., Pontifical Gregorian University 
S.T.L., Augustianum University 

Patricia M. Dunham 
Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.S., M.A., Ball State University 
Ph.D., Miami University of Ohio 

Howard G. Ehrlich 
Professor of Biology and 
Department Chairman 
B.S., Marquette University 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Lester Embree 
Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Tulane University 
Ph.D., New School for Social Research 

Eleanor V. Fails 
Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Satin Mary's College 
M.A., University of Notre Dame 
Ph.D., Loyola University of Chicago 

Norma Feinberg 
Associate Professor of Sociology 
M.S.W., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Rev. Charles J. Fenner, C.S.Sp. 
Associate Professor of Theology 
B.A., B.D., St. Mary's Seminary 
J.C.B., Gregorian University 

Rome, Italy 
M.A., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., Catholic University 

Constance Taylor Fischer 
Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Oklahoma 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

William Frank Fischer 
Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Michigan 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Lee Frank 
Lecturer in Sociology 
B.A., M.Ed., Indiana University of 

Pennsylvania 
M.A., Duquesne University 

Robert A. Friday 
Assistant Professor of Speech 

Communications and Theatre 
B.A., College of Steubenville 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



62 



Lawrence E. Gaichas 
Professor of Classics and 

1985-1986 Department Chairman 
B.A., Xavier University 
M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Edward L. Gelblum 
Assitant Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., St. John's College 
M.A., University of Chicago 

John D. Gibbs 
Assistant Professor of 

Journalisum 
B.S., West Virginia University 

Amedeo P. Giorgi 
Professor of Psychology 
A.B., St. Joseph's College 
M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Andrew J. Glaid III 
Professor of Chemistry and 

Department Chairman 
B.S., M.S., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., Duke University 

John B. Greenshields 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon 
University 

Edward J. Gregory 
Professor of Journalism 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University 
M.Ed., Duquesne University 

John Kenneth Hanes 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., St. Francis College 
M.A., Niagara University 

James P. Hanigan 
Associate Professor of Theology 
A.B., M.A., Fordham University 
B.D., Woodstock College 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Barry Hannegan 
Lecturer in Art History 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 
M.A., New York University 

Solange Bastelica Harrison 
Associate Professor of French 
B.A., Academy of Aix-Marseilles 
B.S., Faculte de Medicine, Marseilles 
M.A., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Jack W. Hausser 

Professor of Chemistry and Acting Dean 
B.S., Case Institute of Technology 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Samuel J. Hazo 
Professor of English 
B.A., University of Notre Dame 
M.A., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



Margaret R. Hicks 
Assistant Professor of 
Modern Languages 
B.A., Belhaven College 
M.A., Emory University 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Rev. J. Clifton Hill, C.S.Sp. 
Professor of Physics 
B.S., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Catholic University of America 
B.D., St. Mary's Seminary 
M.A., Ph.D., Rice University 

Beatrice T. Hirschl 
Lecturer in Journalism 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 

Eleanore Walkowski Holveck 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Duquesne University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina 

Jean E. Hunter 
Associate Professor of History 
B.S., Ursinus College 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Patricia S. Ingram 
Associate Professor and Director 

of Art History 
A.B., A.M., Oberlin College 

Jerome Edward Janssen 
Professor of History and 
Department Chairman 
B.A., St. Norbert College 
M.A., University of Wisconsin 

Peter R. Johnson 
Lecturer in Speech 
B.S., Northern Illinois University 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

James J. Johnston, Jr. 
Instructor in Speech 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 

Nancy C. Jones 
Professor of Journalism 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S. J., Northwestern University 
Ph.D., University of Missouri 

Eric Joy 

Lecturer in Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Duquesne University 

Chester A. Jurczak 

Professor of Sociology and 

Department Chairman 
B.A., St. Mary's College 
M.A., Fordham University 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Joseph J. Keenan 
Associate Professor of English 
and Department Chairman 
B.A., M.A., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 



163 



Donald H. Kellander 
Assistant Professor of French 
B.A., M.A., Pennsylvania State 
University 

Rev. David F. Kelly 

Associate Professor of Theology 
B.A., College of the Holy Cross 
M.A., S.T.B., Catholic University 

of Louvain 
M.Rel.Ed., Loyola University, Chicago 
Ph.D., University of St. Michael's College 

Rev. Charles D. Keyes 
Professor of Philosophy and 

Department Chairman 
B.A., University of Okalahoma 
B.D., S.T.M., Seabury-Western 

Theological Seminary 
M.A., University of Toronto 
Th.D., Trinity College, Toronto 
Ph.D., Duquesne University 

Yong I. Kim 
Associate Professor of English 
B.A., Aoyama Gakuim, Tokyo 
B.A., Florida Southern College 
M.A., University of Kentucky 

Richard T. Knowles 
Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., M.S., Fordham University 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Paul Krakowski 
Professor of Journalism and 

Acting Department Chairman 
B.A., Westminster College 
M.A., University of Wisconsin 

Michael Kupersanin 
Professor of Sociology 
A.B., M.A., Kent State University 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Albert C. Labriola 
Professor of English 
B.Ed., Duquesne University 
M.A.T., Columbia University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Rosaline H. Lee 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Webster College 
M.E., University of Michigan 
Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Norman C. Li 
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 
B.S., Kenyon College 
M.S., University of Michigan 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Pei-Tsing Liu 
Professor of Biology 
B.S., University of Shanghai, China 
M.S., Boston University 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



Charles A. Loch 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

and Department Chairman 
B.A., M.A., Duquesne University 

Carla E. Lucente 
Professor of Modern Languages 
B.A., M.A., Duquesne University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

James G. Lydon 
Professor of History 
B.A., Harvard University 
M.A., Boston University 
M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Robert E. Madden 
Associate Professor Philosophy 
B.S., St. Joseph's College 
M.A., Villanova University 
Ph.D., Duquesne University 

Charles D. Maes 
Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Denver 
M.S.W., Tulane University 
Ph.D., Duquesne University 

Anne M. Maier 
Assistant Professor of German 
B.A., Columbia University 
M.A., University of Illinois 

Rev. Francis X. Malinowski, C.S.Sp. 
Associate Professor of Theology 
B.A., St. Mary's Seminary 
B.S.Th., University of Fribourg 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Brian Malloy 
Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.S., LaSalle College 
M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

Susan Maloney 
Assistant Professor of Journalism 
B.A., B.S., Syracuse University 
M.A., Duquesne University 

Dolores C. Mandel 
Assistant Professor in Sociology 
B.A., Slippery Rock State College 
M.S.W., University of Pittsburgh 

Edward J. Markoff 
Lecturer in Mathematics 
B.S., M.A., Duquesne University 

William Ewalt Markus 
Assistant Professor of Political Science 

and Department Chairman 
B.A., Harvard University 
M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

Paul Tyler Mason 
Professor of History 
B.S., M.A.! Ph.D., St. Louis University 

Cornelius S. McCarthy 
Professor Emeritus of Journalism 
B.S.J., Ed.M., Boston University 



164 



James A. McCulloch 
Professor of Classics 
B.A., Duquesne University 
M.Litt., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Willard M. Mecklenburg 
Associate Professor of Journalism 
B.A., Hamline University 
B.D., Garrett Theological Seminary 
M.S.J., Northwestern University 

Patrick J. Moore 
Lecturer in Sociology 
B.A., M.A., Duquesne University 

Kent F. Moors 
Associate Professor of 

Political Science 
A.B., St. Anselm's College 
M.A., University of New Hampshire 
Ph.D., Northern Illinois University 

Joseph R. Morice 
Professor of History 
B.A., LaSalle College 
M.A., Fordham University 
M.Litt., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Rev. Edward L. Murray, C.S.Sp. 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., M.A., St. Vincent College 
M.A., Ph.D., Duquesne University 

Stephen T. Newmyer 
Professor of Classics 
B.A., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Reginald A. Ney 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

and University Health Physicist 
B.S., Duquesne University 
M.S., University of Pittsburgh 

Sarah C. Nichols 

Lecturer in Art History 

B.A., University of East Anglia 

M.A., University of Delaware 

Jerome L. Niedermeier 
Associate Professor of English 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 
M.A., Ph.D., Duquesne University 

Hon. Raymond A. Novak 
Lecturer in Sociology 
B.A., St. Vincent College 
B.A., S.T.B., S.T.L., St. Mary's University 
M.S.W., J.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Rev. John F. O'Grady 
Professor of Theology 

and Department Chairman 
B.A., M.Div., Mary Immaculate College 

and Seminary 
S.T.L., College of St. Anselm 
S.T.D., University of St. Thomas 
S.S.L., S.S.D., Pontifical Biblical 

Institute 



Rev. William M. Ogrodowski 
Lecturer in Classics 
B.A., Duquesne University 
S.T.L., S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University 

John Opie, Jr. 

Professor of History 

B.A., DePauw University 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Margaret J. Patterson 
Assistant Professor of Journalism 
B.S., Ohio University 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh 

Ann C. Peterson 
Lecturer in Art History 
B.A., M.A., University of Pittsburgh 

Dr. James F. Pletcher 
Adjunct Professor of Physics 
B.S., Franklin and Marshall 
M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Ronald M. Polansky 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Yale University 
M.A., Ph.D., Boston College 

G. Foster Provost, Jr. 
Professor of English 
B.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.A., University of Oregon 

Peter A. Puccetti 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., M.Ed., Duquesne University 

Terry Pulver 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Constance Deucher Ramirez 
Associate Professor of English 
B.A., Duquesne University 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

J. Roland Ramirez 
Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., University of Notre Dame 
Licentiate, Le Saulchoir, Etiolles, France 
Ph.D., Catholic University of Paris 

Paul A. Richer 
Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Bard College 
M.A., Ph.D., New School for Social Research 

Rev. Robert Roach, C.S.Sp. 
Lecturer in Theology 
B.A., B.D., St. Mary's Seminary 
M.A., Notre Dame University 

Eva Cappellanti Robotti 
Associate Professor of Speech 
Communication and Theatre 
and Department Chairman 
A.B., M.A., West Virginia University 



65 



Susan A. Ross 
Assistant Professor of Theology 
B.A., Manhattanville College 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Hershel Sacks 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
M.A., Yeshiva University 

Marie Ciccone Sakmar 
Instructor in Spanish 
A.B., Geneva College 
M.A., Western Reserve University 

John D. Scanlon 

Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., St. Mary's Seminary 
M.A., University of Detroit 
Ph.D.. Tulane University 

Marilyn Schaub 
Professor of Theology 
B.A., Rosary College 
Ph.D., University of Fribourg 

Kurt C. Schreiber 
Professor of ' Chemist y 
B.S., City College of New York 
A.M., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Rev. Andre L. Schuwer, O.F.M. 
Adjunct Professor of Philosophy 
B.Ph., State University of Amsterdam 
Licenciate, Ph.D., University of Louvain 

David W. Seybert 
Associate Professor of 

Chemistry 
B.A., Bloomsburg State College 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

William W. Shaw 
Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.S., National Taiwan Normal University 
M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

Stephen J. Shulik 
Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S., Duquesne University 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Aris Sideropoulos 
Associate Professor of Biology 
B.A., Concordia College 
M.S., North Dakota State University 
Ph.D., University of Kansas 

Walter S. Skinner 
Professor of Physics and 
Department Chairman 
B.S., Monmouth College 
M.S., Lehigh University 

Eugenia M. Skwarecki 
Associate Professor of Modern Languages 
Doctor of Modern Languages and 
Literature, University of Turin, Italy 

John W. Smeltz 
Associate Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Duquesne University 



Rev. David L. Smith, C.S.Sp. 
Associate Professor of Psychology 

and Department Chairman 
B.A., St. Mary's Seminary 
S.T.L., University of Fribourg 
M.A., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., University of Montreal 

Martin D. Snyder 
Professor of Classics and Chairman, 

Department of Special Studies 
A.B., Loyola College, Baltimore 
M.A., Ph.D., Catholic University of 

America 

Paul B. Stein 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., University of Massachusetts 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Omar W. Steward 
Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., University of Delaware 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Michael W. Strasser 
Professor of Philosophy 
B.S., St. Louis University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Tata Subhas 
Professor of Biology 
B.Sc, Utkal University, India 
Bachelor of Veterinary Science, 
University of Madras, India 
M.S., Utah State University 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Dr. Grace S. Sung 
Lecturer in Audiology 
B.A., Ewha Womans University, 

Seoul, Korea 
M.A., University of Iowa 
Ph.D., University of Kansas 

Rev. Edmund R. Supple, C.S.Sp. 
Adjunct Associate Professor 

of Theology 
B.A., St. Mary's Senior Scholasticate 
S.T.L., Gregorian University (Rome) 

Kathleen A. Taylor 
Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., University of Dayton 
M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Richard H. Thames 
Associate Professor of Speech 

Communication and Theatre 
B.A., Southwestern-at-Memphis 
M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Steven P. Thomas 
Professor of Biology 
B.A., Pennsylvania State University 
M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Frank J. Thornton 
Associate Professor of Speech 

Communication and Theatre 
B.S., M.A., Villanova University 



166 

Samuel J. Tindall, Jr. 
Associate Professor of English 
A.B., Columbia University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of South 
Carolina 

Rev. Cornelius Van der Poel, C.S.Sp. 
Associate Professor of Theology 
M.Ed., Iona College 

Steven Bela Vardy 
Professor of History 
B.S., John Carroll University 
M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Rev. Joseph L. Varga, C.S.Sp. 
Lecturer in Modern Languages 
B.A., St. Mary's Seminary 
M.Ed., Duquesne University 

Rolf H. Von Eckartsberg 
Associate Professor of Psychology 
A.B., Dartmouth College 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Mrs. Peggy Walrath 
Lecturer in Speech 
Certified Comprehensive Interpreter 

Jin Tsai Wang 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Oregon State University 
M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Harold Webb, Jr. 
Professor of Political Science 
B.A., M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Ph.D., Brown University 

Theodore J. Weismann 
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Duquesne University 

SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND 
AUDIOLOGY— ADJUNCT FACULTY 



Bernard J. Weiss 
Professor of History 
B.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
M.A., University of Chicago 

Charles I. Westbrooks 
Lecturer in Sociology 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

George S. Worgul, Jr. 
Associate Professor of Theology 
B.A., M.D., M.A., Niagara University 
Ph.D., S.T.D., Catholic University of 
Louvain 

Rev. Donald W. Wuerl 

Lecturer in Special Studies 

B.A., M.A., Catholic University of America 

S.T.L., Pontifical Gregorian University 

S.T.D., Pontifical University of St. Thomas 
William Stephan Wurzer 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Oakland University 

Ph.D., University of Freiburg 

Joseph Yenerall 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.S., California State College 

M.A., Duquesne University 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Frank T. Zbozny 

Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Duquesne University 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



Harmarville Rehabilitation Center 

Robert D. Jacisin, M.Ed. 

Director, Communication Skills Department 

Speech-Language Pathologist 
Gail B. Mieszkowski, M.S. 

Speech-Language Pathologist 
Diane Rosato, M.A. 

Speech-Language Pathologist 
Barbara A. Vento, M.S. 

Audiologist 

Rehabilitation Institute of Pittsburgh 

Mark Ylvisaker, M.A. 

Director, Speech-Language Therapy Department 

Speech-Language Pathologist 
Susan Hough, M.A. 

Speech-Language Pathologist 



St. Francis Hospital 

Rosemary Tomko, M.A., CCC-Sp. 

Director, Department of Communication Skills 
Eze Binstock, M.A. 

Speech-Language Pathologist 
Barbara Boas, M.S. 

Speech-Language Pathologist 
Eva Gillespie, M.A. 

Speech-Language Pathologist 
Janet Hodnik, M.A. 

Speech-Language Pathologist 
Hubert Martin, M.A. 

Speech-Language Pathologist 

Allegheny General Hospital 

Joanne McAleer, M.S. 
Speech-Language Pathologist 



167 

Western Pennsylvania School 
For Blind Children 

Gina Adams, M.Ed. 

Speech Pathologist 
Deborah J. Coletta, M.A. 

Language Development Specialist 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION 

ADMINISTRATION 

Glen Beeson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Acting Dean 

Bernadine Meyer, B.Ed., M.S., Ed.D., J.D Assistant Dean 

James F. Acklin, B.S., M.B.A., C.P.A., CM. A Chairman, Quantitative Sciences Division 

John F. Gardner, B.A., J.D., LL.M Chairman, Behavioral Sciences Division 

Geza Grosschmid, J.U.D Chairman, Economic Sciences Division 

Amy C. Jones, B.A., M.S.Ed Academic Advisor 

Cynthia M. Shade, B.A., M.S.Ed Academic Advisor 

FACULTY 

James F. Acklin William Carlson 

Associate Professor of Accounting Assistant Professor of Finance 

Chairman, Quantitative Sciences Division B.C.E., M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon 

B.S., M.B.A., Duquesne University University 

C.P.A., C.M.A., Pennsylvania Raymond Cegelski 
Priscilla Austin Associate Professor of Accounting 

Assistant Professor of Accounting B.S., M.B.A., Duquesne University 

B.S., Bucknell University C.P.A., Pennsylvania 

M.B.A., Duquesne University Petros c Christofi 

C.P.A., Pennsylvania Assistant Professor of Management Science 

Glen Beeson B.S., Graduate Industrial School of Thessaloniki 

Professor of Economics M.A., University of New Orleans 

Acting Dean, School of Business and Doctoral Candidate, Pennsylvania State Univer- 

Administration sity 

B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan Sylvia Denys 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh Assistant Professor of Law Administration 

Vashishta Bhaskar B.A., M.A., J.D., Duquesne University 

Assitant Professor of Finance Dean Frost 

B.S., St. Stephens College Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science 

M.B.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University g A Reed College 

Stanley Bober M.S., Ph.D., University of Washington 

Professor of Economics John Gardner 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University Assistant Professor of Taxation 

George Bodnar Chairman, Behavioral Science Division 

Associate Professor of Accounting B.A., King's College 

B.S., B.A., Bucknell University J.D., Duquesne University 

M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania L.L.M., Temple University 

Richard Bond Lee Glick 

Associate Professor of Economics Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B., Boston College B.A., M.A., M.Litt., Ph.D., University 

Ph.D., University of Maryland of Pittsburgh 

Robert Borman Geza Grosschmid 

Associate Professor of Accounting Professor of Economics 

B.S., Duquesne University Chairman, Economics Division 

M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh J.U.D., Royal Hungarian University 

C.P.A., Pennsylvania Pazmany Peter 

Peter Brown Serge Grosset 

Associate Professor of Analytic Methods Professor of International Business 

B.S., Canisius College License es Sciences Commerciales, 

M.B.A., Duquesne University Doctorat es Sciences Economiques, 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh University of Geneva 



168 



David Hanson 
Associate Professor 
B.A., Haverford College 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
J.D., University of Michigan 

Norman Hopmayer 

Visiting Professor of Management 
B.S., M.S., Northwestern University 
M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Clarence Jones 
Associate Professor of Analytic Methods 
B.S.E.E., University of California 
M.S.E.E., West Virginia University 
Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Blair J. Kolasa 
Professor of Behavioral Science 

and Dean Emeritus 
B.S., Allegheny College 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
J.D., Duquesne University 

Marshall Levinson 
Associate Professor of Economics 
B.S., City College of New York 
M.A., Princeton University 
M.A., Columbia University 

Gustav Lundberg 
Assistant Professor of Economic Geography 
B.A., Swedish School of Economics 
B.Sc, M.Sc, University of Helsinki 
Ph.D., State University of New York 
(Buffalo) 

Dwight Means 

Visiting Associate Professor of Finance 
B.S.E.E., Carnegie Mellon University 
M.B.A., Doctoral Candidate, University of Pitts- 
burgh 

Aubrey Lipman Mendelow 
Assistant Professor of Management 

Information Systems 
B.Sc, Rhodes University 
B. Compt., University of South Africa 
M.B.A., University of Cape Town 
D.B.L., University of South Africa 

Bernadine Meyer 
Professor of Law Administration 
Assistant Dean 

B.Ed., M.S., J.D., Duquesne University 
Ed.D., Columbia University 

George Might 
Assistant Professor of Analytic Methods 
B.S., Harvard University 
M.A., Boston University 

Edward A. Milcic 
Associate Professor of Accounting 
B.S., M.S., Duquesne University 
C.P.A., Pennsylvania 



J. James Miller 

Professor of Human Relations 
B.S., St. Vincent College 
M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Kenneth L. Paige 
Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.S.B.A., Duquesne University 
M.S., Kent State University 
Doctoral Candidate, University of Pittsburgh 

James Poindexter 
Assistant Professor of Industrial Relations 
B.S.B.A., University of Southern California 
M.B.A., Rochester Institute of Technology 
J.D., Texas Southern University 

William D. Presutti, Sr. 
Assistant Professor of Management and 

Marketing 
B.S.B.A., Duquesne University 
M.A., Northeastern University 
Doctoral Candidate, Carnegie-Mellon 

University 

Rev. Joseph Pudichery 
Assistant Professor of Analytic Methods 
B.A., M.A., University of Kerala 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Kurt Rethwisch 
Professor of Economics 
B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan University 
M.A., Kansas State 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Lewis Schipper 
Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A., M.A., Wayne State University 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

R. Stanley Seymour 
Assistant Professor of Commerce 
B.S., University of Notre Dame 
M.S., Kansas State Teachers College 

William Sher 
Professor of Economics 
B. of Law, National Yunnon University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

John C. South 
Professor of Organizational Behavior 
B.A., Muskingum College 
M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

John Timko 
Associate Professor of Marketing 
B.S., M.S., Duquesne University 

Frank J. Wright 
Associate Professor of Accounting 
B.S., Duquesne University 
M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



169 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



ADMINISTRATION 

Dorothy A. Frayer, Ph.D Dean 

Kenneth L. Burrett, Ed.D Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education 

Sr. Mary Frances Grasinger, Ph.D Associate Dean, Graduate Education 

FACULTY 

V. Robert Agostino William F. Faith 

Professor of Education Professor of Education 

B.S., Boston College B.Ed., Duquesne University 

M.S., University of Bridgeport M.Ed., Ph.D., Specialist Diploma, 

Ed.D., Ball State University University of Pittsburgh 

William P. Barone Dorothy A. Frayer 

Professor of Education Associate Professor of Education and 

B.S., M.A., West Virginia University Dean of the School of Education 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh B.A., M.S., Michigan State University 

Paul Bernstein PhD " University of Wisconsin 

Associate Professor of Education Mary Frances Grasinger, C.S.J. 

B.A., Hartwick College Associate Professor of Education 

M.S., Springfield College and Associate Dean, Graduate Education 

Ph.D., Ohio University B.Ed., Duquesne University 

Ruth G. Biro M.T.S., Catholic University of 

Associate Professor of Education _,, _ _ ¥I . 

B.A., Chatham College PhD > S y racuse University 

M.L.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. Nicholas J. Hanna 

Joseph T. Brennan ^/ n 5*f to, 1 ' . 

Professor of Education B f> MS >. The Pennsylvania State 

B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of „. \? IV S? ty TT • 

Pittsburgh Ph.D., Ohio University 

Kenneth L Burrett Sister Julia Ann Hartzo 8< sc 

Associate Professor of Education; Associate Professor of Education 

Associate Dean, Undergraduate u^ S Tn C ^ r „■ u u 

Education; Director of Student MEd - PhD - University of Pittsburgh 

Teaching and Field Experience Constance L. Hunter 

B.A., M.S.Ed., Canisius College Associate Professor of Education 

Ed.D., State University of New York, B.S.Ed., Ohio State University 

Buffalo M.A., George Peabody College 

William H. Cadugan PhD ' University of Pittsburgh 

Professor Emeritus of Education Joseph F. Maola 

B.S. in B.A., M.Ed., Duquesne Professor of Education 

University B.A., M.Ed., Duquesne University 

Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Bruno A. Casile PhD ' The University of Akron 

Professor Emeritus of Education Rick R. McCown 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College Assistant Professor of Education 

M.S., Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh A.B., Ph.D., Indiana University 

William J. Casile Michael F. Moran 

Assistant Professor of Education Associate Professor of Education 

B.S.Ed., Duquesne University B.S., Shippensburg State College 

M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh M.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

Rev. Louis F. Dolan, C.S.Sp. ^ Michigan State University 

Professor of Education PhD ' University of Pittsburgh 

BA., B.D., St. Mary's Seminary Frank M. Ribich 

M.A., Ed.S., Eastern Michigan Associate Professor of Education 

University B.Ed., M.Ed., Duquesne University 

Ph.D., University of Michigan Ed.D., The Pennsylvania State University 



170 



Alfonso A. Rizzo 
Professor of Education 
B.S., Massachusetts State College 
M.S., Springfield College 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

J. Bernard Smith 

Professor of Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Duquesne University 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Maureen Sullivan 
Assistant Professor of Education 
B.Ed., M.Ed, in L.S., Duquesne University 
M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh 
Ed.D., University of Sarasota 

LECTURERS 

Dorothy J. Agar 
B.S., Russell Sage College 
M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Donna C. Borza 
B.S.P.A., Nazareth College 
M.A., University of Iowa 

Ronald C. L. Conant 
A.B., Suffolk University 
M.Ed., Boston College 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



John L. Livingston 

B.S., Lock Haven State College 
M.Ed., Ed.D., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

Celine K. Long 

B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Duquesne University 
Graduate study, University of Pittsburgh 
and Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Sr. Carole Riley, C.D.P. 

B.S., M.E., Duquesne University 

Theodore A. Siedle 
B.S., Allegheny College 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

SUPERVISORS 

Quincy DiYenno 

M.S.Ed., Shippensburg University 
M.Ed., Doctoral Study, University 
of Pittsburgh 

Jeanne Graff 

B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Duquesne University 

Helen G. Smith 
B.S., Oakwood College 
M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 
Graduate study, Temple University 
and Loyola College at Baltimore 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

Michael Kumer, M.M.Ed Acting Dean 

Sister Carole Riley, C.D.P., Ph.D Assistant Dean 

Gerald F. Keenan, Ph.D Dean Emeritus 

FACIJTTY Christine Capecci 

Teacher of Voice 

Deborah Adams B.S.M.E.,* Duquesne University 
Coordinator of the Duquesne University 

Extension Training Program (DUET) Yee-ha Chiu 

B.A., Boston Universitv r^rofta 

M.M., Boston University P, 1 ? 1 , 01 "*' Julliard School of Music 

M.M., Duquesne University 
Sister Donna Marie Beck 

Professor of Music Therapy and Robert Clarke 

Coordinator of Music Therapy Division Teacher of Guitar and Coordinator 

Registered Music Therapist of Guitar Division 

B.S.M.E., M.M.Ed., Duquesne University BFA > Carnegie-Mellon University 

. . M.M., Duquesne University 
David Billings 

Teacher of Organ Robert J. Croan 

B.F.A., Penn State University Professor of Music 

M.M., Eastman School of Music B.A., M.A., Columbia University 

T , . . _. . Ph.D., Boston University 

Keith Bishop J 

Teacher of Saxophone Frank Cunimondo 

B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University Teacher of Jazz Piano 

David Budway Anthony Di Vittorio 

Teacher of Piano Teacher of Piano 

B.M., M.M., Duquesne University B.S., Duquesne University 

Kenneth Burky Robert F. Egan 

Associate Professor of Piano Professor of Music Education 

B.M., Oberlin Conservatory of Music B.S., Case Western Reserve University 

M.M., Indiana University M.A., Ph.D., New York University 



171 



Sumner Erickson 
Teacher of Tuba 
Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Joy Friedlander 
Teacher of Dance 

B.A. in Dance, University of California 
M.F.A., University of California 

Marino Galuzzo 

Teacher of Saxophone 
B. S.M.Ed., Duquesne University 
M.M., University of Michigan 
Mowhawk College, Canada 

James Gorton 
Teacher of Oboe 
B.M., Eastman School of Music 
Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Alan Grishman 
Associate Professor of Music 
Head of String Division 
B.S., Mannes College of Music 
M.A., New York University 

Robert D. Hamrick 
Teacher of Trombone 
B.M., M.M., West Virginia University 
Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

L.J. Hancock 

Teacher of Marching Band Methods 
B. S.M.Ed., Gettysburg College 

Richard Hiller 

Teacher of Jazz Ensemble 

B.M., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Rosette S. Hillgrove 
Teacher of Voice 
B.S.M.E., M.M.Ed., Duquesne 
University 

Charles Hois 

Teacher of Trumpet 

Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Al Homburg 

Teacher of Guitar 

M.M., West Virginia University 

Lynne Irvine 
Teacher of Viola 
B.M., M.M.. Julliard School 

of Music 
Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Joseph Wilcox Jenkins 

Professor of Theory and Composition and 

Coordinator of Composition, Music History 

and Literature Division 
B.S., St. Joseph's College, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 
B.M., M.M., Eastman School of Music, 

University of Rochester 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Carlton Jones 

Teacher of Bassoon 

B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

M.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 



Christine Jordanoff 
Associate Professor of Musicianship 
Coordinator of Music Enrollment 
B.S., M.M., Duquesne University 
Diploma, Kodaly Music Training 

Institute 
Certificate, Liszt Academy of Music, 

Budapest, Hungary 

Nicholas Jordanoff 

Artistic Director for the 

Performing Ensemble, Tamburitzan 
Institute of Folk Arts and Associate 
Professor 

M.Ed., Duquesne University 
Annabelle Joseph 

Teacher of Eurhythmies 

B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

M.M., Duquesne University 

D.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Eugenia Popescu Judetz 

Visiting Professor, Tamburitzan 
Institute of Folk Arts 

Bucharest, Romania 
Robert Kesselman 

Teacher of String Bass 

Certificate from the Curtis Institute of Music 

Eric KJoss 

Teacher of Saxophone 
B.A., Duquesne University 

Walter W. Kolar 
Director, Tamburitzan Institute of 
Folk Arts and Associate Professor 
M.Ed., Duquesne University 
Stephen Kovacev 
Assistant to the Director, Business 
Affairs, Tamburitzan Institute of 
Folk Arts and Associate Professor 
M.Ed., Duquesne University 
Nestor Koval 
Associate Professor of Woodwinds and 
Coordinator of Woodwind Division 
Paris Conservatory 

Jan Kraynok 

Teacher of French Horn 
B.M., Duquesne University, 

Chautauqua Institute 
Member of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra 

Michael Kumer 
Acting Dean, Assistant Professor 

of Music Education 
B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 
M.M.Ed., Duquesne University 

Wendy Webb Kumer 

Teacher of Flute 

B.S.M.E., Duquesne University 

M.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 
Tim Lautzenheiser 

Coordinator of the Mid East Program 

B.S.M.Ed., Ball State University 

M.A., University of Alabama 

Ph.D., Columbia Pacific 



172 

Robert Leininger 

Teacher of String Bass 
Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Pamela Lewis 
Teacher of Voice 
A.B., Middlebury College 
M.A., Stanford University 
M.F.A., D.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Charles E. Lirette 
Teacher of Trumpet 
B.M., Oberlin Conservatory of Music 
Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Charles Luizzi 

Teacher of Percussion 

B.M., University of Michigan, 

Temple University 
Graduate studies at Temple University 

Joseph Lukatsky 
Teacher of Oboe 
New England Conservatory 
Curtis Institute of Music 
Former Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Michael Maglio 
Associate Professor of Music Education 
B.S.E., Lowell University 
M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 
Certificat, LTfcole Normale de Musique, Paris 

John G. Maione 
Teacher of Guitar 
University of Pittsburgh 

Jeffery Mangone 

Teacher of String Bass 
B.S.M.E., Duquesne University 

Warren Mercer 
Director of Symphonic Band 
B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Elizabeth Moll 
Adjunct Professor of Musicianship 
B.M.E., Indiana University 
Graduate work at Indiana University 

at Bloomington and University 

of Pittsburgh 
Liszt Academy of Music, Hungary 

Vincent J. Monteleone 
Teacher of Trumpet 
B.M., M.M., Duquesne University 

John Moyer 
Accompanist, Opera Workshop 
B.S.M.E., Duquesne University 
M.M.E., Duquesne University 

Louis Munkachy 
Professor of Music Theory, Coordinator 

of Theory Division 
Diploma, Liszt Academy of Music, 

Budapest, Hungary 
Doctor of Laws and Political Science, 

Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary 
B.S., M.M., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



Joseph H. Negri 
Teach of Guitar 
Carnegie-Mellon University 
Affiliated with WTAE 

Beverly Nero 
Teacher of Piano 
B.S.M.E., M.M., Duquesne University 

Mija Novich 
Associate Professor of Voice and 

Director of Opera Workshop 
B.M.E., Northwestern University 
M.M., Duquesne University 

Patsy Oliver 

Teacher of Trumpet 

Ruth B. Osgood 
Teacher of Strings 
B.S.M.E., Duquesne University 

Frank Ostrowski 
Teacher of Trumpet 
New England Conservatory 
Former Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Joanne Pasquinelli 
Adjunct Professor of Music Therapy 
B.F.A., M.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 
Registered Music Therapist 

Gary Piecka 

Teacher of Lower Brass Instruments 
B.S.M.E., Duquesne University 
M.M., Duquesne University 

Leonard Pruszynski 
Teacher of Percussion 
B.S.M.E., Duquesne University 

John M. Raevens 
Associate Professor of Theory and Organ 
Lemmens, Institute, Mecheln, Belgium 

(Laureat) 
Royal Conservatory, Ghent, Gelgium — 
First Prize in Organ, Theory, History 

Peggy Kelley Reinburg 

Teacher of Organ and Sacred Music 
B.A., Mary Washington College 
M.M., Northwestern University 

Eric Richards 

Teacher of Jazz Studies 

B.S., M.M., Duquesne University 

Sister Carole Riley, CD. P. 
Professor of Music 
Assistant Dean 

B.S., M.M., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., Institute Formative Spirituality 

Carmen Rummo 
Adjunct Associate Professor of Piano 

Linda Sanders 
Adjunct Professor of Music Therapy 
Registered Music Therapist 
B.S., Duquesne University 
M.R.E., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
B.M., Westminster College 



73 



Ronald Schneider 

Teacher of French Horn 

B.M., Eastman School of Music 

Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

William Schneiderman 
Teacher of Percussion 
Diploma, Julliard School of Music 
Former Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Carolyn Shankovich 

Teacher of Choral Methods 
B.S.M.E., Indiana University of Pa. 
M.M., University of Michigan 

Robert Shankovich 
Director of Graduate Division 
Professor of Music Theory 
Coordinator of Choral Activities 

of I "oice Division 
B.S.M.E., M.M., Duquesne University 
D.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Allen Sher 

Teacher of I 'ioloncello 
B.A., Brooklyn College 
M.A., Columbia University 

Roger Sherman 
Teacher of Trumpet 
B.M.E., M.M.E., Eastman School 

of Music 
Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Matthew Shiner 
Adjunct Associate Professor of 
Brass Instruments and 
Coordinator of Brass Faculty 

Lisa Silko Spang 
Teacher of Piano 
B. S.M.Ed., M.M., Duquesne University 

Benjamin Speigel 
Teacher of Bassoon 
Former Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Ann Labounsky Steele 
Associate Professor of Organ, Coordinator 

of Organ and Sacred Music Faculty 
B.M., Eastman School of Music 
M.M., University of Michigan 
Diploma, (Mention Maximum), Schola 

Cantorum, Paris 
Diploma, Ecole Normale, Paris 
Ph.D. Candidate, University of Pittsburgh 



Gladys Stein 
Associate Professor of Piano 
Diploma, B.S., M.S., Julliard 

School of Music 
Special Artist Degree, Vienna 

State Academy 

Rev. Moshe Taube 
Teacher of Voice 
Diploma, Julliard School of Music 

David P. Tessmer 

Teacher of Flute 

B.A., Houston Baptist College 

M.M., Duquesne University 
Thomas D. Thompson 

Teacher of Clarinet 

B.M.E., American Conservatory 

M.M., Northwestern University 

Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Gerald Unger 

Teacher of Percussion and 

Coordinator of Percussion Division 
B.S., B.M., Ohio State University 
M.A., University of Northern Colorado 
Member, Pittsburgh Symphony 

Gretchen Van Hoesen 
Teacher of Harp 
B.M., Julliard School of Music 
M.M., Julliard School of Music 

Sandra Staley Vaporetti 

Teacher of Voice 
Jean Wilmouth 

Teacher of Percussion 

B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

John H. Wilson 
Associate Professor of Music 

Education and Coordinator of Jazz Division 
B.S., M.A., Ed.D., New York University 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
ADMINISTRATION 

Ruth Maszkiewicz, R.N., Ph.D. 



Dean 



FACULTY 

Catherine Arenz, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing 
B.S.N., Seton Hill University 
M.N.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 



Irene Dittemore, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. , Vanderbilt University 
M.Litt., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Mary Lou Ende, R.N. 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., Duquesne University 
M.N.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 



174 



Eileen Gimper, R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., Duquesne University 
M.N., University of Pittsburgh 
(Doctoral Student, University of Pittsburgh) 
Marie M. Hansen, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. E., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S.N., University of Maryland 
(Doctoral Student, University of Pittsburgh) 

Gladys L. Husted, R.N. 

Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N. , M.N.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

(Doctoral Student, University of Pittsburgh) 

Barbara Martuscelli, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., Pennsylvania State University 
M.N.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 
(Doctoral Student, University of Pittsburgh) 

Mary Carroll Miller, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., Duquesne University 
M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania 
M.A., Duquesne University 

Margaret L. Muntz, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., Duquesne University 
M.N., University of Pittsburgh 
(Doctoral Student, University of Pittsburgh) 



Margaret M. McKenna, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. , Duquesne University 
M.N.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

Natalie Pavlovich, R.N. 
Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., University of Arizona 
M.A., M.S.N., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Joanne Tate, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. , Point Park College 
M.S.Ed., Duquesne University 
M.N.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 
(Doctoral Student, University of Pittsburgh) 

Shirley Y. Wheeler, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. , M.N.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

Evelyn M. Wilczynski, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. , M.Ed., Duquesne University 

M. Kathleen Winter, R.N. 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., Duquesne University 
M.P.H., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 




175 



COOPERATING HEALTH AGENCIES 

Allegheny County Health Department 

Sally Bauer, RN, BSN 

Chief of Public Health Nursing 

Allegheny General Hospital 

Deborah Straka, RN 
Student Affiliations Coordinator 

Central Medical Center & Hospital 

P. J. Dolan, RN 

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh 

Joan Bishop, RN, MN 
Associate Administrator and 
Director of Nursing 

Forbes Health System 

Oxsana Byczkalo, MEd 
Training Manager 

Forbes Metropolitan Health Center 

Maureen Kane, RN, BSN, LittM 

Assistant Executive Director 

Forbes Regional Health Center 

Marie Langan, RN, BSEd 
Assistant Executive Director 

Forbes Center for Gerontology 

Eileen Meyer, RN, BSN 

Assistant Executive Director 

Magee-Womens Hospital 

Lucille Reynolds, RN, MNEd 

Director, Nursing Service Administration 

Mercy Hospital 

Margaret Taylor, RN 
Centralized Nurse Educator- 
Nursing Resource Department 

Montefiore Hospital 

Joan W. Beyer, RN, MPH 

Associate Administrator 



Northwest Allegheny Home Health Care 

Carolyn Smith, RN 
Director 

Presbyterian-University Hospital 

Maureen Rusnock, RN, MN, MNEd 
Senior Vice President 
Nursing Service 

South Hills Health System 
Home Health Agency 

Mary Ann Miller, RN, BSN, MPH 
Director of Staff Development 

South Hills Health System 
Jefferson Center 

Joan Rosgony, RN 
Administrator, Acute Care 

South Side Hospital 

Mary Paula Pavinich, RN, BSN, MNEd 

Assistant Vice President, Nursing 

St. Clair Memorial Hospital 

Yvonne M. Holsinger, RN, MNEd 
Director of Nursing 

St. Francis General Hospital 

Agnes Marner, RN, BASoc 
Director of Nursing Service 

Visiting Nurse Association of 
Allegheny County, Inc. 

Barbara Piskor, BSN, MPH 
Assistant Director, Education 

Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic 

Jacqueline Dunbar, RN, PhD 

Director of Nursing 




176 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
ADMINISTRATION 

Douglas H. Kay, Ph.D Dean 

Alvin Galinsky, Ph.D Assistant Dean 

Stephen C. Morrison, M.A Assistant to the Dean for Academic Advisement 

FACULTY 

Syed E. Abidi Raymond A. Eder 

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutics Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 

B.S. (Pharm.), Karachi University B.S. (Pharmacy), Pharm.D., 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Mississippi Duquesne University 

Anthony J. Amadio Joseph A. Feldman 

Professor of Pharmaceutical Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Administration B.S. (Pharmacy), University of 

B.S., M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh Rhode Island 

B.S., (Pharmacy), M.B.A., Duquesne M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

University _, , „ 

Kenneth A. Ferrett 

Lawrence H. Block Associate Professor of Clinical 

Professor of Pharmaceutics Pharmacy 

B.S., (Pharmacy), M.S., Ph.D. B s (Pharmacy), West Virginia 

University of Maryland University 
Mitchell L. Borke - Pharm.D., Duquesne University 

Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry Frederick W. Fochtman 

B.S (Pharmacy) M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology and 

University of Illinois Toxicology 

Martin Cohen B.S. (Pharmacy), M.S., Ph.D., 

Instructor in Medical Technology Duquesne University 
(Hematology) 

M.D., California College of Medicine , nry K " „ ea J r _.. . , nl 

Associate Projessor of Clinical Pharmacy 

Charles C Collins B s (Pharmacy), Pharm.D., Duquesne ' 

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutics University 

B.S. (Pharm.), West Virginia University 

Ph.D., West Virginia University Alvin M - Galinsky 

... „ _ ^ „ Professor of Pharmaceutics 

Wellon D. Collom B s (Pharmacy)j M>s Ph-D 

Instructor in Toxicology University of Illinois 

B.S., University of California 

M.S., Duquesne University Aleem Gangjee 

r • r. Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical 

Ezio Compare r , . J 

Associate Professor of Medical „ w e /L, . T ,. 

^ , j /c j • ; i B.S., M.S. (Chemistry), Indian 

Technology (Endocrinology) T . , c -r L / 

M.D., Padua, Italy JTT- f ? }° gY 

Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Jeanne A. Cooper 

Professor of Medical Technology and Mai *y A " n Gasowski 

Director, Mercy School of Medical . Health Physicist 

Technology (Parasitology) BS - Duquesne University 

B.S., Waynesburg College " MS - Health Physics, University of 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College Pittsburgh 

Richard R. Crowe John Georgescu 

Instructor in Medical Technology Instructor in Medical Technology 

(Immunology) (Virology) 

Sister M. Gonzales Duffy, R.S.M. ^m"^^^ ^"^ 

Lecturer in Hospital Pharmacy and • ■ \ ) 

Consultant, Department of Pharmacy, Vincent J. Giannetti 

Mercy Hospital Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical 

B.A., Carlow College Administration 

B.S. (Pharmacy), Duquesne University B.A., M.A., Duquesne University 

M.A., Villanova University M.S.W., M.S. (Hyg.), Ph.D., 

D.Sc. (Hon.), Duquesne University University of Pittsburgh 






177 



Raymond A. Giudici 
Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutics 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Pharm.D., Duquesne 
University 

Joyce Hahn 

Instructor in Medical Technology 

(Blood Banking) 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh 
M.T. (ASCP) 

Marilyn F. Harris 
Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical 

Administration 
B.S. P., University of Saskatchewan 
M.S., Duquesne University 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Benjamin Hodes 
Professor of Pharmaceutics 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Albany College of 

Pharmacy 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Michael Israel 
Instructor in Medical Technology 

(Hematology) 
M.D., University of Vermont 

Charles N. Karnack 

Clinical Instructor in Pharmacy 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Pharm.D., 
Duquesne University 

Douglas H. Kay 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy and 

Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
B.S. (Pharmacy), M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts 

College of Pharmacy and Allied 

Health Sciences 

Spyros Kominos 
Associate Professor of Medical 

Technology (Microbiology) 
B.S., M.S., Duquesne University 
D.Sc, University of Pittsburgh 

Joseph M. Kristofik 
Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical 

Administration and Director of Externship 
B.S. (Pharmacy), J.D., Duquesne 

University 

John G. Lech 
Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Pharm.D., Duquesne 
University 

M. Elaine Linkhauer 

Instructor in Medical Technology 
and Education Coordinator, 
Mercy School of Medical Technology 

(Microbiology, Parsitology, Mycology) 

B.A., Carlow College 

M.T. (ASCP) 

M.S., Duquesne University 

Bruce Livengood 
Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Temple University 
Pharm.D., Duquesne University 



Elsie M. Lovsted 
Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Ph.D., University 

of Minnesota 

Bruce D. Martin 
Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Albany College of 

Pharmacy 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Thomas J. Mattei 
Associate Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy and Director of 

Pharmacy, Mercy Hospital 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Pharm.D., Duquesne 

University 

Reginald A. Ney 
Health Physicist 
B.S., Duquesne University 
M.S., University of Pittsburgh 

Norbert A. Pilewski 
Associate Professor of Pharmacognosy 
B.S. (Pharmacy), M.S., University of 

Pittsburgh 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Therese I. Poirier 
Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Albany College of Pharmacy 
Pharm.D., University of Michigan 

Thomas L. Rihn 
Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Pharm.D. 
Duquesne University 

Gene A. Riley 

Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S. (Pharmacy), Duquesne University 

Ph.D., Western Reserve University 

Lisa N. Schatz 
Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy 
B.S. (Pharmacy), University of Pittsburgh 
Pharm.D., University of Cincinnati 

William I. Smith 
Instructor in Medical Technology 

(Clinical Chemistry, Immunology) 
M.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Donna Traeger 
Instructor in Medical Technology 

(Hematology, Urinalysis) 
B.S., Carlow College 
M.T. (ASCP) 
M.S., University of Pittsburgh 

Wagdy W. Wahba 
Instructor in Pharmacology 

and Toxicology 
B. Pharm., Alexandria University 
Ph.D., Duquesne University 

Rita M. Windisch 
Associate Professor of Medical 

Technology (Clinical Chemistry) 
B.S., Ph.D., Duquesne University 



78 



Charles L. Winek 
Professor of Toxicology 
B.S. (Pharmacy), M.S., Duquesne 

University 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 



Gerard J. Wolf 
Instructor in Pharmacy 
B.S. (Pharmacy), Duquesne University 



AUXILIARY FACULTY 

John J. Abbott, R.Ph. 
Adjunct Assistant Professor of 

Pharmaceutical Administration 
Sales Manager, The Upjohn Company 

Harvey M. Arbit, Pharm.D. 

Manager, Clinical Research and Regulatory 
Affairs, 

Medical Products Division — 3M 

St. Paul. MN 
Jagdesh P. Bhatnagar, Sc.D. 

Adjunct Research Professor 

Chief, Division of Radiation Physics, 
Mercy Hospital 
William K. Buchanan, M.D. 

Director of the Department of Anesthesia 

St. Francis General Hospital 

Earl R. Davis, M.D. 

Pathologist 

South Hills Health Systems 
Norman Haywood, J.D. 

Livingston and Miller, Attorneys at Law 
Carl Kaplan, M.D. 

Chairman 

Division of Radiation Therapy 

Radiology Department, Mercy Hospital 
Arthur Katoh, Ph.D. 

Research Associate 

Radiology Department, Mercy Hospital 

Philip W. Keys 
Adjunct Assistant Professor of 

Clinical Pharmacy 
B.S. (Pharmacy), West Virginia 

University 
Pharm.D., Duquesne University 



Delbert D. Konnor, M.S., R.Ph. 
Adjunct Professor of Pharmaceutical 

Administration; Manager, Voluntary 

Compliance Program 
Drug Enforcement Administration, 
U.S. Department of Justice 

Harold N. McFarland, Ph.D. 
Adjunct Professor of Toxicology 

Lawrence M. Mulhern, M.D. 
Chief of the Division of Rheumatology 
Mercy Hospital 

Edward J. Pavsek, M.D. 
Associate Professor of Medical Technology 
Chairman, Department of Radiology, 
Mercy Hospital 
Silvestri Silvestri 
Judge 

Court of Common Pleas, 
Fifth Judicial District, 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 

Elliott Turbiner, D.O. 

Associate Professor of Medical Technology 
Division of Nuclear Radiology and 
Ultrasound, Mercy Hospital 

Joseph A. Watson, Ph.D. 
Adjunct Professor of Radiology 
Graduate School of Public Health, 
University of Pittsburgh 



PHARMACIST-PRECEPTORS 
PRACTICAL PHARMACY II, III, IV 

Thomas L. Ague 
Director of Pharmacy 
Columbia Health Center 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Joseph F. Aiello 

Elk County General Hospital 
Ridgway, PA 

Peter Alt 
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Dr. Ted Anderer 
Williamsport Hospital 
Williamsport, PA 

Joan Ansberry 

Stradefs Pharmacy 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Thomas F. Bache 

St. Francis General Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 



Robert Baird 
Youngstown Hospital Association 
Youngstown, OH 

Fred H. Bender 
St. Vincent Health Center 
Erie, PA 

Anthony J. Betz, III 
Betz Pharmacy 
McMurray, PA 

T. J. Bianculli 
Sycamore Pharmacy, Inc. 
Pittsburgh, PA 

John D. Bridges 
South Side Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Max E. Callaghan 
Callaghan's Pharmacy 
Franklin, PA 



179 



Barbara Carson 
Director of Pharmacy Services 
Medical Center of Beaver County 
Beaver, PA 

Josephine S. Certo, Ph.D. 

Director of Pharmacy 
Forbes Health System 
East Suburban Health Center 
Monroeville, PA 

Kristen L. Buckley 
Rca and Derick, Inc. 
Clearfield, PA 

Patti Connery 
Jim Sarbeck 

Syntex Laboratories Inc. 
Palo Alto, CA 

Kathy Contrucci 
Armstrong County Memorial Hospital 
Kittanning, PA 

Connie Cubellis 
Shenango Valley 
Osteopathic Hospital 
Farrell, PA 

Virgil J. Davis 
Lee Hospital Pharmacy 
Johnstown, PA 

Phillip V. DeMarco 
Westmoreland Hospital Association 
Greensburg, PA 

James Demmy 

Somerset Hospital Pharmacy 
Somerset, PA 

Carmen DiCello 

Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical Association 
Harrisburg, PA 

Allen H. Dicken 

Memorial Hospital of Bedford County 
Everett, PA 

Denise DiNunzio 
Chief Pharmacist 
Monsour Medical Center 
Jeannette, PA 

Nick DiSilvio 
West Penn Pharmacy 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Georgine A. Dorundo 
Westmoreland Hospital 
Greensburg, PA 

Ernest F. Dostalik 
Ernie's Pharmacy 
Midland, PA 

Thomas A. Drumm 
Rea and Derick, Inc. 
Bradford, PA 

Janice J. Druschel 

Westmoreland Hospital Association 
Greensburg, PA 

Leo Einloth 
Robinson Pharmacy 
Pittsburgh, PA 



Raymond J. Farkas 
National Institute of Health 
Department of Nuclear Medicine — 
Radiopharmaceutical Section 
Bethesda, MD 

Thomas J. Fowler 
Sewickley Valley Hospital 
Sewickley, PA 

John Fris 

Ebensburg Center 
Ebensburg, PA 

Charles Geiger 
Director of Pharmacy 
Holy Spirit Hospital 
Camp Hill, PA 

James A. Gillespie 
Kramer Pharmacy Inc. 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Anthony (Steve) Giordano 
Temple Pharmacy 
Kane, PA 

Marshall Goldstein 
Pinebridge Apothecary 
Upper St. Clair, PA 

Richard S. Goldstein 
Goldstein's Pharmacy 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Thomas Grande, Pharm.D. 
Allegheny General Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

George Haslett 
SavMore Prescription Center 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Ronald G. Hietsch 
The Medicine Shoppe 
Sharon, PA 

Theresa Hmiel 
Pharmacy 

Medical Center of Beaver County 
Beaver, PA 

Thomas J. Hoffman 

Butler County Community Hospital 
Butler, PA 

William M. Irvin 
Central Drug Store 
Uniontown, PA 

Thomas E. Jackovic 

McCracken Pharmacy Inc. 
Waynesburg, PA 

Gerald W. John 

Ohio Valley Hospital 

Steubenville, OH 
Jack Kay 

Latrobe Area Hospital 

Latrobe, PA 
Philip Keys, Pharm .D. 

Director of Pharmacy 

Allegheny General Hospital 

Pittsburgh, PA 

Patricia C. Kienle 
Pharmacy Manager 
Mercy Hospital 
Wilkes Barre, PA 



80 



Francis A. Kittell 
Community Pharmacy 
Portage. PA 

Charles G. Roller 

Meadville City Hospital Pharmacy 
Meadville, PA 

John J. Krzan 

Medical Center Pharmacy 
Gibsonia, PA 

Andrew F. Kuzy 
Western Center Pharmacy 
Canonsburg, PA 

Loretta L'Atrelli 

Uniontown Hospital 
Uniontown, PA 

David Leach 
Penn Laurel Pharmacy 
Central City, PA 

Robert Lefkowitz 
Penn Taft Pharmacy 
West Mifflin, PA 

Stanford A. Lefkowitz 
Penn Taft Pharmacy 
West Mifflin, PA 

John R. Lewis 

Hamot Medical Center 
Erie, PA 

William S. Liepack 
Beacon Pharmacy 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Amandus A. Link 

UrbanTs Pharmacy, Inc. 
Jeannette, PA 

Patricia Lizak 
Medical Center of Beaver County 
Beaver, PA 

John Lowe 
VA Hospital 
Leech Farm 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Thomas Maloney 
Ingram Pharmacy 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Thomas Mann 
Oakland VA Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Robert Martello 
North Hills Passavant Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

David Mattei 
Mercy Hospital 
Scranton, PA 

Carol Matthews 
West Allegheny Hospital 
Oakdale, PA 

Kenneth Maurer, Pharm. D. 
Jefferson Medical Center 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Harry Menk 
Director of Pharmacy 
Monongahela Valley Hospital 
Monongahela, PA 



Sandy Mitchell 
Allegheny Valley Hospital 
Natrona Heights, PA 

Connie Mitro 

Director of Pharmacy 
McKeesport Hospital 
McKeesport, PA 

William Montgomery 
Franklin Hospital Pharmacy 
Franklin, PA 

Joseph Mosso 

Mosso's Pharmacy Inc. 
Latrobe, PA 

David Nedzinski 
Director of Pharmacy 
Andrew Kaul Memorial Hospital 
St. Mary's, PA 

Phillip Nerti 
Divine Providence Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Elaine Nigro 
Jefferson Medical Center 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Roberto Nix 
John Kane Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Leonard O'Hara 
Chief Pharmacist 
Mercy Hospital 
Scranton, PA 

Mark H. OToole 
Braddock General Hospital 
Braddock, PA 

Richard A. Ottmar 
Sacred Heart Hospital 
Cumberland, MD 

Anthony R. Passed 

Public Drug Store/Tusca Plaza 
Beaver, PA 

Loretta Patton 
High Point Pharmacy 
Erie, PA 

John Rosencrance 

Richland Drug Store, Inc. 
Johnstown, PA 

John P. Rosile 
Pike Pharmacy 
Canonsburg, PA 

Charles Rosko 
South Side Hospital of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, PA 

James Rossano 

St. Francis Hospital of New Castle 
New Castle, PA 

Lee Ann Rossman 
Hamot Medical Center 
Erie, PA 

James F. Rovegno 

Lawrence Park Apothecary 
Erie, PA 



181 



John Russo, Jr. 

Russo's Pharmacy Inc. 
New Castle, PA 

Henry Sagan 
Marland Heights Pharmacy 
Weirton, WV 

James E. Sandala 
West Pcnn Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

John P. Sansone 

Woodville State Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Frank Scalise 
Beverly Pharmacy 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Sidney Shabrin 

Americus Pharmacy 
Allentown, PA 

Phillip B. Sollon 
Sollon Pharmacy 
Canonsburg, PA 

Donald L. Spencer 

Executive Director 

Cumberland Area Health 

Education Center 

Cumberland, MD 
Robert B. Stanck 

Director of Pharmacy Services 

Good Samaritan Hospital 

Pottsville, PA 
Williard A. Stephens 

Stephens Prescription Drug Store, Inc. 

Moscow, PA 

Lee Stilley 
Sharon General Hospital 
Sharon, PA 

Frank J. Stroker, Jr. 
Warren General Hospital Pharmacy 
Warren, PA 

Tim Stukus/Dan Fritz 
Central Medical Health Services 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Dolores M. Sudar 

Aliquippa Hospital 

Aliquippa, PA 
Robert D. Swenson 

Westmoreland Hospital 

Greensburg, PA 

Edward P. Szarnicki 
Eckerd Drug Store/Heights Plaza 
Natrona Heights, PA 



Ronald Taormina 
St. Francis General Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Charles Tarasovic 
St. Margaret Memorial Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Charles D. Thomas 
Charles D. Thomas Drug Store 
Pittsburgh, PA 

George Toth 

Director of Pharmacy 

Altoona Hospital 

Altoona, PA 
Charles F. Traeger 

Ayres Drug Store 

McKeesport, PA 
Mary L. Vito 

Millard Pharmacy 

McKees Rocks, PA 

Daniel Wagner 
Medi Pharmacy 
Gibsonia, PA 

Louis Wakefield 
Director of Pharmacy Services 
St. Joseph Hospital 
Reading, PA 

Donald Waltmire 
Ray Westbrook 

Westbrook Pharmacy and Surgical Supply 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Thomas Weimer 

McKeesport Hospital 

McKeesport, PA 
Jack Welch 

Jameson Memorial Hospital 

New Castle, PA 

Lavonne Wieczorek 

H.C. Frick Community Hospital 

Mt. Pleasant, PA 
Stephen W. Wiley 

Director of Pharmacy 

The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 

Hershey, PA 
Mary Winek 

Apothocary Shoppe 

Allison Park, PA 



182 



MURPHY MART PHARMACY 

Suzanne Zavora 

Beverly Hamilton 

Tim Donohue 

Bob Miller 

Robert Pruss 

James Clougherty 
Home Office 
G.C. Murphy Co. 
McKeesport, PA 

THRIFT DRUG 

Clifford Beisel, #51 

McKnight Siebert Shopping Center 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Dave Bricker 
Grants Plaza 
Coraopolis, PA 

James Carr. #5 
425 Beaver Road 
Sewickley, PA 

Paul Culan 

Kenmawr Plaza 
McKees Rocks, PA 

David Dolan 
Ritzland Shopping Center 
Pittsburgh, PA 

William F. Donley 
1956 Greentree Road 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Alan Kart 
Southland Shopping Center 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Frank Konieczny, #90 
2200 Northway Mall 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Mort Kuber, #24 

300 Mt. Lebanon Boulevard 
Pittsburgh, PA 



Joe Lettrich, #80 
Barb Greco 

Hillcrest Shopping Center 

New Kensington, PA 

Don Lucidi, #100 
Clyde Mansfield 

2 Olympia Shopping Center 

McKeesport, PA 

Arnold Robert 

Franklin Plaza Shopping Center 
Murraysville, PA 

Linda Rocchi 

12254 Frankstown Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Jack Rohland 
4 1 1 Corbet Street 
Tarentum, PA 

David Sas #27 
623-625 E. Ohio Street 
Pittsburgh, PA 

John Saversky, #78 
South Park Shops 
Bethel Park, PA 

Fred Wolken 
Oakland/Squirrel Hill Area 
Pittsburgh, PA 



RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) 
ADMINISTRATION 

Captain Kenneth P. Bostelman, 
B.S., Professor of Military Science 

FACULTY— DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 



Faculty: 

Captain Kenneth P. Bostelman 

Professor of Military Science 

B.S., Eastern Kentucky Military University 

Captain Richard F. Sollner, Jr. 
Professor of Military Science 
B.S., United States Military Academy 



Captain Gerald L. Boldt 
Assistant Professor of Military Science 
B.S., M.A., Mankato State University 






Index 



83 



Academic 

Advisor 154 

Calendar 2 

Load — Arts and Sciences 17 

Policies 154 

Regulations — Arts and Sciences 17 

Summer Sessions 142 

Supervisor of Intercollegiate Athletics 154 

Academic Policies 154 

Academic Advisor 154 

Academic Supervisor of Intercollegiate 

Athletics 154 

Auditing Courses 154 

Cancellation of Courses 155 

Class Attendance 155 

Course Examinations 155 

Classification of Students 155 

Credit by Examination 155 

Dean's List 155 

Grading System 155 

Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit. . 157 

Graduation Requirements 157 

Honors 157 

Pass/Fail Electives 156 

Quality Point System 156 

Repeating Courses and Course 

Retrogradation 156 

Student Standing 156 

Transfer Within the University 158 

Unit of Credit 157 

Withdrawal Course 158 

Accounting Curriculum 67 

Accreditation and Affiliation 12 

Administration and Faculty 160 

Administration Building 10 

Administrative Officers 159 

Admissions 140 

Advanced Placement 142 

Applications 

First Year Students 140 

Other Categories 141 

International Students (Undergraduate) . . 141 

Post-Graduates 141 

Readmission 141 

Temporary Transfers 142 

Transfers 141 

College Level Examination Program 142 

Credit Hour Bank 143 

Early Admissions 141 

Early Decision Plan 140 

Office 140 

Policy 140 

Requirements 140 

Summer Session 142 

Duquesne Students 142 

Other Students 142 

Admission, Special Requirements 

Education 76 

Music 84 

Nursing 109 

Pharmacy 122 

Advanced Placement 142 

Advisor 

Academic 154 

International Student 136 

Application 

Credit Hour Bank 143 

Fee 140,149 

for Financial Aid 144 

New First-Year Students 140 

Early Admission 141 

Early Decision 140 

Other Categories 141 

International Students 141 

Post-Graduates 141 

Readmission 141 

Summer Session 142 



Duquesne Students 142 

Students from Other Institutions 142 

Transfers 141 

Temporary 142 

Applied Music Courses 93 

Applied Technology, Associate Degree 17 

Army ROTC 132 

Art Division 18 

Courses 18 

Requirements for Major 18 

Requirements for Minor 18 

Arts and Sciences 

See Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of 
Associate Degree Programs, College 

of Arts and Science 17 

Assumption Hall 10 

Athletics 135 

Attendance, Class 155 

Auditing Courses 154 

Auditor's Fee 149 

Bachelor-Master's Program 17 

Bachelor's Degree Fee 150 

Bachelor's Degree-Second 17 

Bachelor's Degree, Three-Year 17 

Bachelor's-Professional School Program 17 

Bad Checks 152 

Bassoon Courses 93 

Behavioral Sciences, Division of 71 

International Business 71 

Law Administration 71 

Management 72 

Marketing 73 

Pre-Legal 72 

Billing Problems 152 

Biochemistry 23 

Biological Sciences 

Courses 20 

Department of 20 

Requirements for Major 20 

Requirements for Minor 20 

Board of Directors 159 

Bureau of Research and Community Services . . 64 
Business and Administration 

School of 64 

Accreditation and Affiliation 12 

Bureau of Research and Community Services . . 64 

Bureau of Research 65 

Center for: 

Administration of Legal Systems 65 

Economic Education 65 

International Management 65 

Course Descriptions 

Accounting 67 

Economic Science 74 

Finance 68 

International Business 71 

Law Administration 71 

Management 72 

Management Information Systems 70 

Marketing 73 

Pre-Legal 72 

Quantitative Methods 69 

Curriculums 

Accounting 67 

Economic Science 74 

Finance 68 

International Business 71 

Law Administration 71 

Management 72 

Management Information Systems 70 

Marketing 73 

Pre-Legal 72 

Quantitative Methods 69 

Degree 64 

Divisions and Programs 65 

Behavioral Science 71 



84 



Economic Science 74 

Quantitative Science 67 

History 64 

Philosophy and Objectives 64 

Sample Program 66 

Scholarships 146 

Student Organizations 65 

Calendar, Academic 2 

Cancellation of Courses 155 

Campus Ministry 139 

Canevin Hall 10 

Career Planning and Placement 135 

Cashing Checks 152 

Catholic Lay Teacher Discount 149 

Center for 

Academic and Career Development 135 

Administration of Legal Systems 65 

Economic Education 65 

International Management 65 

Certification 

Music Education 85 

Teacher Education 78 

Certified Public Accountant Requirements .... 67 

Change of Schedule 153 

Fee 149, 153 

Checks 152 

Bad 1 52 

Cashing 152 

Chemistry 22 

Courses 23 

Department of 22 

Requirements for Major 23 

Requirements for Minor 23 

Clarinet Courses 94 

Class Attendance 155 

Classics 24 

Courses 25 

Department of 24 

Requirements for Major 24 

Requirements for Minor 24 

Classification of Students 155 

Full-time 155 

Part-time 155 

Post-Graduate 155 

Clergy Discounts 148 

Clinical Pharmacy, Department of 129 

Code of Student Rights, 

Responsibilities and Conduct 138 

College Hall 10 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) ... 143 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

See Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of 
Communications for Industry, 

Associate Degree 17 

Competitive Scholarships 144 

Computer Sciences 26 

Courses 27 

Division of 26 

Requirements for Major 26 

Requirements for Minor 27 

Confidentiality of Student Records . 154 

Concentrated Studies Program . 15 

Cooperative Education 16 

Corporation, The Duquesne 159 

Costs. See Fees and Tuition 

Counseling Center 10 

Course 

Examination 155 

Retrogradation 156 

Course Descriptions 

Arts and Sciences 18 

Business and Administration 67 

Education 79 

Music 93 

Nursing 113 

Pharmacy 126 

ROTC 133 

Courses 

Auditing 154 

Cancellation of 155 



Repeating 156 

Criminal Justice, Associate Degree 17 

Credit 

By Examination 155 

Hour Bank 143 

Unit of 157 

Cross-Registration 153 

Curriculums 

Arts and Sciences 14 

Bachelor-Master's 17 

Bachelor's/Professional School 17 

Liberal Arts Engineering 17 

Pre-Law 16 

Second Bachelor's Degree 17 

Three Year Bachelor's 17 

Cooperative Education 16 

Business and Administration 

Accounting 67 

Economic Science 74 

Finance 68 

International Business 71 

Law Administration 71 

Management 70 

Management Information Systems 70 

Marketing 73 

Pre-Legal 72 

Quantitative Methods 69 

Education 

Early Childhood 77 

Elementary 77 

Music 99 

Secondary 78 

Special Education 78 

Music 

Jazz 89 

Music Education 91 

Music Therapy 92 

Orchestral Instrument 88 

Organ 86 

Piano 86 

Voice 87 

Sacred Music 

Voice 90 

Organ 89 

Nursing 113 

Pharmacy 118 

Medical Technology 120 

Radiological Health 121 

ROTC 133 

Dean of Students, Office of the 135 

International Students 136 

Dean's List 157 

Degree 

Arts and Sciences 16 

Awarded with Honors 157 

Business and Administration 64 

Education 76 

Music 84 

Nursing 109 

Pharmacy 117 

Degrees and Programs Offered 8 

Departments, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Biological Sciences 20 

Chemistry 22 

Classics 24 

Computer Science 26 

Economics 28 

English . 28 

Fine Arts (Art Division) 18 

History 31 

Journalism 34 

Mathematics 36 

Media Arts 38 

Modern Languages 39 

Philosophy 45 

Physics 47 

Political Science 50 

Psychology 53 

Sociology 54 

Speech Communication and Theatre 57 



85 



Theology 60 

Departments, School of Pharmacy 

Clinical Pharmacy 129 

Medical Technology 120 

Pharmaceutical Administration 128 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry and 

Pharmaceutics 126 

Pharmacology-Toxicology 127 

Radiological Health 121 

Des Places Communications Center 10 

Development Services 136 

Career Planning and Placement 135 

Learning Skills Program 137 

Psychological Center for 

Training and Research 137 

Testing Bureau 136 

Directors and Officers 159 

Board of Directors 159 

The Duquesne Corporation 159 

Officers of the University 160 

Discounts, University 148 

Divisions, School of Business and Administration 

Behavioral Science 7! 

Economic Science 74 

Quantitative Science 67 

Double Bass Courses 94 

Dormitories 

Assumption Hall 10 

Duquesne Towers 11 

Expenses 151 

St. Ann Hall 121 

St. Martin Hall 12 

Dropping and Adding Courses 153 

Duquesne 

Corporation 159 

Duke (Newspaper) 138 

Magazine 138 

Towers 11 

Union 11 

Early Admission 141 

Early Childhood Education 

Courses 80 

Program 77 

Early Decision 141 

Earth Science Courses 50 

Economic Science, Division 74 

Curriculum 74 

Economics 

Courses 74 

Department of 28 

Requirements for Major 28 

Requirements for Minor 28 

Education, School of 76 

Accreditation and Affiliation 12 

Admission 76 

Class Attendance 79 

Competency Core Curriculum 77 

Course Descriptions 79 

Early Childhood 80 

Educational Foundations and Psychology . . 79 

Elementary 81 

Secondary 82 

Special 82 

Curriculum 76 

General Education 76 

Professional Education 76 

Professional Laboratory Experiences 76 

Degree 76 

Dual Certification 78 

General Education Required Courses 77 

History 76 

Honor Awards 79 

Program Credit Requirements 

Early Childhood 77 

Elementary 77 

Music 77 

Secondary 78 

Special Education 78 

Scholarships 146 

Student Organizations 79 



Teacher Certification 78 

Educational Foundations and Psychology 79 

Edward J. Hanley Hall, The 11 

Effective Catalog-Arts and Sciences 17 

Elementary Education 

Courses 81 

Program Credit Requirements 77 

English 

Courses 29 

Department of 28 

Honors Program 29 

Requirements for Major 28 

Requirements for Minor 29 

Evening Study 12 

Examinations 

Advanced Placement 142 

CLEP Examinations 143 

Course Examinations 155 

Unit 155 

Final 155 

Credit by 155 

Expenses. See Tuition and Fees 

Facilities, Physical 10 

Faculty, Administration and Arts and Sciences . . . 

160 

Business and Administration 167 

Education 169 

Music 170 

Nursing 173 

Pharmacy 1 76 

ROTC 182 

Federal Nursing Loans 145 

Fee, University 149 

Fees, General. See Tuition and Fees 

Finance Curriculum 68 

Financial Aid 143 

Application Procedure 144 

Award Conditions 143 

Competitive Scholarships 144 

Current Information 144 

Federal Nursing Loans 145 

Financial Need 143 

Gift Assistance 143 

Guaranteed Student Loan 145 

Health Profession Loans 145 

Meeting Student Need 144 

National Direct Student Loans 144 

Other Sources of Aid 145 

Parish Scholarship 144 

Pell Grant Program 145 

Principles of Aid 143 

Program Funding 144 

Programs 144 

State Grant Assistance 145 

Student Employment 145 

Student Self-Help 143 

Supplemental Educational 

Opportunity Grants 144 

University Aid 144 

University Scholars Award 144 

Financial Aid — Departments and Schools .... 145 

Business and Administration 146 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 145 

Education 146 

Music 146 

Nursing 147 

Pharmacy 147 

General University Scholarships 148 

ROTC Scholarships 149 

University Discounts 148 

Financial Matters 152 

Billing Problems 152 

Student Financing Program 152 

Cashing Checks 152 

Bad Checks 152 

Fine Arts (See Art Division) 

First- Year Students, Admission of 140 

Flute Courses 94 

French Courses 40 

Full-Time Students 155 



186 



G and G Building 11 

General Education 77 

General Information 9 

German Courses 41 

Grade Reports, Semester 154 

Grading System 155 

Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit ... 157 
Graduation 

Fees 150 

Honors 157 

Requirements 157 

Greek Courses 25 

Guaranteed Student Loans 145 

Guitar Courses 94 

Gymnasium 11 

Handbook, Student 138 

Hanley Hall, The Edward J 11 

Harp Courses 95 

Health Profession Loans 145 

Health 

Insurance 136 

Services 136 

History 31 

Courses 31 

Department of 31 

Requirements for Major 31 

Requirements for Minor 31 

History of Duquesne 9 

Honors, Graduation 157 

Honors Awards 

Education 79 

Music 85 

Nursing Ill 

Pharmacy 1 24 

Honor Societies 137 

Horn Courses 95 

Housing. See Dormitories 

Inter-Fraternity Council 137 

International 

Business Curriculum 68 

Education, Policy Statement on 9 

Communications, Associate Degree 17 

International Relations, Political Science .... 51 

Student Advisement 136 

Students, Admission of 141 

Inter-School Minors 17 

Italian Courses 42 

Journalism 

Courses 34 

Department of 34 

Requirements for Major 34 

Requirements for Minor 34 

Scholarships 145 

Laboratory Fees 

General 150 

Pharmacy 123, 150 

Late Registration 

• Fee 149 

Policy .154 

Latin Courses 25 

Law Administration Curriculum 71 

Learning Skills Program 137 

L'Espirit du Due (Yearbook) 138 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of 14 

Academic 

Load 17 

Regulations 17 

Requirements 14 

University-Level Courses Taken While 

in High School 17 

Course Descriptions 18 

Art Division 18 

Biological Sciences 20 

Chemistry 23 

Classics 25 

Computer Science 27 

Economics 66 



English 29 

History 31 

International Relations 51 

Journalism 34 

Mathematics 36 

Media Arts 51 

Modern Languages and Literature 40 

Philosophy 45 

Physics 48 

Political Science 51 

Psychology 53 

Sociology 55 

Speech Communications and Theatre .... 57 

Theology 16 

World Literature 18 

Accreditation and Affiliation 12 

Curricular Requirements 14 

Degrees 15 

Effective Catalog 17 

Electives 17 

History 14 

Majors and Minors 18 

Philosophy and Objectives 9 

Special Programs 15 

Associate Degrees 17 

Concentrated Studies 15 

Cooperative Education 16 

World Literature Program 16 

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and 

General Sciences 16 

Pre-Law 16 

Pre-Professional Health Education 16 

Inter-School Minors 17 

Bachelor-Master's 17 

Bachelor/Professional School 17 

Liberal Arts Engineering 17 

Second Bachelor's Degree 17 

Three-year Bachelor's 17 

CLEP and Advanced Placement 17, 142 

Scholarships 145 

Library Resource Center 11 

Loans. See Scholarships and Loans 

Management Curriculum 72 

Management Information Systems 70 

Marketing Curriculum 73 

Mathematics 

Courses 36 

Department of 36 

Requirements for Major 36 

Requirements for Minor 36 

Matriculation Deposit 149 

McCloskey Field 11 

Media Arts 

Courses 38 

Requirements for Major 38 

Requirements for Minor 38 

Medical Technology, Department of ... . 120, 129 

Mellon Hall of Science 11 

Military Science, Department of 132 

Ministry, Campus 139 

Modern Languages & Literatures 

Courses 40 

Department of 39 

French Courses 40 

German Courses 41 

Italian Courses 42 

Requirements for Major 39 

Requirements for Minor 40 

Russian Courses 43 

Spanish Courses 43 

Music Education 103 

Music, School of 84 

Accreditation and Affiliation 12 

Admission 84 

Advisement 84 

Building 11 

Course Descriptions 93 

Applied Music 93 

Bassoon 93 

Clarinet 94 



187 



Double Bass 94 

Flute 94 

Guitar-Classical/Jazz 94 

Harp 95 

Horn 95 

Oboe 95 

Organ . 95 

Percussion 96 

Piano 96 

Saxophone 97 

Trombone and Baritone Horn 97 

Trumpet 97 

Tuba 98 

Viola 98 

Violin 98 

Violoncello 98 

Voice 98 

Conducting 103 

Conservatory 86 

Ensemble 103 

Music Education 99 

Bassoon 99 

Clarinet 99 

Double Bass 99 

Flute 99 

Guitar-Classical/Jazz 99 

Harp 100 

Horn 100 

Oboe 100 

Organ 100 

Percussion 101 

Piano . . 101 

Saxophone 101 

Trombone and Baritone Horn 101 

Trumpet 102 

Tuba 102 

Violin 102 

Viola 102 

Violoncello 102 

Voice 103 

Music History, Literature and Art 104 

Music Theory 105 

Music Therapy 106 

Non-Music Majors 107 

Sacred Music 106 

Tamburitzans Institute of Folk Arts 107 

Degrees 84 

Equipment 85 

Fees, Special 84 

History 84 

Honor Awards 85 

Philosophy and Objectives 84 

Programs 86 

Conservatory 86 

Jazz Performance 89 

Orchestral Instrument/Classical Guitar . . 88 

Organ 86 

Piano 86 

Voice 87 

Sacred Music 

Organ 89 

Voice 90 

Recital Attendance 85 

Other Attendance Requirements 85 

Scholarships 146 

Student Organizations 85 

Teacher Certification 85 

Theology Requirements 86 

National Direct Student Loans 144 

Nursing, School of 108 

Accreditation and Affiliation 12 

Admission of Registered Nurse Students .... 109 

Admission Requirements 109 

Course Descriptions 113 

Curriculum Standards 113 

Definition/Philosophy 108 

Degree 109 

Expenses, Additional Ill 

Graduation Requirements Ill 

Grievance Procedure 112 



History 108 

Honor Awards Ill 

Nursing Electives . . . .' 114 

Program Purposes, Goal & Indicators 109 

Program of Study 109 

Recommended Course Sequences 112 

Requirements/Additional Ill 

Scholarships and Loans 145, 147 

Second Degree Program 110 

Student Organizations Ill 

Student Rights 112 

Temporary Transfer 110 

Transfer Student Admission 110 

Oboe Courses 95 

Official Registration 153 

Officers, Administrative 159 

Organ Courses 95 

Organizations. See Student Organizations 

Pan-Hellenic Council 137 

Parish Scholarship 144 

Part-Time Students 155 

Pass/Fail Electives 156 

Pell Grant Programs 145 

Percussion Courses 96 

Pharmaceutical Administration, 

Department of 128 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Pharmaceutics, 

Department of 126 

Pharmacists, State Licensing of 125 

Pharmacology-Toxicology, Department of .... 127 

Pharmacy, School of 117 

Accreditation and Affiliation 12 

Admission 122 

Areas of Concentration 119 

Career Guidance Center 126 

Course Descriptions 126 

Clinical Pharmacy 129 

Medical Technology 129 

Pharmacy Curriculum 118 

Pharmaceutical Administration 128 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

and Pharmaceutics 126 

Pharmacology-Toxicology 127 

Professional Electives 130 

Radiological Health 130 

Curriculum Majors 118 

Degrees 117 

Graduation Requirements 125 

History 117 

Honor Awards 124 

Philosophy and Objectives 117 

Programs 117 

Pharmacy 117 

Medical Technology 120 

Radiological Health 121 

Research Foundation 126 

Residency Requirements 118 

Regulations 123 

Scholars Program 122 

Scholarships and Loans 147 

Special Fees 123 

Activities 123 

Laboratory 123 

School of Pharmacy Fee 123 

State Licensing 

Pennsylvania 125 

States Other Than Pennsylvania 125 

Student Organizations 123 

Philosophy and Objectives, University 9 

Philosophy 

Courses 45 

Department of 45 

Requirements for Major 45 

Requirements for Minor 45 

Physics 47 

Courses 48 

Department of 47 

Earth Science 48 

Requirements for Major 48 



188 



Requirements for Minor 48 

Physical Facilities 10 

Piano Courses 96 

Placement Center, Career Planning and 135 

Policy Statement on International Education . . 9 
Political Science 

Courses 51 

Department of 50 

Requirements for Major 50 

Requirements for Minor 51 

Post-Graduate Students, Admission of 141 

Pre-Law Program 16 

Pre-Legal Program 72 

Pre-Professional Health Education 16 

Professional and Department Organizations ... 137 
Psychological Center for 

Training and Research 137 

Psychology 

Courses 53 

Department of 53 

Requirements for Major 53 

Requirements for Minor 53 

Public Safety Building 11 

Publications, Student 138 

Code of Student Rights, 

Responsibilities & Conduct 138 

Duquesne Duke (Newspaper) 138 

Duquesne Magazine 138 

L'Espirit du Due (Yearbook) 138 

Student Handbook 138 

Quality Point System 156 

Quantitative Science 

Division of 67 

Accounting 67 

Finance 68 

Quantitative Methods 69 

Radio and Television, WDUQ 138 

Radiological Health, Department of ... . 121, 130 

Readmission 

Records and Reports 154 

Confidentiality of Student Records 154 

Semester Grade Reports 154 

Transcripts 154 

Red Masquers 138 

Refund 

Room and Board, Withdrawal and 151 

Tuition 151 

Registration 153 

Change of Schedule 153 

Cross 153 

Late 154 

Regulations for Pharmacy Students 123 

Requirements for Graduation 157 

Repeating Courses and 

Course Retrogradation 156 

Reserve Officer Training Corps 132 

Army ROTC Scholarships 133 

Course Descriptions 133 

Department of Military Science 

(Army ROTC) .133 

Early Commissioning 133 

Programs . . 132 

Four- Year 132 

Advanced Course 132 

Basic Course 132 

Common Hour 134 

Direct Entry, Advanced 132 

Simultaneous Membership 133 

Two-Year 133 

Voluntary Adventure and 

Social Activities 134 

Scholarships 149 

Residence 

Council 137 

Life 136 

Residences, Student. See Dormitories 

Residence Hall Pre-Payment Fee 149 

Rockwell Hall 11 

Room and Board 151 



Costs 151 

Withdrawals and Refunds 151 

ROTC. See Reserve Officer Training Corps 
Russian Courses 43 

St. Ann Hall 12 

St. Martin Hall 12 

Saxophone Courses 97 

Scholarships and Loans — 

University Aid 144 

Application Procedure 144 

Competitive Scholarships 144 

Health Profession Loans 145 

National Direct Student Loans 145 

Federal Loans 144 

Parish Scholarships 144 

Student Employment 145 

Supplemental Educational 

Opportunity Grants 144 

University Scholars Awards 144 

Scholarships and Loans — 

Other Sources 145 

Guaranteed Student Loans 145 

Other Possibilities 145 

Pell Grant Program 145 

State Grant Assistance 145 

Scholarships and Loans — 
Departments and Schools 

Arts and Sciences 145 

Business and Administration 146 

Education 146 

General 148 

Music 146 

Nursing 147 

Pharmacy 147 

ROTC 149 

School Year 2 

Schools 

Arts and Sciences 14 

Business and Administration 64 

Education 76 

Music 84 

Nursing 108 

Pharmacy 117 

Second Bachelor's Degree 17 

Secondary Education 

Courses 82 

Programs 78 

Semester 

Grade Reports 154 

Tuition 149 

Senior Citizen Discount 149 

Service Organizations 138 

Social Organizations 138 

Sociology 

Areas of Concentration 55 

Courses 55 

Department of 54 

Requirements for Major 55 

Requirements for Minor 55 

Spanish Courses 43 

Speech Communication and Theatre 

Areas of Concentration 57 

Courses 58 

Department of 57 

Special Education 

Courses 82 

Program 78 

Sports. See Athletics 
State 

Licensing of Pharmacists 125 

Grant Assistance 145 

Student 

Employment 145 

Government Association 137 

Housing. See Dormitories 

Financing Program 152 

Records, Confidentiality of 154 

Standing 156 

Student Services, Programs and 
Organizations 135 



189 



Student Life 135 

Athletics 135 

Dean of Students 135 

Health Insurance/Health Services 136 

Residence Life 136 

Learning Skills Program 137 

Testing Bureau 136 

Psychological Center for 

Testing and Research 137 

Student Governance 137 

Student Government Association 137 

Commuter Council 137 

Residence Council 137 

Inter-Fraternity Council 137 

Pan-Hellenic Council 137 

Union Program Board 136 

Student Organizations 137 

Honor Societies 137 

Media 138 

WDUQ Radio and Television 138 

WDRC 138 

Performance Groups 138 

Tamburitzans 138 

Red Masquers Theatre 138 

Professional and Departmental 

Business and Administration 65 

Education 79 

Music 85 

Nursing Ill 

Pharmacy 123 

Publications 138 

Duquesne Duke Newspaper 138 

Duquesne Magazine 138 

Code of Student Rights 138 

Student Handbook 138 

Yearbook 138 

Service 138 

Social 138 

Summer and Special Session 

Tuition and Fee Charges 1 50 

Summer Session 13, 142 

Duquesne Students 142 

Transfer Students 142 

Supplemental Educational 

Opportunity Grants 144 

Systems Center/Computer Resources 13 

Tamburitzans 138 

Teacher Certification 

Education 78 

Music 85 

Television, WDUQ Radio and 138 

Temporary Transfer Students, Admission of 

Academic Year 142 

Summer Session 142 

Testing Bureau 136 

Theatre 138 

Theology 

Courses 60 

Department of 60 

Three- Year Bachelor's Program 17 

Transcripts 154 

Transfer Within the University 158 



Transfer Students 

Admission of 141 

Temporary 142 

Temporary — Summer 142 

Trinity Hall 12 

Trombone Courses 97 

Trumpet Courses 97 

Tuba Courses 98 

Tuition and Fees 149 

Application Fee 149 

Auditor's Fee 149 

Change of Schedule Fee 149 

Credit by Examination Fee 149 

Graduation Fees 150 

Laboratory Fees 149 

Late Registration Fee 149 

Matriculation Deposit 149 

Remission of Tuition 151 

Removal of I Grade 149 

Residence Hall Pre-Payment 149 

Room and Board 151 

Withdrawal and Refund 151 

Scholarships 144 

Special Fees 

Business and Administration 149 

Music 84, 149 

Nursing 99 

Pharmacy 123, 149 

Summer and Special Session 150 

Tuition 149 

University Fee 149 

Withdrawal and Termination of 

Attendance 150 

Tuition Remission Schedule 151 

Within the Semester 151 

Within the Summer Session 151 

Union Program Board 136 

Unit of Credit 157 

University 

Accreditation and Affiliation 12 

Administrative Officers 159 

Board of Directors 159 

Buildings 10 

Discounts 148 

Duquesne Corporation 159 

History 9 

Philosophy and Objectives 9 

Policy Statements on International 

Education 9 

Scholars Awards 144 

Setting 10 

Viola Courses/Violin Courses 98 

Violoncello Courses/Voice Courses 98 

WDUQ Radio and Television 138 

Withdrawal 

From a Course 158 

From the University 150 

Women's Sports. See Athletics 

World Literature Program 16 



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